Favorite use of deer meat?


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hipoint
August 24, 2013, 12:12 AM
Just putting some feelers out there for folks favorite use of deer. I have depredation permits on my farm and we eat ALOT of deer here. To be honest we're getting burnt out on it, but it's practically free and we have to take them out anyways...

My personal favorite is battered and fried, but I'm really anxious to get some more uses!

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Texan Scott
August 24, 2013, 12:20 AM
Jerky. OMG VENISON JERKY!

Andrew Leigh
August 24, 2013, 12:26 AM
Definitely in a pie, it is well suited to this. Picked up an awesome recipe I tried last month. Can forward it if you want.

Over this side of the pond we also like to cook it long and slow in a Dutch Oven.

However venisons most popular use here is to turn it all into Jerky, we do jerky slightly differently. From the basic salt and white pepper and brown vinegar marinade to more complex arrangements that include roasted corriander seeds. Never met and American visitor that did not like our style of jerky. All the offcuts and little bitties are then minced, along with brisket for the fat content and mixed with spices to make two types of sausage. Both unique to S.A. The one is cooked fresh and the other is dried much like a salami and is also excellent as a high protein snack with a beer.

I have eaten jerky made from the following animals (have not shot them all). Elephant, Buffalo, Kudu, Eland, Impala, Springbuck, Ostrich, Warthog, Giraffe, can't think of others at the moment. Elephant and Buffalo jerky is excellent by the way and ranks as my favourites, very difficult to get hold of though.

hipoint
August 24, 2013, 12:36 AM
hahaha, no jerky here. I can't be trusted. I WILL eat jerky and only jerky until it is all gone and then my teeth hurt for a week.


Hmmm, never thought of a dry sausage with it, something like a "summer sausage" I would imagine...

thanks for the recommendations so far! I probably shoot 1-2 deer a month, could take more but I just get so tired of cleaning them. Anyhow, that seems to keep them beaten down enough to not cause us huge issues. My point is, yeah, we have alot of deer meat. I obviously give quite a bit of it away, but we are very excited to hear some new recipes.

I checked the recipe sticky, copied and pasted a few to my desktop recipe book.

Thanks!

andrew leigh, I'd love to get a copy of the pie recipe if you don't mind sending it! That would be really neat using a foreign recipe for our local deer!

horsemen61
August 24, 2013, 12:52 AM
i love it fried :D:D:D:D:D:D

ColtPythonElite
August 24, 2013, 01:09 AM
Ground and ran thru a jerky shooter.

dacavasi
August 24, 2013, 01:59 AM
Man, not sure what you guys are shootin' but here in TX there ain't no substitute for marinated and grilled, backstrap or hindquarters, either one. I would agree though that a slow cooker recipe (100's out there on the web) will also do the trick with little prep work...

tarosean
August 24, 2013, 02:56 AM
Man, not sure what you guys are shootin' but here in TX there ain't no substitute for marinated and grilled, backstrap or hindquarters, either one.

Venison Chili my friend.

Lloyd Smale
August 24, 2013, 05:58 AM
venison subs. I take a frozen chunk of meat and slice it real thin with a razon knife and fry it in butter with onions, mushrooms and peppers, and crushed garlic and put it on a loaf of french bread with american and cheddar chesse melted on it. I cant picture a better tasting meal. Im also a big fan of cube steaks. I have a cuber for my grinder. take a cube steak drench it in flour cook in butter and also make a batch of fried potatoes with lots of onion and put it all on a plate and laddle sausage gravy over the hole mess. Its a meal fit for a king. then again backstraps on the grill are hard to beat too.

ole farmerbuck
August 24, 2013, 06:32 AM
It's early Lloyd but that post makes me hungry!:)

buck460XVR
August 24, 2013, 08:20 AM
Jerky can make a big piece of meat small very quick and folks seem to never refuse it. My favorite lately is a 50/50 venison/pork seasoned "breakfast sausage". Works well just the way it is, but also makes great Sausage gravy and meatballs and gravy. Cheap Pork steaks/roasts make for the best mix for the lean venison. Took me a while to find my preference to the level of seasonings, but I now make it in twenty pound batches.

Odd Job
August 24, 2013, 08:32 AM
Like Andrew Leigh says, biltong is simply irresistible. Jerky is not biltong, properly made biltong is far superior!
I haven't had buffalo, elephant or giraffe but the rest I can vouch for. Also kalahari chicken biltong with lemon and black pepper.
I am drooling here just thinking about it! Droe wors and cabanossi, also very good.

Edit: here's a nice piece of beef biltong a mate brought me from SA a few years back. That's a nice size!

http://i55.photobucket.com/albums/g154/Odd_Job/Biltong.jpg (http://s55.photobucket.com/user/Odd_Job/media/Biltong.jpg.html)

MCgunner
August 24, 2013, 08:40 AM
It's Texas...chili, of course. I also like 50/50 sausage.

3212
August 24, 2013, 09:03 AM
We do a venison stew in the crockpot,pure venison burgers,steaks on the grill and bologna.

