Who prefers to carry a revolver and why.


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Frank44
August 21, 2013, 06:44 PM
I carry a semi-auto occasionally, but the gun I prefer above all others is a revolver, a S&W 629 4in barrel. I like to carry hot 44spc's in this gun. Why this gun and not a semi-auto? It's the most reliable platform there is. It fires big heavy bullets. It fits my hand better than anything else and I shoot it better than anything else. Last of all, I have the option of using 44mag rounds if needed. Yes, this is the gun for me!

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HankR
August 21, 2013, 06:51 PM
I rarely conceal a revolver, but most of my carry is open and outside of town, and mostly it's a revolver. Depending on purpose it's either a .45 Colt Blackhawk or a single six. When I travel out of town it's normally an SP 101 that goes along in the vehicle (but doesn't get "carried" too often).

Shooting for fun, the semi-autos split the time about 50-50, and for the rare times I CCW it's normally a bottom feeder. I ought to get a OWB or shoulder rig for a 1911, as I enjoy shooting that and ought to take it along more often.

gamestalker
August 21, 2013, 07:18 PM
I prefer a wheel gun over an AL. I know a good deal of LE that have told me of various incidents, in which they, or someone they know has had an AL fail to cycle when they needed it the most. Certain aspects of how the firearm is supported in a heated moment can create a limp wrist syndrome, which caused a cycling problem. I've actually recreated this scenario, and it is indeed a realistic concern of mine.

So for me, I prefer to rely on my wheel gun as my primary SD weapon. That doesn't mean I won't carry an AL, I just don't do so as often, or I'll carry one as a BU weapon.

GS

Potatohead
August 21, 2013, 07:23 PM
I was thinking about putting it to a vote, to see the age differences of revolver carry, too see if, when all of you old geezers are gone, will anybody even be carrying revolvers anymore..I'm thinking my generation is pretty much fascinated by the semi autos only. I'm 36.




Just pickin at you "older" dudes...

btg3
August 21, 2013, 07:27 PM
More here...
http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=725425

But be warned that it also contains: "who prefers to carry a semi-auto and why" ;)

Black Knight
August 21, 2013, 08:09 PM
I usually carry a revolver off duty but a semi-auto on duty. When off duty I normally carry one of my 357 Magnums. Way back in 1978 when I became an armed security officer I started out with a revolver. Today I can use either effectively but feel more at home with a revolver. I also carry more than 2 reloads in speed strips for my revolvers. I have never had a failure to fire that was not ammo based in a revolver but have had several mechanical malfunctions with some relatively high quality semi-autos.

Potatohead: Many of us older guys (I'm 53 BTW) grew up with cowboys as our heros. There were men like The Lone Ranger (Clayton Moore), John Wayne, James Arness, Roy Rogers, Gene Autry, Clint Eastwood and the like that many of us wanted to emulate. We got cap guns and played cowboys and indians or acted like we were in the old west. To us revolvers are natural and bring back some fond memories. Who do the younger crowd have today for their heros? It seems they have Baseball players, Basketball players, and Football players that if it were not for their athletic abilities they would be in jail or dead. They also have rockstars that aren't any better. Not my idea of real heros. Just ribbing you youngsters.

ColtPythonElite
August 21, 2013, 08:14 PM
I also prefer a revolver off-duty.

whatever
August 21, 2013, 08:31 PM
I like carrying a revolver. I feel the rounded lines of the gun make for a more natural look while conceal carrying.

beeenbag
August 21, 2013, 08:36 PM
I was thinking about putting it to a vote, to see the age differences of revolver carry, too see if, when all of you old geezers are gone, will anybody even be carrying revolvers anymore..I'm thinking my generation is pretty much fascinated by the semi autos only. I'm 36.




Just pickin at you "older" dudes...
I actually did a poll just like that not long ago... It turned out very interesting. The results were actually not what I expected at all.

Check it out.

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=604994

Scrubber3
August 21, 2013, 08:59 PM
A revolver has a lot less that can go wrong with it and most defensive shootings last less than 6 rounds and a matter of seconds. I carry an AL most of the time hough.

I have a S&W 442 airweight that's on my GFs hip most of the time as she needs the simplicity more than I.

southoftheboarder
August 21, 2013, 09:43 PM
I have been thinking of buying an AL but after reading the various statements I'm having second thoughts. I recently got my concealed permit. What are your recommendation's for revolvers?

Hondo 60
August 21, 2013, 10:00 PM
I carry either an SP101 - 357 or a S&W Model 38
Why?
Cuz they fit nicely in my pocket.
And it's 5 for sure.

Scrubber3
August 21, 2013, 10:02 PM
I have been thinking of buying an AL but after reading the various statements I'm having second thoughts. I recently got my concealed permit. What are your recommendation's for revolvers?

Do some research on the line of S&W hammer-less revolvers and see what you like best. Also the ruger LCR is nice as well. (These are just my recommendations of course)Then go handle some and shoot one if possible. That should set you straight with what will be best for you.

LT.Diver
August 21, 2013, 10:23 PM
All I carry are revolvers. An airweight J-Frame in the summer and a 3" Model 65 the rest of the year. Just pull the trigger and it shoots every time. No safties, slide releases, decockers, etc. And no brass on the ground.

lumpylead
August 21, 2013, 10:47 PM
LCR .357 not very "cool" but it will work everytime

zxcvbob
August 21, 2013, 10:53 PM
I carry a 4" Ruger Security Six, loaded with +P .38 Specials. I shoot it better than most of my semiautos, and I have a holster for it that I like. It conceals OK under an untucked knit shirt as long as it's not too thin or clingy of a material.

DNS
August 21, 2013, 11:07 PM
LCR.

I think a polymer revolver is the best I could carry until someone markets a laser gun or Klingon disruptor.

mboe794
August 21, 2013, 11:31 PM
I carry a model 637. IWB, so I dont worry too much about hammer snags. And I like to play with it on the range a little too. Why carry it? Simplicity and reliability mostly. I also like the fact that it can sling 158gr bullets. I'd like to see a .380 or pocket nine do that....

I used to carry a semi auto, so when I first switched the lower capacity had me a little unsetteled. But after reviewing the facts of attack encounters, and practicing with the speedloaders, I have come to terms with it. I even started bringing a speedloader with me most of the time. However, I may revisit that decision.

At 28, I wouldnt consider myself an old geezer. Yet I appreciate all a revolver has to offer.

Torian
August 21, 2013, 11:38 PM
Sometimes I want to carry magnum calibers...and sometimes I just like the simple variety. Why do you pick a particular brand of cereal at the grocery store? I'm bored and I want to try something new.

hipoint
August 22, 2013, 12:18 AM
I open carry, but mainly only on the farm. It's easier than carrying a rifle doing chores.

I prefer a revolver over a semi because of 2 things, I can shoot the revolver much more accurately and there aren't many semi's capable of 100 yard kill shots on large varmints...

completely off of your intended question I know, but for me that's why I choose to.

bannockburn
August 22, 2013, 12:23 AM
When I first started carrying it was almost exclusively revolvers, like a Charter Arms Undercover or a S&W Model 38. More of a personal preference than anything else. Then later I came to appreciate the flatness and quick reloading capabilities of compact semi-autos like the Walther PPKs. Nowadays I still carry a revolver sometimes, though more often than not it's a semi-auto in .380 or 9mm. Usually I switch between a S&W Model 638, a KelTec P3AT, and a Kahr PM9 in my CCW rotation.

JERRY
August 22, 2013, 12:34 AM
I carry a semi-auto on and off duty, dept issued. however, I off duty I do on occasion carry a NAA mini .22mag as an onion fields gun or a LWS32....

dawei
August 22, 2013, 02:40 AM
As an active duty Army Warrant Officer I carried two handguns; a 1911 45ACP, and a S&W® Mdl 10 38 Special (When assigned to an Aviation Battalion). As an LEO I carried a S&W® Mdl 10 38 Special, Mdl 19 & 686 357 Magnum; and a S&W® Mdl 37 38 Special as my BUG/ODG. I prefer revolvers. As a happily retired civilian I carry two revolvers upon my person every waking moment of every day.

