First reloading question (pic)


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Tophatter52
August 10, 2013, 09:22 PM
Well first off I want to say hello from the south! not what I wanted my first post but I guess it will work.

So I started reloading about two weeks ago and for the most part going fine,but I just got some 357 dies and they are leaving a really strange marks on the brass. during the sizing.

http://i1360.photobucket.com/albums/r643/James_Larusch/20130810_210117_zps63b1ebbf.jpg (http://s1360.photobucket.com/user/James_Larusch/media/20130810_210117_zps63b1ebbf.jpg.html)

I got the dies used for 20 bucks (old Ch die company) can any one explain what's going on?

Again it's good to be here on the high road been looking around for the better part of the last five years figured I should join.

--James C

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Magnum Shooter
August 10, 2013, 09:33 PM
The die has quite a bit of galling inside (little bits of metal stuck inside). If they are carbide dies they might clean up with some steel wool or some emery cloth. If they are steel dies they are most likely trash.

floydster
August 10, 2013, 09:35 PM
Never seen that before.
Case no. 1 unsized??
Case no. 2 sized??
Case no. 3 ??

Looks like the die has some strange lines running length wise in the die.
Clean it and look inside--what does it look like?? Are there lines that you can see??

dodge
August 10, 2013, 09:40 PM
If they are steel you might be able to polish the scratches out just be careful not to take too much metal. If the scratches are too deep then they are probably junk.

rcmodel
August 10, 2013, 09:44 PM
The die has quite a bit of galling inside (little bits of metal stuck inside).This is correct.

You bought steel dies that were used with no case lube when sizing brass.

As a result, the brass stuck to the steel and galded to the inside of the dies.

You can clean them with Copper Solvent bore cleaner, which will eat the brass, but not the steel.

Or you can polish them with a split wood dowel rod and a flap of 320 grit emery paper & oil in an electric drill.

The emery paper will eat the brass, without harming the hardened steel die.

Now, when you get it cleaned and polished again?
You MUST use case lube on every case you size to prevent it happening again.

See, you didn't save a cent buying old obsolete dies you didn't know a thing about.

You could have got brand new Carbide dies for not much more, and this simply could not have happened in the first place.

rc

ArchAngelCD
August 10, 2013, 11:20 PM
Welcome to the forum...

All the above is correct and what rc said will fix the problem BUT, if it were me I would not take the time to clean up a set of used $20 dies that will require the use of lube on EVERY CASE when you can buy a brand new set of Carbide dies from Lee for only $31.49. That's just my take on it...

rcmodel
August 10, 2013, 11:24 PM
All the above is correctAnd that is exactly correct too.

Rather then trying to clean them up?

Chalk it up to a beginners mistake, and buy a new set of carbide dies and be done with it.

You screwed up buying them without knowing what you were doing.

So move on and make it a learning experience you won't repeat again.

rc

Walkalong
August 11, 2013, 08:37 AM
Use solvent, let them soak. Then use a brass or nylon brush with steel wool wrapped around it, chuck it up in a drill and go to work. If there is still some brass left after that, soak with solvent again. I certainly had more time and energy than I had money when I first started reloading, so I would have salvaged them.

Or just buy some carbide dies. Not having to lube pistol cases sure is nice. :)

dickttx
August 11, 2013, 09:52 AM
OR, you could just buy a new or used carbide sizing die. The other dies are the same.

lightman
August 11, 2013, 12:17 PM
I would probably try to clean them up, using the methods described above. Maybe even run a bore mop with some Flitz on it, spun with a drill.

Get them cleaned up, use them for a while, then upgrade to a carbide set. Lightman

9w1911
August 11, 2013, 01:03 PM
looks just like my first day loading as well, so green, lets stuff kinda clean brass through a steel used rcbs .45acp set how long do you think I lasted before a shell was stuck? Also the markings looked identical to the picture posted, op go buy some carbide dies. Keep them clean keep the brass clean and I lube and size. I never go dry into a sizer die regardless if its carbide

Tophatter52
August 11, 2013, 01:39 PM
Yeah well I just mark it as a beginners mistake. On the flip side of things I went back to my reloading store today after I got off from work to just buy a new set of dies for $28.89. When I got to the counter it was the same man who sold me the used ones when he asked why I was back..I told him about my problem he gave me the new dies for free ^_^ I really like my local store a lot more now.

Thank you all for helping me out and I'll keep the CH dies as a reminder about buying used tools with out looking.

--James

BBQJOE
August 11, 2013, 05:36 PM
Well gang, I have been using my lee carbide sizing die (in 44) for about 7 years now, and this exact thing started to happen to me yesterday.
I ended up taking the die apart, and using steel wool, a dowel and a drill, I worked it for a good time.
I was able to clean it up a bit not not all.
I thought carbide dies weren't supposed to do this.

gamestalker
August 11, 2013, 06:03 PM
If it were me, I would spring for a carbide sizing die and be done with all the lubing mess that comes with old steel pistol dies, it's not worth the head ache to load something that is a simple to load as .357. I used old steel pistol dies way back when and hated it, nothing worse than having to deal with lube for a cartridge that is typically loaded in large, or larger quantities such as pistol brass.

Other wise try to restore or de-gall those dies, in hope that they are even able to be restored.

GS

GarySTL
August 11, 2013, 06:31 PM
I use carbide pistol dies, but still lube with One Shot. Takes but a moment to lube 2-300 cases in a small cardboard box and the press just runs so smooth and easy. No need to clean it off either.

BYJO4
August 11, 2013, 08:05 PM
I also suggest that you buy a new carbide die set and throw that old set away.

Walkalong
August 11, 2013, 08:12 PM
Never throw dies away. Might come in handy for something someday.

ArchAngelCD
August 11, 2013, 09:50 PM
Never throw dies away. Might come in handy for something someday.
I agree 100%, never throw away dies, having them or the parts in them just might save you late on a Sunday night some time.

243winxb
August 11, 2013, 10:10 PM
If brass was trimmed and not chamfered/deburred, it may look like that after damaging the die. Nickel plated brass may be even harder on dies. I know some dies are not has hard as we think.

gamestalker
August 12, 2013, 01:34 AM
Ya, don't just throw them away, if anything, clean them up and post them on Craiges List for $20. I'm sure some unsuspecting new reloader will snatch them up. Then again, what would be the odds of that happening?

GS

Walkalong
August 12, 2013, 02:46 PM
Yes, but he would advertise them correctly.

Mal H
August 12, 2013, 02:53 PM
... he asked why I was back..I told him about my problem he gave me the new dies for free ^_^ I really like my local store a lot more now.
Now that is refreshing, and the shop is one you should patronize. Where is it located? Maybe there are other members and readers in the same area who would like to know where an honest shop owner is located.

Tophatter52
August 12, 2013, 08:50 PM
place is called deer creek in Marietta, GA..they are old school for the most part black powder and single action stuff but full reloading supply's

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