Carmmond
August 24, 2013, 11:00 AM
We get most of ours processed into Ring baloney, Brats, Cheese Hotdogs, Sausage and Bacon all of it’s to die for. Oh and I also make our own Jerky on the smoker.

http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e7/Carmmond/P1010582.jpg

SleazyRider
August 24, 2013, 11:35 AM
We do a venison stew in the crockpot,pure venison burgers,steaks on the grill and bologna.
I'm with you on that! Give me a big pot of venison stew that I can draw from all week, simply microwaving smaller portions on the re-heat and serving it up with a slice of bread. Contains all your veggies and protein in one easy, quick meal; and portable enough to put in your Thermos. Add some tabasco and you're good to go!

burrhead
August 24, 2013, 12:12 PM
I have a marinated backstrap thawing in the fridge right now. This evening it'll get wrapped in bacon and put on the grill. I use a meat thermometer and cook to 145-150, slice in ¼ inch rounds and drag them through horse radish. Yum!

The tenders get the same treatment as above, sometimes the straps become chicken fried, the hams turned into roasts. Everything else ground into breakfast sausage (with pork), smoked sausage, dry sausage, and chili meat.

BigBore44
August 24, 2013, 12:19 PM
+1k on the stew. I never get tired of leftover stew and it gets better everyday.

Sleazy, instead of Tobasco on the side or in the stew, I use one quart of regular V8, and 1 quart of Spicy V8 as my liquid for the stew. Really gives it an awesome kick and adds more nutrition also. Try it some time. Let me know what you think.

Art Eatman
August 24, 2013, 12:22 PM
I like to barbecue a ham. Whatever's leftover after a party goes into stew.

Google for "romertopf". You can make tough meat quite tender with one of those in making a stew.

Patocazador
August 24, 2013, 01:41 PM
I was in So. Africa in the '80s but never had biltong but country fried warthog steaks were out of this world.
I love deer jerky (who doesn't) but we eat deer mostly by just cutting it into steaks and cooking on the grill or under the broiler .. just like beef. Only garlic and some pepper and done med-rare. Makes me drool right now.

Texan Scott
August 24, 2013, 02:32 PM
Chili, of course, but I can't in good conscience put the man up to feeding his family chili 8 times a week. :evil:

My wife makes meatloaf with it, draped in bacon....

Don't y'all have Hunters for the Hungry where y'all are? Price of beef being what it is, 5 or 6 deer run through the grinder and packed in 2-lb tubes will add good lean meat to a LOT of poor families' tables.

snakeman
August 24, 2013, 02:35 PM
Steaks either mesquite grilled or stuffed with jalapeno sliver and cream cheese broiled. Or JERKY!

MCgunner
August 24, 2013, 02:38 PM
Yeah, I hunt for the hungry, me and the wife. :D

Double_J
August 24, 2013, 03:29 PM
Put the hind quarter in the oven with a couple of cans of consume' for liquid. Stuff the meat with onion, garlic, olives, jalapeno's, and more garlic, cover in lemon pepper and cook till done at 250 degrees. Serve with french bread. Backstrap is cut into small medallions and dredged through flour and pan-fried. The rest can be cooked in the oven, made into chilli, or smoked as needed.

Captcurt
August 24, 2013, 03:44 PM
I cook neck roast in crockpot with onion soup mix. Great on a bun with or without Sweet Baby Ray's. Run a few batches of summer sausage, and jerky. But fried with biscuits and flour gravy gets the biggest nods. My daughter was gone for 2 1/2 years. We flew her home for Christmas and first thing that she wanted to do was shoot a gun. The first thing that she wanted to eat was venison.

That's my girl.:D

Officers'Wife
August 24, 2013, 03:58 PM
Hmmm, that would be the tenderloin, marinated overnight in a mix of Bacadi 151, lager beer, honey, blackstrap molasses and mix of herbs and spices... then wrapped in side meat and broiled. The hams injected with a mix of ingredients (mainly raw molasses) and put in the smokehouse. The rest is made into jerky that I use for cooking. The bones are boiled over a wood fire in my great grandmother's rendering kettle into broth for soup stock. I'm told my Dad and uncle used to use the intestines for sausage casings but so far he hasn't shared that technique with me. My sister in law tans the hides and works the leather.

My grandfather's favorite was the heart baked in bread crumb dressing. Even though the old gentleman has passed away I make the dish on his birthday and invite my grandmother for dinner.

rondog
August 24, 2013, 04:03 PM
I have to admit, I've never had the chance to take a deer, but I really want to. And you guys are killing me with all these tales! Hipoint, do you need any help with population control?

LeonCarr
August 24, 2013, 04:21 PM
In order of most desirable:

1. Backstrap marinated overnight in apple cider, wrapped in bacon and dusted with Montreal Steak Seasoning, grilled to medium rare. Everything Uncle Ted says about backstrap on his TV show is absolutely true.
2. Chicken Fried Venison Round Steak, with the round steak tenderized and pounded flat about 1/8 inch thick (I usually use a recently emptied Shiner Bock Beer Bottle for this) with skin on Yukon Gold mashed potatoes and skillet fried green beans.
3. Chili, the recipe I use has ground venison and ground pork and I usually use ground feral hog pork. Out of this world good, everybody who tries it eats it all, even the ones who say they won't eat Bambi :).
4. Cheeseburger Macaroni Hamburger Helper made with ground venison. I lived on this and Spaghetti with Venison Meat Sauce in college.
5. A plain 'ol Venison Hamburger. Mixed up with some Bacon and Bleu Cheese and grilled to about medium well. Yum.