Primary is a Taurus® Compact Frame (SW® equivalent K Frame) Mdl 617SS2 7 shot 357 Magnum loaded with Fiocchi® 357 Magnum 158gr XTP®/HP (#357XTP). BUG us a Taurus® Mdl 85SS2UL (SW® equivalent J Frame) 38 Special loaded with Buffalo Bore® 158gr LSWCHCGC (#20C/20). ALL RELOADS, both speed loaders & speed strips; are 38 Special for obvious reasons.

paravil
August 22, 2013, 06:37 AM
I was thinking about putting it to a vote, to see the age differences of revolver carry, too see if, when all of you old geezers are gone, will anybody even be carrying revolvers anymore..I'm thinking my generation is pretty much fascinated by the semi autos only. I'm 36.

Age--or generation, rather--does seem to play a part here. But I'm 32 and chose a revolver for my first carry gun almost three years ago, a SW 642. Ease of use and reliability were big reasons, but also it's lightweight and can be concealed in any type of clothing. I grew up shooting mostly revolvers with my dad. I'll still take his Model 10 over any modern semi any day of the week.

coyote315
August 22, 2013, 06:51 AM
30-something yo here; I carry an airweight .38 chief's special, because it is light and small and well-rounded and stays out of my way- when I am living daily rural life I don't want my pistol to be an intrusive part of my existence. So far, I've used it weekly on oppossums and feral cats and it's plenty for that. If I get in a defensive gunfight, 5 shots will be plenty for me to either finish them off at close range, or be far enough away to break contact.
I'm not patrolling Samarrah any more so I don't feel the need to be armed past that, nor do I want to mess w/ the weight and size of an auto. The pistols may be light, but the 10+ round magazine gets heavy in a hurry!!

jbrown50
August 22, 2013, 07:11 AM
My regular carry gun is a semi-auto.

In the Winter time though when I'm wearing a heavy coat, and I know I won't be removing that coat and leave it laying/hanging somewhere unsecure, I'll stick a j-frame revolver, loaded with 38 +Ps, into my coat pocket. It's easier to get to, small, lightweight, simple to operate, and has a longer heavier but smooth trigger pull. At that point my semi-auto becomes my backup gun.

Drail
August 22, 2013, 10:28 AM
I built and shot competition 1911s for years but I have always used revolvers for carry work. Because they rarely fail and they come in really useful calibers. (.44 Spl. and .41 Rem.) My main carry gun since 1996 has been a S&W 696. Haven't found anything better.

Risky buisness
August 22, 2013, 11:23 AM
I don't engage in tactical style shooting, I do however get a good round count from cover concealment practice concentrating on speed and reload ability. Im not from a big town, where perhaps multiple assailants may be more likely to be encountered, so Im perfectly content with my M19 2" Smith .357, It has been my usual carry handgun for 20 or so years and when the occasion demands a smaller profile revolver for going to town from my rural home a M36 Smith 5 shot is my choice. I own and fire several auto pistols, but MY circumstances and needs , ie the ability to carry several load types on board may be different than many of you. I trust the revolver, and depend on them for my safety.

farm23
August 22, 2013, 11:25 AM
I carry a 44 629 3" every day but is isn't well concealed and does not have to be. It is in a Simply Rugged OWB and doesn't get in the way. I have a lot of options but this one works for me.

1858
August 22, 2013, 01:23 PM
I think I'm coming to the end of my journey to figure out what I want to carry on a daily basis. I got my CC license about 18 months ago and have carried 1911s (full size and Commander), SIGs (P220, P225 and P239), an SP101, an XD-S and finally a Ruger KLCR. By the far the most enjoyable to carry from a weight and concealment perspective is the Ruger KLCR and it's also enjoyable and easy to shoot. One thing I've noticed with revolvers over semi autos is the difference in weight distribution when carrying. A pistol has much more weight in the grip due to the magazine and ammunition so they tend to want to rotate away from the body. A revolver, and particularly the KLCR, has most of the weight in the frame and cylinder so the weight is right where it should be i.e. at the belt line rather than above it. I think I've found the best carry piece for me. Now I need to buy another so that I can have one on the hip and one in an ankle holster and I'll most likely sell the XD-S.

telkontar
August 22, 2013, 02:18 PM
Hand-fit is a prime consideration; what do you shoot better? A revolver was my first handgun for ease of use and reliability and remains my "go-to" gun.
Guns are a gut feel but those of us born in the 60s did not grow up watching TV with clips popping out of the gun.

farm23
August 22, 2013, 03:26 PM
You have done a lot work with the KLCR and I think you will be happy with your choice. If I were in town more I would probably also go with the KLCR. I said in another thread my wife now wants a KLCR with the XS sight like yours. Enjoy

SuedePflow
August 22, 2013, 03:52 PM
My EDC is a revolver right now. And Airweight 637 to be exact. And I'm only 30 years old.

I just find it far more comfortable for some of the clothes I wear in summer weather. And I shot it accurately and comfortably. I found my 637 to be a better shooter than many of the other pocket guns that I've tried (notibly the Kahr CM9, Keltec P3AT, Ruger LCP, and Diamondback DB380)

In the colder months when I'm wearing a jacket, I OWB carry a Glock 19 though.

southoftheboarder
August 22, 2013, 09:44 PM
Thanks for all the recommendations and feed back. Now if I can just find a dealer who has a them in stock.To dawei (Dave), I like your quote.


Only two defining forces have ever died for you:
1. Jesus Christ
2. The American Soldier, Sailor, Airman, and Marine

Jaymo
August 22, 2013, 09:48 PM
I like to CC a revolver because they don't make autos in .44 Spl.
That, and power level and bullet design don't affect reliability.

btg3
August 22, 2013, 10:19 PM
The Lone Range is my hero and he don't carry no stinkin' semi-auto. Like as not, silver boolits only work in six-shooters anyhow and they done stopped most every kind of bad guy you can imagine. I've seen nails hammered in with a wheel gun, so you can shoe a horse if needed, but never had to throw one like a rock, because the 'liability is guaranteed -- lest you be needin' upwards of 6 shots.

tomrkba
August 22, 2013, 11:10 PM
I prefer a wheel gun over an AL. I know a good deal of LE that have told me of various incidents, in which they, or someone they know has had an AL fail to cycle when they needed it the most. Certain aspects of how the firearm is supported in a heated moment can create a limp wrist syndrome, which caused a cycling problem. I've actually recreated this scenario, and it is indeed a realistic concern of mine.

Some guns will do it and others won't. I test my guns and seem to have had good luck.

BigN
August 23, 2013, 04:40 AM
I don't even own a semi anything. Always worried about them going off when I don't want them to.

dab102999
August 23, 2013, 06:06 AM
I don't have a dog in this fight cus I will carry either one. But one really nice thing about a wheel gun for my family is it got my wife years ago comfortable with carrying a AL with one in the chamber. For the first 6 months or so she would never have one racked. I expressed my concerns many times about that. When she bought a 638 and carried it for a while I asked her why she was comfortable carrying a wheel gun ready to go but not an AL. She couldn't give me an answer and from that day forward always had her AL ready with one in the chamber. That wheel gun saved me a lot of grief.

19-3Ben
August 23, 2013, 06:24 AM
29 years old here.
My primary carry is a 1973 Ruger Speed Six.

When I need something really small though, I carry the LCP. So i do switch to auto for super concealed carry. But the Speed Six definitely gets the lions share.

RKBABob
August 23, 2013, 09:54 AM
1. Looks matter. I don't care if nobody else sees it, but I have to see it, and I prefer the looks of traditional blued steel and fancy grips over the plastic bricks of most modern semi-automatics.

2. Simplicity of controls. A Centennial revolver has one primary control, the trigger. Even someone who has never handled a gun before will instantly understand how it works. There are no safeties (does this one go up or down to fire?), slide releases, decockers, loaded chamber indicators, cocked indicators, or other levers sticking out all over the place.

