223 Brass question


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myFRAGisFUBAR
August 12, 2013, 02:20 AM
So I just started loading .223 and most of my brass is range pick up. I wanted to run something by the helpful folks here. Below is a picture of something I was wondering if I should worry about.

http://i47.photobucket.com/albums/f152/killertn_2008/9ac63c78-a8f1-44ac-a45b-9059c5d5f048.jpg (http://s47.photobucket.com/user/killertn_2008/media/9ac63c78-a8f1-44ac-a45b-9059c5d5f048.jpg.html)

In the picture(sorry for terrible lighting, i can get better pictures if needed when my phone charges) I have 3 casings. The top of a new LC round I purchased today. The middle round is a completed reload, and the bottom casing is one i pulled from the process. The new top round clearly has a crimp. The middle and bottom one though don't? I cleared 0 crimps in my loading so I am guessing the bottom pieces have been loaded before? Or does some LC brass just look like this? I give every piece of brass a thorough inspection before loading and this looked good all around. I just don't know why someone would abandon a few hundred cases if they reload and they are all in great shape.:eek: Should I be worried about these rounds? I did the paperclip test and they passed my Wilson gauge. Thanks for the help everyone.

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blarby
August 12, 2013, 03:54 AM
I cleared 0 crimps in my loading so I am guessing the bottom pieces have been loaded before?

That be my wager.

You can see the even chamfering on rounds two and 3, indicating a crimp removal. On #2 it even shaved off part of the NATO symbol, apparently. They wouldn't stamp it in, then shave it off :D In military cartridge assembly, the primer is inserted into properly headstamped brass, and the primer is crimped in at the same time. In this case, the crimp was over the NATO symbol ( or the removal was extremely wide ) and was removed partially.




Should I be worried about these rounds?

If they pass your inspection as described, more than likely not.

I just don't know why someone would abandon a few hundred cases if they reload and they are all in great shape.

Hey, I reload, and I trade used brass in great shape all the time.

Times are tough, might need just *that much more* to get something else you need.

Walkalong
August 12, 2013, 08:20 AM
Yes, the crimp has been removed from that bottom piece of brass by reaming.

joe88xj
August 12, 2013, 09:18 AM
dillon makes the best tool for removing the crimp, doesnt remove any extra material like you see in those pics. Works very fast too! the dillon swager.

X-Rap
August 12, 2013, 10:36 AM
I would wager that the left brass was reman stuff that a non reloader shot and left. Keep the stuff separate from what you know you have if that makes you feel better but if you inspected to your liking shoot it up and enjoy.
I recently got a pretty good pile of range brass that the guy thought was new but the agency purchaser obviously is saving some money buying reman stuff because it has all had the crimps removed and varying head stamps.

Speedster00
August 12, 2013, 11:51 AM
piece 2 and 3 have had the primer reamed. Ive been using a countersink bit and reaming the crimps out...looks exactly like your #2 and #3 above.

ArchAngelCD
August 12, 2013, 12:03 PM
It looks unanimous, the brass at the bottom has it's crimp removed already.

BullfrogKen
August 12, 2013, 09:44 PM
Was brass piece #1 some of the primed Lake City pull down brass MidwayUSA is selling?

beatledog7
August 13, 2013, 08:44 AM
The primer pocket in the bottom piece looks oversized, and, is it just me, or does it have two flash holes? Maybe it's just the lighting.

Walkalong
August 13, 2013, 09:46 AM
It's an optical illusion with that "generously" reamed primer pocket that makes it look big. And wipe the smudge off your glasses if you see two flash holes. :D

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