Officer's Wife - Bacardi 151 is good stuff, like Everclear but actually has flavor.

Just my .02,
LeonCarr

Officers'Wife
August 24, 2013, 04:31 PM
I have to admit, I've never had the chance to take a deer, but I really want to. And you guys are killing me with all these tales! Hipoint, do you need any help with population control?
Hi RonDog

To be fair, I come from a household where the attitude of living off the bounty of the farm is very close to being an 11th commandment. I have hand written recipes for game animals that date back to the 1800's.

Tell you what though, way down south in White County (Indiana) there are whitetails prancing all over the place. I'm sure you could find someone that would let you harvest one or two.

grubbylabs
August 24, 2013, 04:35 PM
We do roast, steaks, burger, sausage and jerkey.

Roast is in a dutch with onion soup mix and beef broth and assorted veggies, Steak is Lea & Perins (spelling) with garlic salt and Lemon Pepper, done on the grill with Kingsford, not V1 or whoever else supplies your propane.

Burger is mixed with beef fat or pork roast.

Sausage is always done 1-2 ratio 1lb wild meat with two of pork (any pork is good, just don't use a ham, it to salty). It is still pretty lean. We make breakfast sausage Italian sausage, and all kinds of linked sausages.

Jerkey is with a mix and sliced by hand real thin and done on a dryer.

If you don't have a dutch oven, go get an oven dutch (no legs) and a dutch oven cook book and start trying new things. A dutch oven (to me any way) is a cast iron pot with or without legs that can be used in a regular oven or on coals or open flame. A dutch oven is not an enamel pot with a lid like you see on food net work.

Carmmond
August 24, 2013, 05:36 PM
My grandfather's favorite was the heart baked in bread crumb dressing. Even though the old gentleman has passed away I make the dish on his birthday and invite my grandmother for dinner.

I just did my first beef hart for the dog on the smoker and ended up eating more than her.... I would like to hear more about your recipe.

rondog
August 24, 2013, 05:44 PM
Sounds like a recipe thread is needed!

Officers'Wife
August 24, 2013, 07:42 PM
Just your basic bread dressing and baked much the same as with fowl or poultry. Just use a beef or venison heart instead of a chicken.

Leon: the 151 also has a range of congenders that help tenderize the meat, it's the beer that adds the unique flavoring.

oneounceload
August 24, 2013, 07:45 PM
Chili, hamburger, stew, jerky, steaks
When I had more chances for deer, I used a crock pot a LOT for slow cooking

hipoint
August 24, 2013, 08:33 PM
awesome guys, I have gotten a couple new ideas here! alot of the stuff is what we already do with it, some have new twists. I hope you guys don't mind, but I'm copy/pasting the ones I really like and keeping them!

I got a really OLD recipe for turtle soup today from a lady who said her grandmother came up with it a hundred years ago. Give me a few to get it typed up and I'll share it here.


as per some of the questions, there is a STICKY regarding wild meat recipes, but it seems to have been abandoned/ignored hence myself posting this. I'd LOVE to hear recipes not only involving venison, but bear, boar, squirrel, rabbit... heck, anything you can cook! We do NOT have a hunters for the hungry around here, mainly because we do not have a licensed deer processing facility in our area. Funny thing, everyone who does come here to hunt ends up saying the same thing "you have more deer than anyone in the county here and you're the only one who doesn't want them around" haha. Our whitetail are generally pretty small here, never weighed one, but when my gal moved here from eastern north carolina, she joked about our deer looking like dogs :p

We most certainly eat everything we shoot here on the farm, and don't get me wrong, I AM thankful for all the bounty, but it does get old after a bit. Been trying to trade some off for beef, etc... but not had much luck. After over 2 years of deer being pretty much the only red meat we consume, I'm really looking for some new ways to cook the stuff!!! I usually don't shoot them during the hot months just because they're so hard to process and keep flies away, but it's about time to start up again...


OH, btw... here's something you fellas might not have heard of/done with it yet. I can quite a bit of ours in mason jars! works like a dang champ and WAY better than freezing, it'll keep longer and it's easier to prepare when you're ready to eat. I'll take some of the bones, boil them in a big stock pot to make a broth with LIGHT spices to taste (usually with a couple cubes of beef bullion too). You don't want to overspice it because that will make it harder to do different things with it later on... anyhow, after the broth is done, I'll lightly brown chunked meat, I don't cook it, just sear it enought to brown the outside over a high heat. Then I put the meat in the jars, add enough broth to cover it up (leaving enough headspace in the jar) and then pressure can it for the appropriate amount of time. When you go to use it in a stew, make a vegetable stew FIRST (using the broth from the jar). Then when the stew is actually done, dump the meat in. You do this because after canning it is VERY tender and will actually disappear in the stew if you try to put the meat in at the first. Works great, no worries about power outages, super easy to use, no thawing, and a good SHTF skill to have. You can use it in stroghanoff and plenty of other dishes where "stewed" meat would be called for. I find PINT jars are the perfect amount of meat for a decent pot of stew that would easily feed 4 folks for a meal.