3. It can be easily customized. Turning one screw allows even someone with no gunsmithing ability to change the looks and shape of the gun by adding new grips. The grips can be exchanged for ones that are smaller, larger, rougher, smoother, stickier, more slippery, or just plain prettier.

4. Will fire any ammo. There is no need to find ammo that works well with your particular gun. As long as it fits in the chamber, you can fire pretty much anything from weak target loads to wrist-breaking +p+, and in any bullet profile from pointy to flat.

5. You don't have to carry the weight of superfluous ammunition.:neener: Unless you routinely run up against al Qaida or Mexican cartels, you don't need a semi-automatic with 16 rounds at your disposal. 5 or 6 shots will be plenty enough to put adequate distance between you and whatever is chasing you.

6. Live cartridges don't leave the place you put them and hide elsewhere in the gun. It is obvious to the user, even if tired or stressed, whether a revolver is loaded or unloaded. Cartridges stay in the cylinder until you take them out, unlike a semi-automatic, where one must remember to remove the magazine and check the chamber (and in that order).

7. No magazine release to accidentally engage. Its just about impossible to accidentally release a cylinder, and would be blindingly obvious to the user if it could happen.

8. Looong, heavy trigger pull prevents accidents. Shooting yourself while reholstering is called "Glock leg" not "revolver leg," and there is a reason for that.

RealGun
August 23, 2013, 10:02 AM
Potatohead - I was thinking about putting it to a vote, to see the age differences of revolver carry, too see if, when all of you old geezers are gone, will anybody even be carrying revolvers anymore..I'm thinking my generation is pretty much fascinated by the semi autos only. I'm 36.

The generation difference has a lot to do with styles of dress and willingness to dress for concealment rather than make the gun small enough for shorts, a tee shirt, and flip-flops. It always comes down to whether one has a false sense of security and bravado or is truly prepared to decisively stop a threat.

flhtcuibyhd
August 23, 2013, 11:04 AM
I guess I'm in the old geezer group on two fronts - lcr 357 and you can guess the other.

Dave T
August 23, 2013, 05:22 PM
I carried one model or other of Colt 1911 in 45 ACP for all but the first 9 months of my LEO career and for over 10 years after retiring. About a year ago I finally admitted my 1911 days are over because of the swollen knuckles of arthritis. The 1911 frame pounds the base knuckle of my shooting hand thumb something awful and I can't even practice any more.

Fortunately revolvers still fit my hand so that is what I'm now carrying and shooting. I still like 45 ACP so my daily carry is often a 325 NG S&W. The other choice, particularly if I'm carrying IWB is a newly finished custom, 3" RB 681 S&W.

Dave

JVaughn
August 23, 2013, 05:36 PM
I carry a revolver because they don't make a .357 magnum in SA.

HexHead
August 23, 2013, 05:40 PM
When I was 36, and 46 for that matter, I had no interest in revolvers. Now I have twice as many of them than semis, and I'm not done yet. We'll give you time.

Revolvers. When it absolutely, positively has to go off, the second time.

I was thinking about putting it to a vote, to see the age differences of revolver carry, too see if, when all of you old geezers are gone, will anybody even be carrying revolvers anymore..I'm thinking my generation is pretty much fascinated by the semi autos only. I'm 36.

Nathanael_Greene
August 23, 2013, 06:23 PM
Most of the time, I carry a S&W Model 37 Airweight. Only five shots, but light and compact and disappears in a pocket.

For a little extra oomph, sometimes I pack a S&W 6904, a dozen 9mm diplomats on call.

AABEN
August 23, 2013, 06:54 PM
The revolver does NOT leave any brass behind!

Haywood
August 23, 2013, 10:55 PM
I always liked Revolvers better. But, I have carried and I do own Two Semi-Autos. I have a "thing" for Snubs. I carry Two Snubs every day. 357 is my favorite but, I like 38 +P also. If I lived in a high crime area or had a bad experience I may want to carry my Glock again. I have never needed a gun so at this point I feel well protected carrying Two 357 mags and reloads. When I go to Florida for the Winter I will bring the Glock and Ten loaded mags. The Glock will probably stay in the Car Safe but if I feel the need it's there. I just like carrying and shooting Snubs. All my Snubs are DAO.

southoftheboarder
August 23, 2013, 11:02 PM
What are your opinions regarding the type of hammers- internal, exposed or shrouded.

Deltaboy
August 23, 2013, 11:08 PM
Convenience It is one I carry the most.

Rodfac
August 24, 2013, 10:34 AM
For real CC, both my wife and I carry Smith J-frames: a 3" M36 for me, and a M637 for her...that's in urban environments, and is a rarity...ie. we seldom carry. I've found that my M36 Smith, even with it's cylinder bulge and 3" tube is as easy to conceal as my Sig P290, and with good 125 gr JHP's, it expands equally well. Since I've found it more reliable, that revolver goes when any of the autos stays home.

While fishing, it's the same choices...but for woods loafing here on our farm, I often carry whatever I"m currently using; anything from a 1920's vintage .30 Luger, to a 6-1/2" bbl'd. Ruger .44 Magnum, in good gun leather. For the most part, while out in the fields, I don't relish the chore of hunting up spent brass from my auto-loaders, so they rarely get a trip out and about.

Hunting, at least out west for elk, is a different story. Having packed elk quarters back to the jeep at dusk in bear country is a scary proposition...and my .35 Whelen, Remington Classic M700 is just too heavy to tote, so I pack a heavily loaded Ruger .41 or .44 Magnum. Ten years ago, after dressing out a medium sized cow elk, and packing out the first of the hind quarters, I returned to the carcase to find fresh bear tracks on my route out to the skid road....no gun...and it gave me the willies for the next load, believe me. I packed it all out, and had no trouble,(one of the stupider things I've done over the years,) but it convinced me that a good magnum might bring some piece of mind to my next hunt...

On our home range, where we do 99% of our shooting, anything goes...I'm a die-hard reloader, and collect as much of my fired brass as possible and the pea gravel on our home range set up makes that pretty easy.

The Pics below show my rigs...for the P290 and the M36 with 3" bbl.

HTH's Rod

http://i261.photobucket.com/albums/ii64/Rodfac/Holster%20work/P1010251.jpg (http://s261.photobucket.com/user/Rodfac/media/Holster%20work/P1010251.jpg.html)
My P290 with our home-made holster.

http://i261.photobucket.com/albums/ii64/Rodfac/Holster%20work/P8091544-1.jpg (http://s261.photobucket.com/user/Rodfac/media/Holster%20work/P8091544-1.jpg.html)
My wife's M637, again with one of our home-made rigs.

http://i261.photobucket.com/albums/ii64/Rodfac/Holster%20work/P1020389-1.jpg (http://s261.photobucket.com/user/Rodfac/media/Holster%20work/P1020389-1.jpg.html)
My M36, with my version of a Tom Threepersons open top.

Frank44
August 25, 2013, 07:07 AM
Those are real nice rigs you made for you and your wife Rodfac!!

treg
August 25, 2013, 03:23 PM
I prefer a hammerless revolver for CC. They hide very easy and are simple to operate. If you can pull the trigger it will go bang, five times. Doesn't matter if its in a pocket, jammed against the aggressor, which finger your pulling the trigger with, or anything else, it will work.

gamestalker
August 25, 2013, 04:34 PM
My Daughter in law bought an XDM in .40 cal and when I took her out to shoot it for the first time, it continuously jammed on her. Thinking it might be an ammo problem, but kind of leaning toward how she was holding it, and her reactions when pulling the trigger, I decided to load a few dummies to see what she was doing. Sure enough, it was all her. I grabbed it and emptied a couple mags with flawless function too. After some coaching, and letting her see her reactions with dummy rounds, it stopped malfunctioning.

Another incident back in the 80's when a woman I knew bought a NIB G17 that wouldn't reliably cycle for her ended up being the same cause.

So in my honest opinion based on observation and experience, a wheel gun as a primary SD weapon is the way to go for many.