hipoint
August 24, 2013, 08:49 PM
I have to admit, I've never had the chance to take a deer, but I really want to. And you guys are killing me with all these tales! Hipoint, do you need any help with population control?
rondog, I didn't notice where you are from. we live in western north carolina. I've tried letting folks come here to hunt before, but our place is pretty small, only about 30 acres, and I find myself having to postpone farmwork because I don't want to mess up hunting for the folks who come and make an effort. My best advice is start contacting farms and ask them if they have any wild game issues that they would allow you to come hunt. Assure them that you are sober, safe with firearms and will respect their land. Depending on the area, they may just jump on the offer. Around here we have LOTS of forest, so there are lots of public hunting lands. In an area where there are few public hunting lands, I would expect farmers get LOTS of calls like that so it might be best to try and focus on farms that are in areas that have public hunting available also. I'm sure some farmer near you is having terrible issues with deer or hogs and would LOVE some help! Here in N.C. the permits I get allow spotlighting as well as just about anything else, I would assume the same would go for other state farmer permits, some places might not need permits, whereas others may not issue them at all and you would have to abide by regular hunting seasons...

I really do wish I could just invite you on over, but it ends up that either I have to postpone farm work for the hunting, or I run the tractors and other machinery and while it doesn't quite "ruin" the chances, it does cut it back a bit. I have found that deer seem to really like some types of machinery, I ALWAYS carry a gun on the tractor now and usually carry one while chainsawing/weedeating, the 2 stroke engines really draw them in it seems. Whereas the regular lawnmowers send them scurrying off.

Officers'Wife
August 24, 2013, 08:59 PM
Hi HiPoint,

Try making a highly spiced jerky then using the jerky for your stews and chili. It might be a change of pace for your diet. My only problem with canning meat is the very real possibility of spoilage. I use metal cans so spoilage is pretty obvious but there is still the waste. :(

oneounceload
August 24, 2013, 09:11 PM
Friend has a recipe where you take the backstrap and you wrap in pork sausage and then it is COMPLETELY wrapped in a weave of bacon and then cooked in the oven. Pork and bacon makes the venison taste good!

hipoint
August 24, 2013, 09:15 PM
I don't see how pressure canned meat can spoil? at least not in any reasonable amount of time. I guess it couldn't seal properly though. It is a good idea to keep it out of the light, as UV really degrades everything.


I LOVE jerky, way too much, I can't make it anymore because I can't be trusted with it haha. If it ever makes it long enough, you can "can" jerky as well in a pressure canner, it'll last a really long time like that.

hipoint
August 24, 2013, 09:16 PM
Friend has a recipe where you take the backstrap and you wrap in pork sausage and then it is COMPLETELY wrapped in a weave of bacon and then cooked in the oven. Pork and bacon makes the venison taste good!
we make a thing similar to that called a "fat boy" or a "fattie"... stuffed tenderloin, wrapped in sausage, wrapped in bacon... It is really good, but I'm afraid to eat it very often, lest the name become a reality hahaha

rondog
August 24, 2013, 09:44 PM
Hipoint - no problem, I was kinda kidding anyway, I'm in Colorado, near Denver. I actually know a few folks out east of my town, the deer out there are thick as flies and a real traffic/safety hazard. It's all rural, and although there's lots of houses and people the lots are all 5+ acres. I've been told it's legal to shoot deer as long as the projectiles don't leave your property and you use some sense about what kind of gun. Such as a .44mag carbine or shotgun w/slugs instead of a .30-06, etc. One guy I met shoots them off his back deck while drinking coffee. This spring he counted 44 whitetails in his backyard one day!

tahunua001
August 24, 2013, 09:48 PM
my favorite use for deer meat? usually I like to eat it... that's the best use in my opinion.

it makes crappy cologne and deer meat rope leaves something to be desired.

hipoint
August 24, 2013, 09:50 PM
Hipoint - no problem, I was kinda kidding anyway, I'm in Colorado, near Denver. I actually know a few folks out east of my town, the deer out there are thick as flies and a real traffic/safety hazard. It's all rural, and although there's lots of houses and people the lots are all 5+ acres. I've been told it's legal to shoot deer as long as the projectiles don't leave your property and you use some sense about what kind of gun. Such as a .44mag carbine or shotgun w/slugs instead of a .30-06, etc. One guy I met shoots them off his back deck while drinking coffee. This spring he counted 44 whitetails in his backyard one day!
now that is a ridiculous amount of deer! I'd lay the smackdown on them too, it's gotta be bad to have that many around.

Last time the game wardens were here to update my permit, they said that they had been petitioning the state to extend the western n.c. rifle season, as it stands we only have about 2 weeks to hunt deer and until this year, no hunting on sundays either. That meant a working man would get 2 maybe 3 days to hunt and that's it. Not to mention their data was from the 1970's regarding our deer population!

303tom
August 25, 2013, 12:00 AM
Mostly sausages & bologna`s.......................

hipoint
August 25, 2013, 12:07 AM
my favorite use for deer meat? usually I like to eat it... that's the best use in my opinion.

it makes crappy cologne and deer meat rope leaves something to be desired.
hahahahaa... yeah, that'll teach me to leave an open ended question like that :)

hipoint
August 25, 2013, 12:09 AM
Hi HiPoint,

Try making a highly spiced jerky then using the jerky for your stews and chili. It might be a change of pace for your diet. My only problem with canning meat is the very real possibility of spoilage. I use metal cans so spoilage is pretty obvious but there is still the waste. :(
Can you go a bit further into detail? I haven't had any spoil, but maybe I've just been lucky. I usually go past the recommendation for my altitude just to be on the safe side with everything I pressure can, botulism scares the heck outta me!

Byrd666
August 25, 2013, 12:22 AM
Stew, chili, sausage, meat pie was mentioned, (personal favorite). Burgers. Added to, or instead of, ham or beef in the eggs or pizza, or whatever.

Andrew Leigh
August 25, 2013, 03:02 AM
Curiously none have mentioned milk as a marinade.

The old boers taught us to marinade in milk or buttermilk overnight, the milk seems to draw out the excess blood (which in some African antelope can be overly strong tasting) from the meat and tenderises WITHOUT adding any artificial taste.

The boers also used to marinade in vinegar overnight, this is not for me, although not offensive it does leave a slight taste.

I prefer the taste of the meat and although sauces are nice the big advantage of venison happens to be how healthy a protein source it is. To cover venison with all manners of sugar, fat and starch based additives seems self defeating, if not rather tasty however. So I am more sparing with these products but often roasts and sausage can do with some "moiturising fat".

I am off on a hunt this coming Thursday, we aim on shooting a herd of Impala, well actually 6 and hopefully one Blue Wildebeest cow as they represent the best value for money venison one can shoot. I will bring the meat back in strips and the offcuts as a sausage. Any of you care to share a basic jerky recipe with me that I can try, get the flavours of the real US and not Oberto's. The recipe would have to be with raw ingredients as we will not get most the packaged mixed spice packs that are marketed your side of the pond.

Taste is an odd thing, what you grow up with is what you stay with. Other tastes are not bad but simply different. Was in your neck of the woods a couple of years ago and drove around Frisco, Yosemite, Highway 1 etc. before heading of to the Grand Canyon and Sedona.

There were a couple of things I had to try, these were Jerky (cowboy movies), a bowl of Chilli (cop movies) and Biscuits and Gravy (redneck based movies, not meant in an insulting manner).

Tried a couple of styles of jerky and all seemed sweet (sugar / molasses sweet) to me? Did I get the wrong stuff or is this the prefered manner of preparation.

Would also not mind a decent Chilli recipe, I had chilli in the Grand Canyon which was served in a sourdough bowl (a taste I could not get into, not offensive but would not rush to order again) and the chilli had very little Chillie, I suppose that was due to the fact that they cater for a wideranging bunch of holiday makers.

The last one was biscuits and gravy which a tired in Yosemite. Do biscuits have sourmilk in them?

Cheers

JohnhenrySTL
August 25, 2013, 04:17 AM
Chili when I am shy on cash. Great thread by the way.

Officers'Wife
August 25, 2013, 07:17 AM
I don't see how pressure canned meat can spoil? at least not in any reasonable amount of time. I guess it couldn't seal properly though. It is a good idea to keep it out of the light, as UV really degrades everything.


I LOVE jerky, way too much, I can't make it anymore because I can't be trusted with it haha. If it ever makes it long enough, you can "can" jerky as well in a pressure canner, it'll last a really long time like that.
Many ways, botulism is a tenacious bug. With glass jars the culprit is usually a bad seal

I have the same problem with my hubby and brother when it comes to the jerky. I sometimes think it would be more effective to keep my jewelry in the cupboard and the jerky in a safe.

I learned to cook with jerky when my Dad dragged me (kicking and screaming) to the Rosebud Indian Reservation. In some ways I prefer it's flavor & texture to fresh meat. Luckily I usually get my limit bowhunting, hubby during gun season and my late uncle built us a rather large and efficient smokehouse so there is a pretty good supply. I just wish we knew a truck driver that made runs to the southwest that could bring me a supply of fresh mesquite wood. I've always wanted to try smoking with that species.

Officers'Wife
August 25, 2013, 07:20 AM
Marinate in milk? Interesting! I'll have to try that. Thank you!

hipoint
August 25, 2013, 11:47 AM
Curiously none have mentioned milk as a marinade.

The old boers taught us to marinade in milk or buttermilk overnight, the milk seems to draw out the excess blood (which in some African antelope can be overly strong tasting) from the meat and tenderises WITHOUT adding any artificial taste.

The boers also used to marinade in vinegar overnight, this is not for me, although not offensive it does leave a slight taste.

I prefer the taste of the meat and although sauces are nice the big advantage of venison happens to be how healthy a protein source it is. To cover venison with all manners of sugar, fat and starch based additives seems self defeating, if not rather tasty however. So I am more sparing with these products but often roasts and sausage can do with some "moiturising fat".

I am off on a hunt this coming Thursday, we aim on shooting a herd of Impala, well actually 6 and hopefully one Blue Wildebeest cow as they represent the best value for money venison one can shoot. I will bring the meat back in strips and the offcuts as a sausage. Any of you care to share a basic jerky recipe with me that I can try, get the flavours of the real US and not Oberto's. The recipe would have to be with raw ingredients as we will not get most the packaged mixed spice packs that are marketed your side of the pond.