GS

Dr_B
August 26, 2013, 03:46 PM
I carry a revolver most of the time. I shoot them well, I like the reliability and the ease of using different kinds of ammo. And revolvers are sexy. There ya go.

tomrkba
August 26, 2013, 10:31 PM
1. Looks matter. I don't care if nobody else sees it, but I have to see it, and I prefer the looks of traditional blued steel and fancy grips over the plastic bricks of most modern semi-automatics.

I like revolvers too. I think 1911's look great (but generally suck), as do SIG P-Series guns. Others are merely average.


2. Simplicity of controls. A Centennial revolver has one primary control, the trigger. Even someone who has never handled a gun before will instantly understand how it works. There are no safeties (does this one go up or down to fire?), slide releases, decockers, loaded chamber indicators, cocked indicators, or other levers sticking out all over the place.


SIGs do this as well as many other pistols. Semi-autos are not complicated and this "pro" is merely a false justification for the platform.


3. It can be easily customized. Turning one screw allows even someone with no gunsmithing ability to change the looks and shape of the gun by adding new grips. The grips can be exchanged for ones that are smaller, larger, rougher, smoother, stickier, more slippery, or just plain prettier.


I don't see this as an advantage over anything since the same can be said for any semi-auto pistol with removable grips.


4. Will fire any ammo. There is no need to find ammo that works well with your particular gun. As long as it fits in the chamber, you can fire pretty much anything from weak target loads to wrist-breaking +p+, and in any bullet profile from pointy to flat.


I've fired ammo from my revolvers and had the bullet jump the crimp. This resulted in the gun locking up. But, the differences in bullet shape, wide variety of width and, most importantly, tolerance for different charge levels is a distinct advantage. Create some super-light loads for new shooters and crank some loads up for BIG BOOM fun on the range.


5. You don't have to carry the weight of superfluous ammunition. Unless you routinely run up against al Qaida or Mexican cartels, you don't need a semi-automatic with 16 rounds at your disposal. 5 or 6 shots will be plenty enough to put adequate distance between you and whatever is chasing you.


Again, another poor argument. As Jim Cirillo put it (paraphrasing): "You will want the biggest gun with the most ammunition in a real fight."

There is no reason not to at least throw a speed strip into a pocket or belt pouch. Belief that six shots is all you will need does not account for the circumstances of YOUR fight. The bad guy(s) get a say in the outcome and it's very possible to miss despite the propaganda that "revolver shooters are more accurate". It's very, very easy to miss with any handgun.

The reality of the situation is that carrying spare ammunition in a comfortable way while concealing effectively is very difficult. Speed loaders are bulky and annoying. Carrying them in the pocket results in bullet nose deformation over time, printing and inconsistent presentation. This slows my reload time down too much. I recently acquired Safariland #371 split holders for my S&W N-Frame. They still print, but not as badly as speed loader holders that are 100% outside the belt. The state of moon clip holders today is pathetic. Concealment is difficult. I end up wrapping them with a loop of kydex to protect the clip and drop them into the pocket. Consistent presentation is still a problem. Speed strips are very slow and require a different attitude. Rather than loading all six shots, load only two to get the gun loaded as quickly as possible. De Bethencourt talks about his in his classes and videos.



6. Live cartridges don't leave the place you put them and hide elsewhere in the gun. It is obvious to the user, even if tired or stressed, whether a revolver is loaded or unloaded. Cartridges stay in the cylinder until you take them out, unlike a semi-automatic, where one must remember to remove the magazine and check the chamber (and in that order).


As if clearing a semi-automatic is difficult. It is not and anyone with some training will be able to do it without thinking. Furthermore, many people have been negligently killed with "unloaded" revolvers. Again, this is a false endorsement for the revolver.


7. No magazine release to accidentally engage. Its just about impossible to accidentally release a cylinder, and would be blindingly obvious to the user if it could happen.


This can happen with a semi-automatic, but it is easy to prevent if the gun fits the hand of the shooter. A well built holster will fully cover the magazine release and never touch the button.


8. Looong, heavy trigger pull prevents accidents. Shooting yourself while reholstering is called "Glock leg" not "revolver leg," and there is a reason for that.

SIG P-Series pistols and many others offer long, heavy trigger pulls. Holstering safely is a skill and attitude, regardless of platform.

and

The revolver does NOT leave any brass behind!

Done properly, a speed reload will spray brass all over the place. You should see my shooting station when I'm through practicing reloads with my revolvers--it's a mess!


It is best to argue for the revolver based upon its actual strengths. In this day and age, given the current technology and development of guns and bullets, the revolver's strengths are:

1) Powerful cartridges...or very weak loads for pleasant target shooting.
2) Wide variety of bullets in lead, jacketed and hybrid styles.
3) Long barrels fixed to the frame with good sights for accurate shooting.
4) Tuned triggers for very nice single action pulls for accurate shots.
5) Custom grips that can be made to exact hand measurements (Herrett's for example).
6) Lots of clickety-clickety noises and a rotating thingie for FUN on the range.
7) Wide variety of sight options, though this applies to semi-autos too.
8) Very long barrel lengths for precision shooting and high performance.
9) Tuned chambers optimized for lead resulting in lower cost to the shooter.
10) Very light to very heavy guns for variance in recoil.
11) Very short barrel lengths on any frame for concealed carry (or any other purpose you can think of). This can cause problems in semi-autos since it messes with timing and ballistic performance.
12) Doesn't throw brass around if you're sport shooting. This results in fewer lost cases and an overall lower cost to shoot. You're going to lose cases if you properly practice speed loading.

tarosean
August 27, 2013, 01:12 AM
I carry a revolver because they don't make a .357 magnum in SA.

Sure they do...

http://www.coonaninc.com/products.php/pistol/

The Good
August 27, 2013, 05:45 AM
My first gun was a smith 642 because i wanted a carry gun. Ive had a few autos and carried them, but went back to my revolver because its the gun i know the best. Ive spent tons of hours on all of my guns, but my j frame is by nature extremely simple from an operators standpoint. After a certain amount of time with any device, operating it becomes second nature and you also develop muscle memory. Because my 642 has fewer functions than any of my autoloaders, it became 2nd nature faster. Recently i decided i wanted a new firearm just for home defense. I considered a 12 gauge shotgun, but I chose a larger smith and wesson revolver because it's operation is the same as my carry gun with the addition of an exposed hammer. I dont have time right now to spend at a range developing a good rapport with a shotgun. When i'm in a home defense situation, and anything going wrong can mean my life, having a gun i don't have to think about is invaluable.

So my answer to this thread would be the same. There may be a number of great autoloaders that make better carry/defense guns, but it's important to consider the most significant variable which is your self. I know a .45 acp 1911 has more stopping power than my .38 spl revolver, but if i'm not fully accustomed to operating it, it's useless, and the same would be true the other way around if the guns were swapped. Thats why i carry a smith tevolver, but would never preach to anyone that they should do the same

Elm Creek Smith
August 27, 2013, 06:19 PM
I was perfectly happy with a full-sized M1911A1 or a CZ-75 for years, then the Army took my .45 away and gave me an M9 Beretta. Then I found out my wife couldn't get past the brass ejecting from a semi. (Believe me, I tried.)

I had a brief flirtation with a Glock 23, but just couldn't get past the looks. Deciding that life was too short to carry an ugly gun, I dug out my 3 inch S&W Model 13-3. It became my primary carry gun, and I added a Taurus 85SSUL as secondary/backup. Then I briefly added a 4 inch S&W Model 681 to the mix, but I lost it after I put Crimson Trace grips on it. (My wife likes it a lot!) My last semiauto pistol was a KelTec P32 that I swapped nearly straight across for a S&W Model 37. Seriously! Then I finally found the 4 inch S&W Model 10-5 of my dreams, almost. I'm still looking for one with a 4 inch tapered barrel and a round butt.

My duty sidearm is a 4 inch S&W Model 686 and my S&W Model 37 rides in a pocket. Off duty, I almost always carry the Model 13-3 and the Model 37. Sometimes the Model 10-5 rides in place of the Model 13-3, and sometimes one of the three rides solo.