Taste is an odd thing, what you grow up with is what you stay with. Other tastes are not bad but simply different. Was in your neck of the woods a couple of years ago and drove around Frisco, Yosemite, Highway 1 etc. before heading of to the Grand Canyon and Sedona.

There were a couple of things I had to try, these were Jerky (cowboy movies), a bowl of Chilli (cop movies) and Biscuits and Gravy (redneck based movies, not meant in an insulting manner).

Tried a couple of styles of jerky and all seemed sweet (sugar / molasses sweet) to me? Did I get the wrong stuff or is this the prefered manner of preparation.

Would also not mind a decent Chilli recipe, I had chilli in the Grand Canyon which was served in a sourdough bowl (a taste I could not get into, not offensive but would not rush to order again) and the chilli had very little Chillie, I suppose that was due to the fact that they cater for a wideranging bunch of holiday makers.

The last one was biscuits and gravy which a tired in Yosemite. Do biscuits have sourmilk in them?

Cheers
andrew, what I do for jerky is a marinade of black pepper, soy sauce or teriyaki sauce (sometimes both), some garlic powder (or just crush some cloves in the marinade) and whatever spices float your boat... Teriyaki will give it a sweetish flavor although barely detectable, I personally can't stand sweet meats. Mainly, it's pepper, salt, and garlic and/or onion for me. Sometimes I like to heavily season it, sometimes I like to let more of the meat flavor come through. I cut it really thin, seems like the thicker pieces, while not "spoiled" get a slight "soured" flavor/smell to them, not desireable but not worth throwing it out over. My marinade has to taste good by itself before I'll put meat in it, if it's overpoweringly salty, the meat will be too salty.

yes, most biscuits have buttermilk in them, but not all. Really depends on who made them. Good biscuits and gravy is to die for, sadly most folks skimp on their gravy and it isn't what it should be...

Smoked jerky sounds awesome, guess I need to get around to building that smokehouse!!!

also, would love for someone to share a dry sausage recipe (something like a summer sausage?)

Carmmond
August 25, 2013, 11:50 AM
Curiously none have mentioned milk as a marinade.


In Wisconsin if you hunt in the North woods I would do this to take away the "gamey smell" but if you hunt farmland like I do I have never had a reason to do this..... it's all about what the deer eat;)

andrew, what I do for jerky is a marinade of black pepper, soy sauce or teriyaki sauce (sometimes both), some garlic powder (or just crush some cloves in the marinade) and whatever spices float your boat...

I used to do the same but now use Jerky Fixin's I can get it at Gander Mountain for $1.99 for 3bls of meat and it tastes great and it's made right here in my home State.

http://wildlifeseasoning.com/Wildlife_Seasonings/Jerky.html

There original, pepper and Cajun are my favorites.

Andrew Leigh
August 25, 2013, 12:33 PM
A traditional local jerky recipe would be;

Grape vinegar
Rock salt
White pepper
Roasted and cracked corriander seeds

We would have vinegar on the meat and then sprinkle each layer of meat with the rock salt, whire pepper and cracked corriander. This would be left overnight and hung the following day. With the modern day jerky driers I would doubt if the vinegar is necessary but it does act as a solution to dissolve the other spices.

An alternate to vinegar would be Worcester Sauce, but marinade for much less time, a couple of hours. I suppose much like soy or teriyaki.

I like the soy idea, will give that a bash this time around.

So the traditional jerky recipes are not dissimilar from ours. By the way I am told that we are the only ones that use the toasted cracked corriander seeds in both our jerky and sausage, try it on a piece or two next time out.

Captcurt
August 25, 2013, 01:30 PM
I forgot TACOS.

Hondo 60
August 25, 2013, 02:47 PM
My favorites?

1. Summer Sausage (sorta like hard salami)
2. Venison sticks - same thing only smaller around
3. Jerky - used to be my fav, but it's hard to eat with no upper teeth (even can pull the dentures out.)

rondog
August 25, 2013, 03:13 PM
Andrew Leigh - American chili is a very subjective thing. Nearly EVERYONE has a different idea about what chili should be, there's probably tens of thousands of recipes. Some like it hot, some not, some prefer it insanely hot. With beans, without, many kinds of beans. Many kinds of meat, some even meatless.

"Chili" is more of a food classification, like "soup", rather than one specific dish and recipe. Contests called chili cookoffs are common, with countless different recipes represented.

I've had chili in New York that was more like spaghetti sauce with beans in it! That was just disturbing.

red rick
August 25, 2013, 03:17 PM
Stew is my favorite, especially on a cold winters day.

I like it fried too, with mashed potatoes, green beans and gravy.

hipoint
August 25, 2013, 03:19 PM
Andrew Leigh - American chili is a very subjective thing. Nearly EVERYONE has a different idea about what chili should be, there's probably tens of thousands of recipes. Some like it hot, some not, some prefer it insanely hot. With beans, without, many kinds of beans. Many kinds of meat, some even meatless.

"Chili" is more of a food classification, like "soup", rather than one specific dish and recipe. Contests called chili cookoffs are common, with countless different recipes represented.