ECS

FM12
August 27, 2013, 09:32 PM
Have to carry a "dog" (damed old glock") on duty but off duty is mostly revos. From colt snubby to S&W 686.

mchertel52
August 27, 2013, 09:52 PM
Agreed, I am 50 and liken my 7 shot .357 snubby to the "Wasp" cap gun that we used to carry around as kids. The big difference is the recoil!!! lol

tomrkba
August 27, 2013, 10:45 PM
My duty sidearm is a 4 inch S&W Model 686 and my S&W Model 37 rides in a pocket. Off duty, I almost always carry the Model 13-3 and the Model 37. Sometimes the Model 10-5 rides in place of the Model 13-3, and sometimes one of the three rides solo.

ECS,

How do you carry your 686? What holster do you use?

Dirty Bob
August 27, 2013, 11:26 PM
One big plus of the revolver is that you don't have to spend a small fortune on spare mags to ensure a reliable gun. Speedloaders or speed strips can be had for a modest cost.

I'm a huge fan of the Ruger SP101. The post-type tang allows just about any shape/size of stocks. I like the hard nylon, pebbled Hogue Monogrip. Inexpensive, tough, looks pretty good, and it fits my hands.

With a 3-1/16" barrel, the Monogrip, a tritium Big Dot front sight, and a bobbed hammer, I have what is for me the best compromise for a carry gun. I carry with .38+P hollowpoints. I carry in a Kholster IWB holster, and it disappears under a t-shirt. Great gun.

All my best,
Dirty Bob

RealGun
August 28, 2013, 10:22 AM
With a 3-1/16" barrel, the Monogrip, a tritium Big Dot front sight, and a bobbed hammer, I have what is for me the best compromise for a carry gun. I carry with .38+P hollowpoints

Perhaps instead of a "great gun" it is a platform for customizing, not even using the intended ammo (.357 Magnum).

Dirty Bob
August 28, 2013, 09:24 PM
RealGun:
I still consider the SP101 "great." I would be very happy with it if a stock revolver was all I could get, but I loved being able to customize it. The base revolver, though was very impressive. It has the best trigger I've encountered on a Ruger DA revolver. I love the way that Ruger DAs decisively LOCK well before the hammer falls.

Regards,
Dirty Bob

leadcounsel
August 29, 2013, 12:48 AM
Revolvers are definitely a sexy throwback, and the .357 magnum is outstanding as a manstopper.

That said, I mainly carry a no-nonsense Glock or other semiauto capable of faster shots and reloads (in my hand/training). The finish is tougher, the gun conceals easier, and I have over double the initial shot capacity before a reload, and it's just as reliable as a revolver (I'm speaking of my Glock 23, not all semiautos).

I have carried a revolver, and sometimes do, but not typically.

Tony_the_tiger
August 29, 2013, 01:28 AM
I was looking for a new firearm and almost pulled the trigger on a Glock 23. But, I just couldn't do it. I consider myself somewhat of a purist. I understand the action of revolvers. I understand their capabilities. I understand what makes them go boom and, frankly, with all the engineering that goes into a semi-automatic, I do not have the time to learn them as I have learned revolvers. I know I can EDC a revolver safely. Training with a semi-auto at this point, for me, would require more time than I am able to devote to it. I feel like I could use a semi-auto if needed in a combat situation. However, I do not feel comfortable having one strapped to me around my children. This in no way reflects any inherent flaw in the semi-auto, but rather my own unfamiliarity and subjectively perceived acceptable margin of error.

I also considered that, ammo prices being what they are today, I am wary of investing in more calibers. I am heavily invested in .357, .38, .44 special, and 12 gauge rounds. That's enough, for me, for the foreseeable future. So, I ended up getting a spur-less 2.25" Ruger SP101 - something I have long admired but could never justify until now, due to personal reasons. This simplifies carrying a S&W 442 as a bug and reduces weight, since the same speed-loaders may be applied to either firearm. SP101 left side super-tucked, 442 right side pocket.

tomrkba
August 29, 2013, 09:12 AM
RealGun:
I still consider the SP101 "great." I would be very happy with it if a stock revolver was all I could get, but I loved being able to customize it. The base revolver, though was very impressive. It has the best trigger I've encountered on a Ruger DA revolver. I love the way that Ruger DAs decisively LOCK well before the hammer falls.

Regards,
Dirty Bob


I think the SP101 is a terrible design. It is neither large nor small, yet manages to not hold six rounds. The sights are bad, the grip interferes with speed loaders, the crane is too short, and it is too heavy for anything but pocket carry. It is not heavy enough for good recoil reduction with hot loads, but does work reasonably well with mid-range loads. I would rather have the more versatile 640-1 or a K-Frame.

1858
August 29, 2013, 10:17 AM
It is not heavy enough for good recoil reduction with hot loads

With a Hogue grip it's a pussy cat compared to the LCR even with the hottest loads. I would agree that it's kind of in no man's land in terms of weight being too heavy (for me) for concealed carry and not large enough for open carry while camping, hiking, hunting etc. It's a neat revolver though.

ldlfh7
August 29, 2013, 10:20 AM
I prefer a revolver because it always works and never jams. I understand people wanting to have large capacity handguns but lets be honest, if we ever find ourselves where we have to draw I doubt more than 5-6 shots will be needed. If more shots are needed, I will choose to run away and try to save myself. Real life is not a video game lol.

farm23
August 29, 2013, 10:35 AM
I am fortunate to live in the country and seldom go to town so my situation is different than most. I carry a 1911 when in town but am looking for a light weight 44. The 1911 gives me no trouble if I am careful on what I feed it, but I do have to buy and store ammo for the 1911 and the 44 I carry on the farm. I am looking to making my life simpler and the revolver helps make it simple. I know the 1911 can be reliable if you do your part but I have found the revolver more reliable.

chg
August 29, 2013, 03:07 PM
I'm 61 years old and grew up with revolvers. Colts, S&W, Rugers, and Dan Wessons (DW for IHMSA shooting only). Several have come and gone, sure regret getting rid of an old blued colt and a few S&Ws but others replaced them. Since 1998 I've settled on the 3" Ruger SP101 in .357 magnum loaded with Lyman's #358156 for the woods. With Speer 125 gr Gold Dots for carry in town, it shoots to point of aim at 15 yards and groups just as well as the cast loads do.

Ran the loop with aftermarket grips and have settled on the factory grips as best for me. In fact, I'm on my 3rd set of factory grips. This revolver spent the first 13 years in my cruiser vest, every day, lower left front inside pocket. It took the bumps, falls, dunkings, heavy down pours, snow, trail dust, and sweat. The gun was secure in a nylon holster sewn into the vest and never fell out but does show wear.

It got cleaned as needed every evening. The rubber grips would start to chunk apart and crumble from the abuse so an order to Brownell's fixed that. A spring set was put in the day I took it out of the box new. I replaced the factory front sight with an orange C more sight too.

Why did I choose this revolver? I used to carry an N frame Smith. The fine blueing, the polish, the size, and the weight all got to me. The Ruger fit what I needed it for. 357 isn't the best in the wilds but again the compromise won out. Stainless steel, (my first stainless gun) fixed sights, compact enough to not be in the way yet large enough to shoot accurately and handle the .357's recoil. I never thought a 357 recoiled until touching one off in a J frame. Yeah .38 special! Despite the hard use, it's still tight and shoots very well. I used to disassemble it down to it's component groups and clean them every few months. Now just annually.

It fits in my fly vest while fishing. It loves water much more than my blued guns do.

I can wear shorts and a t shirt with this revolver in a Milt Sparks VM II holster and it does not show in the least. The round rubber grip does not wear the fabric on the seat of the pick-up like my .45 was doing.

I have 4 handguns that I consider carry guns and do use as such. The other 3 are autos, a .380, 9mm, and a .45 1911-A1. I do carry them but not nearly as often as this revolver. The .45 auto would be 2nd choice. If just plain carry in town the .45 auto got used quite often until I had surgery on my right hand. When the dr said it was okay to resume shooting centerfire again I found out right away there were problems.... my hand was still a little swollen and the grip safety would not release. Squeeze that trigger until blue in the face and nothing happened. That has since passed but there's no grip safety on the revolver. One other reason why the revolver, I know it's been mentioned before here, but I live in a rural area and access to the woods is just a short walk away. Finding brass scattered all over is time consuming so the autos stay out of the woods. I am a brass maggot, was a brass maggot before it got scarce.

RealGun
August 30, 2013, 10:18 AM
tomrkba - I think the SP101 is a terrible design. It is neither large nor small, yet manages to not hold six rounds. The sights are bad, the grip interferes with speed loaders, the crane is too short, and it is too heavy for anything but pocket carry. It is not heavy enough for good recoil reduction with hot loads, but does work reasonably well with mid-range loads. I would rather have the more versatile 640-1 or a K-Frame.

QuickStrips by Tuff are better suited than speedloaders, which are difficult to conceal.

It is too heavy for pocket carry, which I expect is what you meant.

Ruger has a six shot gun in the GP100. Try that at 9 more ounces.

stinger 327
August 30, 2013, 03:32 PM
The revolver does NOT leave any brass behind!
So very true. One would think a revolver would be a criminals choice for a gun since it leaves less evidence behind and very easy to use.

tomrkba
August 30, 2013, 09:42 PM
QuickStrips by Tuff are better suited than speedloaders, which are difficult to conceal.

It is too heavy for pocket carry, which I expect is what you meant.

Ruger has a six shot gun in the GP100. Try that at 9 more ounces.

Hi RealGun,

I have owned two SP101's and have a GP100. I like the GP100, but think the SP101 is inadequate for what it is. It's just wrong for a belt gun and doesn't do deep concealment well. Maybe its place is on a plate carrier ;) I would much prefer to see a K-Frame sized (six round capacity) gun from Ruger replace it.

http://i1205.photobucket.com/albums/bb425/tomrkba/firearms/revolvers/Ruger-Alaskan/Armor-and-Alaskan.jpg
Being silly with the Ruger Alaskan in 44 Magnum. The gun makes the carrier very front heavy and awkward.

stinger 327
August 30, 2013, 09:48 PM
For real CC, both my wife and I carry Smith J-frames: a 3" M36 for me, and a M637 for her...that's in urban environments, and is a rarity...ie. we seldom carry. I've found that my M36 Smith, even with it's cylinder bulge and 3" tube is as easy to conceal as my Sig P290, and with good 125 gr JHP's, it expands equally well. Since I've found it more reliable, that revolver goes when any of the autos stays home.

While fishing, it's the same choices...but for woods loafing here on our farm, I often carry whatever I"m currently using; anything from a 1920's vintage .30 Luger, to a 6-1/2" bbl'd. Ruger .44 Magnum, in good gun leather. For the most part, while out in the fields, I don't relish the chore of hunting up spent brass from my auto-loaders, so they rarely get a trip out and about.

Hunting, at least out west for elk, is a different story. Having packed elk quarters back to the jeep at dusk in bear country is a scary proposition...and my .35 Whelen, Remington Classic M700 is just too heavy to tote, so I pack a heavily loaded Ruger .41 or .44 Magnum. Ten years ago, after dressing out a medium sized cow elk, and packing out the first of the hind quarters, I returned to the carcase to find fresh bear tracks on my route out to the skid road....no gun...and it gave me the willies for the next load, believe me. I packed it all out, and had no trouble,(one of the stupider things I've done over the years,) but it convinced me that a good magnum might bring some piece of mind to my next hunt...

On our home range, where we do 99% of our shooting, anything goes...I'm a die-hard reloader, and collect as much of my fired brass as possible and the pea gravel on our home range set up makes that pretty easy.

The Pics below show my rigs...for the P290 and the M36 with 3" bbl.

HTH's Rod

http://i261.photobucket.com/albums/ii64/Rodfac/Holster%20work/P1010251.jpg (http://s261.photobucket.com/user/Rodfac/media/Holster%20work/P1010251.jpg.html)
My P290 with our home-made holster.

http://i261.photobucket.com/albums/ii64/Rodfac/Holster%20work/P8091544-1.jpg (http://s261.photobucket.com/user/Rodfac/media/Holster%20work/P8091544-1.jpg.html)
My wife's M637, again with one of our home-made rigs.

http://i261.photobucket.com/albums/ii64/Rodfac/Holster%20work/P1020389-1.jpg (http://s261.photobucket.com/user/Rodfac/media/Holster%20work/P1020389-1.jpg.html)
My M36, with my version of a Tom Threepersons open top.
That Sig 290 is nice what does it shoot and what do those cost?

Blue Thunder
August 30, 2013, 11:17 PM
I wear my Colt Python 6 inch blue in a Bianchi X-15 that has had the elastic replaced so it holds things close over the shoulders when I am wearing my Black Tux out in public. I have a pair of Dade Speed Loaders in a twin pouch just in front of the holster tie down on the belt on the weak side (am right handed) stocked with Remington 125GR Golden Sabers. The tux jacket is cut 1 size larger and it covers everything very nicely. Elsewise it is is a Glock G-19 with 46 rounds total on board for daily work under an untucked TB or other dress shirt including some made for CCW shirts that are out there and have tear away sides or snaps on the front under buttons.

Deer_Freak
August 31, 2013, 05:58 PM
I carry a revolver because it's real hard to find a semi auto in 357 mag. You can get a semi auto in 357 sig and other magnum cartridges but you never find those calibers on sale for $18 a box of 50 that you can actually use for self defense.

Armor Snail
August 31, 2013, 06:20 PM
S&W 10-6 in a tan Galco Silhouette.
I carry mine when I want to be fancier honestly. As it has nice wood grips and has been refinished in nickel. Looks great with khakis and a polo. :)

I get a lot of compliments on it every where I go.

I do also like that if I ever have a SD shoot casings stay with me. If no one is around I see no legal reason to stay if I haven't committed a crime.
Looking at a 442 for a back up.



Sent from my Galaxy Nexus using Tapatalk 2

1858
August 31, 2013, 06:29 PM
I do also like that if I ever have a SD shoot casings stay with me. If no one is around I see no legal reason to stay if I haven't committed a crime.
Looking at a 442 for a back up.

You seriously need to rethink that one for myriad reasons.

Kleanbore
August 31, 2013, 08:13 PM
Posted by Armor Snail: I do also like that if I ever have a SD shoot casings stay with me. If no one is around I see no legal reason to stay if I haven't committed a crime.That comment shows clearly that you need to learn just a bit about use of force law.

Let's start with this little appetizer: flight is legally considered evidence of guilt.

That little annoyance aside, have you considered that your bullets do not stay with you?

PabloJ
August 31, 2013, 08:25 PM
The only compact handgun I own is S&W 940. I don't mind five w/o reload and am perfectly at peace with myself and my surroundings. I really do not want to buy something else as it is just too much hassle for me.

Armor Snail
August 31, 2013, 11:52 PM
That comment shows clearly that you need to learn just a bit about use of force law.

Let's start with this little appetizer: flight is legally considered evidence of guilt.

That little annoyance aside, have you considered that your bullets do not stay with you?

Not in PA. From the mouths of more than a few lawyers.
Defending yourself is not a crime. Shooting someone is not a crime in of itself. It is the intent that can be criminal. I know the laws quite well thank you. Nowhere does it say that I must call 911 nor stick around to explain myself.

Rule #1
Don't talk to the police. That is what lawyers are for. That's who I'm calling if god forbid I ever have to shoot. Not the police.

Sent from my Galaxy Nexus using Tapatalk 2

788Ham
September 1, 2013, 12:23 AM
Hmmm, glad you're not on my end of town! Shoot someone, justifiably or not, then walk off, no phoning in the incident? Good luck.

Armor Snail
September 1, 2013, 12:42 AM
Guess you never saw this.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6wXkI4t7nuc&feature=youtube_gdata_player


I think we are getting off topic though here. Can we get back to the pros and preferences of wheel gun carry?