I've had chili in New York that was more like spaghetti sauce with beans in it! That was just disturbing.
haha, one of my buddies from california makes what he calls "real chili" and we argue over it to no end, but yeah, it's a little like spaghetti sauce too. He calls mine "soup" and I call his "ketchup" haha It's not bad, just the texture is not what I'm used to.

okiewita40
August 26, 2013, 03:32 AM
My favorite way of eating bambi is 1 pound of ground venison and 1 pound ground pork sausage. Mix them together in a big bowl. Make into hamburger patties and grill them. Then cover them with pepperjack cheese and BBQ sauce.

Makes for the best burgers I have ever eaten.

Lloyd Smale
August 26, 2013, 06:28 AM
little trick for you guys that maranade. I shoot alot of deer and really like back straps on the grill. What i do with mine is clean them up real good and vaccum pack them. When i do ill sprinkle them with montery steak seasoning and a little ranch or french dressing and vaccum pack them allready with the maranade. I think the vaccum packing helps get the flavor deaper into the meat and it makes it easy as all you have to do is take them out the day before you want to eat them and there ready to go. You can do this with any maranade recipe you have.

Arkansas Paul
August 26, 2013, 12:28 PM
I'm different than a lot of folks around here. I actually like the gamey taste of venison, so I don't do marinades. The only exception is when I grill whole backstraps. Then I like to marinade but it's thick enough that you still get the taste of the meat.
A guy told us once that he knew how to marinate deer to where it tasted just like beef. To which my dad replied, "If I wanted beef, I wouldn't get out of bed at 4:30 in the morning and freeze my butt off in a deer stand. I'd buy beef."

My favorite thing to do is pan fry it with a little salt and garlic powder and a whole lot of black pepper.
I also like chili and stews. I tried making fajitas with thinly sliced deer steak once and didn't care for it.

The #1 thing to keep in mind with venison IMO is to not overcook it. To me, nothing is better than well cooked venison. And nothing is worse than overcooked venison. And it doesn't take long to overcook it.

yzguy87
August 26, 2013, 03:05 PM
Deer sticks, jerky and roast in the crock pot with mushroom gravy.

mnhntr
August 26, 2013, 04:04 PM
Take your pic man. You can do anything with it. My favorite is texas backstrap which is backstrap stuffed with pablano pepper, onion, and pepperjack cheese and wrapped in bacon and grilled. However, we use way more ground because you can do so much with it. You can make meatloaf, spagetti, burgers, chilli, dirty rice, on and on and on.

Arkansas Paul
August 26, 2013, 04:36 PM
My favorite is texas backstrap which is backstrap stuffed with pablano pepper, onion, and pepperjack cheese and wrapped in bacon and grilled.

Holy crap that sounds good.

mnhntr
August 26, 2013, 04:40 PM
Holy crap that sounds good.
When its done right it is the best. I like to use a sharp fillet knife and take a piece of strap about 8in long and basically cut while turning the backstrap making it a 1/2 in thick flat piece then roll it back up with the stuff rolled up in layers.

Arkansas Paul
August 26, 2013, 04:51 PM
That is gonna happen. That would be a good recipe to use with beef as well if you didn't have any venison on hand.

Speedo66
August 26, 2013, 05:39 PM
I have a Polish butcher cut up my deer. In addition to the usual cuts, he also smokes some venison jerky, and venison kielbasa, which is a form of sausage. Since it's smoked, it's ready to eat. It's also delicious and freezes well.

grubbylabs
August 26, 2013, 05:52 PM
I'm different than a lot of folks around here. I actually like the gamey taste of venison, so I don't do marinades. The only exception is when I grill whole backstraps. Then I like to marinade but it's thick enough that you still get the taste of the meat.
A guy told us once that he knew how to marinate deer to where it tasted just like beef. To which my dad replied, "If I wanted beef, I wouldn't get out of bed at 4:30 in the morning and freeze my butt off in a deer stand. I'd buy beef."

You can marinade your meat without making it taste like beef, the whole point is adding seasoning is to in hance the flavor, not change it altogether.

hipoint
August 26, 2013, 10:09 PM
don't get me wrong, I like venison, but after a couple of years of eating it as your only red meat, different things to do with it are mighty appealing...

I like the stuffed backstrap, haven't thought of that one yet!

Thanks for all the good ideas, keep 'em coming! haha, I can't wait to try some of them, we've been working too much on the farm the past couple of days to do much of anything fancy in the kitchen, but it's coming!

I've probably got 3 whole deers butchered in the freezer now! It'll be nice to experiment with some of your ideas!

Lloyd Smale
August 27, 2013, 08:29 AM
kind of my thoughts. Most years venision is the only red meat we use. Very little beef. I like the taste of venison just fine myself but it would be pretty boring to eat all of it pan fried without seasoning.

SleazyRider
August 27, 2013, 09:58 AM
Sleazy, instead of Tobasco on the side or in the stew, I use one quart of regular V8, and 1 quart of Spicy V8 as my liquid for the stew. Really gives it an awesome kick and adds more nutrition also. Try it some time. Let me know what you think.
Thanks, BigBore, I'll give that a try and report back ... if I'm lucky enough to get a shot at a deer this season, that is! Didn't even know they made spicy V-8.