Sent from my Galaxy Nexus using Tapatalk 2

RealGun
September 1, 2013, 08:37 AM
Then again, being the next George Zimmermann is not an appealing prospect.

1) Have an overly zealous DA override the police's judgment of Stand your Ground.
2) Lose your guns
3) Go to jail
4) Pay for a trial with likely racial overtones
5) Go into hiding, if found not guilty.

Back to the topic...I lately carry two revolvers...call me crazy.

Kleanbore
September 1, 2013, 10:45 AM
Posted by Armor Snail, in response to" flight is legally considered evidence of guilt": Not in PA. From the mouths of more than a few lawyers.Your understanding is badly flawed. See this (http://ccadp.org/fredcommon.htm).

Defending yourself is not a crime.No, not as long as your action was your only recourse, you used no more force than was necessary, you had not been involved in the commission of a crime, and, if you happened to initiate the confrontation yourself, you can show that you tried to escape before using force

Shooting someone is not a crime in of itself.But it will be treated as one unless you can show evidence of justification.

It is the intent that can be criminal.Intent is a big part of it, but it is not all.

I know the laws quite well thank you. Nowhere does it say that I must call 911 nor stick around to explain myself.Evidently you do not. Not every legal principle is spelled out in the statutes, and "nowhere does it say" is not a meaningful statement.

Kleanbore
September 1, 2013, 10:51 AM
Posted by Armor Snail: Guess you never saw this.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6wXk...e_gdata_player

Of course we have, but it is extremely poor advice for one who intends to present a defense of justification. That's why we have provided this (http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=589272).

JERRY
September 1, 2013, 11:09 AM
armor snail, you will have a harder time trying convince a jury that you were the victim and not the assailant...especially when the first story the police get is from the one shot (by word or evidence); good luck.

Armor Snail
September 1, 2013, 11:34 AM
First. This course of action would apply only in certain instances. My intent would not be to evade police. They would certainly be contacted but not before consulting my lawyer. Did you really think I would just go home like nothing happened. Most definitely a call to the authorities would be placed by myself at the proper time. Which is not always right away.

What if I am attacked in a isolated area and have no phone. Do you expect me to just sit down and wait?

Secondly, there is no duty to retreat in my state.

Third, Comm vs Thomas would not apply. He was a prior criminal who murdered someone and fled. Knowing he committed a crime.

Again defense is not a crime. What crime would one be eluding?

Fourth. Again. Never talk to the police without first talking to a lawyer. They are not your friend, everything said can be used against you. We all know this.

Sent from my Galaxy Nexus using Tapatalk 2

oneounceload
September 1, 2013, 12:00 PM
To the OP:

I carry a revolver because the round design of a revolver conceals better in my pocket and blends in better (since we humans are all rounded edges) than a blocky semi

Kleanbore
September 1, 2013, 01:31 PM
Posted by Armor Snail: First. This course of action would apply only in certain instances. My intent would not be to evade police. They would certainly be contacted but not before consulting my lawyer. Did you really think I would just go home like nothing happened. Most definitely a call to the authorities would be placed by myself at the proper time. Which is not always right away.Not sure what you are trying to say, but:

Having an attorney present during quesioning is strongly advised, and having one on the way to try to keep you out of jail would be beneficial, but other than that, consulting a lawyer before reporting the incident will do absolutely nothing to protect you.
"The proper time" is before anyone else reports the incident, and that does mean "right away."


What if I am attacked in a isolated area and have no phone. Do you expect me to just sit down and wait?Excellent question. No, you head directly to a police station, if you know where one is, or directly to a place from which you can place a call.

Secondly, there is no duty to retreat in my state.No, not once you have been attacked, which is something you are going to have to support with evidence. But I mentioned retreat after your having instigated the confrontation. Do not assume that others will not try to pin that upon you.

Third, Comm vs Thomas would not apply. He was a prior criminal who murdered someone and fled. Knowing he committed a crime.Of course it applies.

One's prior record is irrelevant in a criminal trial; and
The state's objective in any prosecution would be to show that you did in fact commit a crime.


Again defense is not a crime. What crime would one be eluding?The use of force against another person is a crime, unless all elements of justification are present. And it will be up to the person who has used force to present evidence supporting justification.

Fourth. Again. Never talk to the police without first talking to a lawyer. They are not your friend, everything said can be used against you. We all know this. You have apparently not taken the time to study the links we have provided. I strongly suggest that you do so.

Let's revisit your earlier statements:

I do also like that if I ever have a SD shoot casings stay with me. Not sure why. Your bullets will not stay with you.

If no one is around I see no legal reason to stay if I haven't committed a crime.first, If you leave, you will have given witnesses, arriving police officers, investigators, the charging authority, a grand jury if there is one, and a trial jury every reason to think that you are trying to evade capture and possible prosecution. But if you do have to leave, perhaps to get out of a very dangerous place, it is essential that you counter those reasons by being the first to report the incident.

Second, if you do have to leave, there is a not inconsequential risk that some of the evidence you will need for a successful defense of justifation will also disappear from the scene.

Looking at a 442 for a back up.Good idea.

Kleanbore
September 1, 2013, 02:54 PM
I first started carrying a Smith & Wesson 442--convenient,reliable, pocketable, simple.

I switched to a compact 9MM for two reasons- higher capacity, and a better trigger pull.

I like the idea of a revolver for backup.

Most police officers I know who carried backup revolvers back in the day preferred Colts, primarily for that "all important sixth shot."

I would like to try one out. I'm not enamored with the trigger pull of the J-Frame; that may be a very personal thing, since I have tendonitis and arthritis. If the Detective Special is noticeably better, I would be interested.

For those who insist upon carrying a revolver, I would recommend carrying two.

Crashbox
September 1, 2013, 10:23 PM
I often carry an SP101, 3.06" loaded with either Speer Gold Dot 125 JHP's or the classic Federal C357B 125-grain threat neutralizers.

I like revolvers for several reasons: they go BANG every time, simple point-and-click interface, 100% brass retention, and more fun at the range IMO.

Semi-OT but today I got the chance to shoot a pristine S&W Model 27, 5" barrel made in about '66 or '67. Talk about a real treat...

tubeshooter
September 1, 2013, 10:56 PM
I prefer to carry a revolver.


I like the general reliability factor (understanding that nothing is absolute)
It happens to be the platform of my caliber of choice



Those are basically my true reasons; pretty simple. The fact that I generally prefer them over autos aesthetically is just an aside.

skidder
September 2, 2013, 01:07 AM
I prefer revolvers for their simplicity: draw... pull trigger... bang... end of story.


Here is my rig. 1985 Speed Six.


http://i1212.photobucket.com/albums/cc456/exlogger/Speed%20Six/SpeedHolster_zps84f4ae11.jpg

http://i1212.photobucket.com/albums/cc456/exlogger/Speed%20Six/SpeedWin2_zps5bc9b6d9.jpg

tomrkba
September 2, 2013, 09:32 AM
I prefer revolvers for their simplicity: draw... pull trigger... bang... end of story.

I do not understand your point; perhaps you can expand upon it. I get the same interface with a SIG P-Series gun, Glock, HK, etc. The reloading procedure for a revolver is much more complicated.

Dirty Bob
September 2, 2013, 10:12 AM
As I mentioned before, one of the pluses for the revolver is less stuff to buy when purchasing. An autopistol is dependent on its magazines, so it's prudent to have several. Depending on the gun, this can be expensive, or -- in times of panic -- it can be difficult to find magazines for your pistol for any price.

Another advantage is customization. The recent generations of Rugers have had a "stick" grip tang, giving the owner almost limitless possibilities for custom grips to fit his or her hand. In my case, I find the SP101 factory stocks a bit small for me, although excellent for concealment. I prefer the hard nylon Hogue Monogrip (under $20), which can be swapped in less than a minute. I kept the factory grip so I can offer a shooter with a smaller hand something that fits better than the Hogue. Although autopistols can accept different grips or grip adapter, the options are not as broad as with a revolver like the Ruger DAs.

The SP101 is sometimes maligned as too big, too small, too heavy, too light, and the people saying this are probably all correct: concerning themselves. All handguns are a compromise, and I find the SP101 to be a very good compromise.

The barrel-heavy weight makes .38 loads a pleasure to shoot and less intimidating for new shooters. My wife is fine with a GP100 but finds the J-frames have too much recoil for her. I find that I can shoot .38+P much faster in an SP101 than in a J-frame, although I am too slow shooting a .357 to consider it seriously for defense with an SP101. Out of a Smith N-frame or a Ruger GP100, the .357 is much easier to manage for me.

I find the weight to not be a burden with a good belt and IWB holster, and the 5-round cylinder disappears under a t-shirt. Like I said, a compromise that works for me.

Respectfully,
Dirty Bob

I have nothing against semiautos, but I like revolvers more. It's part logic, and part emotion, but there it is.

ZVP
September 2, 2013, 12:13 PM
In short I carry a revolver because of it's dependability.
It's just the way it worked out , but I have always had a SA revolver. My first handgun was a SA and just recentlly, I decided to "get with the times" and bought a couple DA's
I have had my share of Semi=Autos and wore out a ,45 LLama but somehow I always waited for that critical "Jam" but the LLama NEVER gave it! Still I favored the old SA for many years. My selection of DA revolvers is a Model 10 Heavy Barrel and a Model 36 Chief Special .38 specials. Both proven preformers, combat accurate and very reliable.
Learning to shoot DAO is one of the hardest things I have ever tried and I am determined to learn how! Funny how much you move the barrel off target as you cycle the action! It takes a concentrated effort to shoot consistantly with minimal barrel movement!
At least I don't have to worry about my equipment malfunctioning with a revolver in good condition.
ZVP

Dave_in_Fairview_Park
September 2, 2013, 09:45 PM
Have 2 S&W model 64's 4inch. One is a DA round butt,bobbed hammer.

Other is dash5 , square butt,wide hammer and trigger.

Load plain old 158 gr any type lead!

Don't need a magnum,or + P loads.....

Shoot your right leg with a plain old .38 round

Then shoot the left leg with a + P round...witch hurts more?

Potato head.the ones still shooting revolvers ?

The ones who did not die when thier autos failed.

Frank44
September 3, 2013, 11:04 AM
Compromise is a word I've seen often in several posts. THE major compromise I've seen mentioned the most, in regards to revolvers, is capacity. I personally don't feel that it's a compromise. When I train I constantly repeat in my head, TAKE CARE OF EVERY SHOT. One hit center mass is hugely more effective that several hits outside center mass. Another aspect of the revolver, as mentioned by others, is that you can actually have a perfect grip that fits YOUR hand. This is not a small matter! A perfect grip is essential for the quickest and most accurate shot. The compromise, as to concealment, has been mentioned. If you can't conceal a S&W 442, you must be wearing skin tight pants! I routinely conceal a S&W 629 N frame, as mentioned, my preferred carry.

Dr_B
September 3, 2013, 05:07 PM
That Ruger Speed Six is awfully pretty.

stinger 327
September 3, 2013, 08:39 PM
Revolvers are probably the safest for most people to use less safeties to worry about and less chance of accidential discharge.

skidder
September 3, 2013, 10:18 PM
I do not understand your point; perhaps you can expand upon it. I get the same interface with a SIG P-Series gun, Glock, HK, etc. The reloading procedure for a revolver is much more complicated.

They are all the same. No misplaced levers, switches, or safeties. I can pick up any of my loaded DA revolvers and just pull the trigger. Some of the autos are ambidextrous some are not. Some have a grip safety some do not. Some have a de-cock some do not. Striker fire or hammer fire? Is my first pull DA or SA?

I prefer my finger is the stored energy behind the firing pin.

The reloading speed goes to the autos, but so do the number of FTFs.

That being said my biggest reason for choosing a revolver is reloading. I don't like to lose my brass. I'm a cheapskate because I love to shoot.

They are not picky. My plinking loads are 1/2 the powder and they always cycle.

Fiv3r
September 3, 2013, 11:11 PM
I'm not going to argue with a lot of the stats and info. I carry an auto when I'm out and about 90% of the time. However, when I go camping or sometimes just beacuse, I pack a .357 Vaquero in a holster kit I built for it. Yes, its heavy. Yes, it's low capacity and not "fast" like a DA. But damn if I don't like it. It just points. Where ever I will it, that's where the bullet is going. I could get along just fine with a SA .357 on my hip even if I "know better".

tomrkba
September 7, 2013, 11:06 PM
skidder...I get it. For me, it's about fun. They're just really fun to shoot and reload for.

Meeteetse
September 8, 2013, 04:13 PM
I do not apologize for carrying and liking revolvers. The argument for or against revolvers vs. semi-autos usually comes down to capacity. I practice with my revolvers. I hit what I aim at. Capacity is not an issue. If the Zombie hordes materialize perhaps I will change my mind, or better yet, just carry a second revolver.

doc2rn
September 8, 2013, 07:33 PM
I prefer to carry a S&W mod 10 3" bull barrel, sq butt with a hogue grip, in a Galco Highrise.

Esoxchaser
September 8, 2013, 07:56 PM
Used to prefer wheelies for reliability. 30 years later I prefer autoloaders for the lessened recoil, higher capacity and slimmer profile. Still prefer to hunt with wheel guns. Just because.

Gun Master
September 8, 2013, 07:58 PM
I prefer revolver (not exclusively), because my S&W Airweight Bodyguard is powerful enough, has 5 rds., reliable, & is light enough to carry, and not a tendency to be left home in a drawer. What good is your 1911 (which I more than admire), if you think it's too heavy to carry, & leave it ? I like my autos & wheelguns, but "prefer" revolver for CWC. ><> Hope I don't have to use it !

stinger 327
September 9, 2013, 12:11 AM
If you have a LCR +P .38 vs. one of those pocket 9mm pistols isn't the LCR still more powerful than the pocket 9mm like a Ruger LC9? or Sig 938?:confused:

smkummer
September 9, 2013, 07:52 AM
I still carry some small Colt 38 special snubbies such as agents and cobras for light weight and can shoot them better than pocket 9s or .380, These were acquired when one could buy these in the $2-300 range used. Any future purchases would favor the "flat" semi autos for easier hideout carry. And the fact that I realize that 3, 7 and 10 yard ranges is far more common than hitting a man size target at 25-50 yards.

burnse
September 9, 2013, 04:46 PM
I prefer revolvers. I carry a revolver every day. It's a .44 spl, and it works just fine. I own only one semi auto, a little Cz 70, and it is a lot of fun (my wife shoots it more and better than I do, but also prefers the bulldog). Beyond that, and for the foreseeable future, I am going to stick with revolvers. They feel more natural (lending to increased ease of use), and I fire more accurately with them. I also enjoy their simplicity and versatility (EDIT: "versatile" in respect to ammunition). I also consider revolvers, overall, to be more aesthetically appealing than anything with a slide.

I saw ages being mentioned, and I thought I'd throw in, too - I am 26 years old.

stinger 327
September 9, 2013, 05:39 PM
I prefer revolvers. I carry a revolver every day. It's a .44 spl, and it works just fine. I own only one semi auto, a little Cz 70, and it is a lot of fun (my wife shoots it more and better than I do, but also prefers the bulldog). Beyond that, and for the foreseeable future, I am going to stick with revolvers. They feel more natural (lending to increased ease of use), and I fire more accurately with them. I also enjoy their simplicity and versatility (EDIT: "versatile" in respect to ammunition). I also consider revolvers, overall, to be more aesthetically appealing than anything with a slide.

I saw ages being mentioned, and I thought I'd throw in, too - I am 26 years old.
majority of people in your age group prefer autos.

sixgunner455
September 9, 2013, 05:43 PM
Prefer a small revolver to a small semiauto for daily carry. Prefer a Kframe magnum for woods/mountain carry to a full size semiauto, except when I'm closer to Mexico than Tucson. Prefer the big semiauto for going to Tucson or Phoenix. :D

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