Officers'Wife
August 27, 2013, 11:34 AM
Hi Lloyd,

All it takes is a little imagination and a lot of experimentation. One year I made the mistake of cutting shoulder meat in thin slices, steaming it until tender then wrapping it in a spiral with bread dough and baking the result like roll up dinner rolls.

Now during harvest time the men insist on having it prepared for "field meals" as you can wrap them in aluminum foil and put them on the exhaust manifold for a round to heat them up.

hipoint
August 27, 2013, 12:51 PM
officer's wife sounds like one amazing lady! haha, those sound really great and I'm glad to know there are others out there that utilize their engine as an oven like I do :-)

That sounds like an awesome recipe, thanks for sharing!

Officers'Wife
August 27, 2013, 01:13 PM
There isn't a farmer alive that hasn't used an exhaust manifold for a mobile stove. One employee keeps them on the manifold until the bread is very nearly 'toasted.' But it keeps the men happy and the machines rolling.

Keep in mind that I come from a loooong line of farm women. Keeping working men fed in the field is part of the definition. As I said before, the venison rolls were a mistake that I never should have tried.

hipoint
August 27, 2013, 01:38 PM
haha, folks where you're from must be a little more innovative than here. I know it's a VERY old idea, but everyone around here looks like I just showed them the meaning of life when they see a can of soup or something else on one of my engines :p

It does really help, I hate "stopping" for lunch so I usually don't but if I can grab a quick bite while doing something then I will. During the cold months having a nice hot something ready to go is just great though.

My gal is half filipino, they make a roll over there, can't remember the name off the top of my head, but it's a dinner type roll with ground meat, cabbage, spices and sometimes we add cheese. Those critters are awesome!

Officers'Wife
August 27, 2013, 01:52 PM
My Dad has an ancient John Deere "D" that still has remnants of "pork and beans" on the underside of the hood from my grandfather forgetting to punch a pressure release hole in the can. When you have X number of acres left to finish and there is rain/snow on the way you don't stop the machinery for an hour just to have lunch or supper.

I can do Lumpia but I prefer Pancit(s) and given time and inspiration can do justice to an adobo. (My great grandmother on my "real" dad's side was Pinoy.) I once took a goose pancit to a carry in dinner at the church. A number of people made some rather unChristian remarks that I didn't bring enough. :(

hipoint
August 27, 2013, 02:30 PM
lumpia and adobo are probably my favorites, poncit is a close second!

SleazyRider
August 27, 2013, 11:17 PM
My Dad has an ancient John Deere "D" that still has remnants of "pork and beans" on the underside of the hood from my grandfather forgetting to punch a pressure release hole in the can. When you have X number of acres left to finish and there is rain/snow on the way you don't stop the machinery for an hour just to have lunch or supper.

I can do Lumpia but I prefer Pancit(s) and given time and inspiration can do justice to an adobo. (My great grandmother on my "real" dad's side was Pinoy.) I once took a goose pancit to a carry in dinner at the church. A number of people made some rather unChristian remarks that I didn't bring enough. :(
Now hold on a minute! For the benefit of us "city slickers" here at THR, just what is lumpia, pancit, and adobo? Got any secret recipes you"d care to share?

hipoint
August 28, 2013, 01:41 AM
those are filipino recipes, kinda the "cheeseburger" of the philippines :)

Lumpia is basically a spring roll, I've made plenty of them, pretty much put what you want in them, mostly it's ground meat, cabbage, carrots and a few other shredded veggies... Deep fried :)

Adobo is as diverse as american chili is... the adobo that I know is like a chicken soup with rice vinegar and coconut milk and soy sauce. Sounds weird, but it's one of the best things I've ever eaten, it's served over rice. My gal is a filipina but I make better adobo than her haha, shhhh! :)

Pancit is really good too, basically a stir fry with rice noodles instead of rice. Those rice noodles are really good and SUPER cheap at an oriental store.

things are different depending on what area of the Philippines you are in, these are from north of manilla, an area called Tinang... I can get you specific recipes if you wish...

Ms_Dragon
August 28, 2013, 04:27 AM
I do mine cubed into 1 inch cubes and rolled in seasoned flour.
I put into the slow cooker, unbrowned, with
1 can of Guinness,
3 tablespoons of tomato paste,
4 cloves of garlic roughly chopped.
2 onions chopped.
2 carrots chopped.
1 stick of celery chopped.
1 large sprig of rosemary.
1 large flat field mushroom chopped.
4 prunes chopped fine.
Enough chicken stock to cover
and set the slow cooker on low for the entire day.

Serve with buttery mashed potatoes.

The prunes and the mushrooms make the gravy nice, dark and rich as does the Guinness.

Officers'Wife
August 28, 2013, 06:08 AM
Sorry Sleazy,

As HiPoint noted these are Pinoy dishes that I've adapted to NW Indiana. I've been 'exposed' to a number of cultures and brought them home to claim as my very own. There is nothing "secret" about them, just not familiar in most of the US. It's just that I can get hubby, kids and employees to eat pancit easier than I can sauerbraten so that culture is more on my mind.

Lloyd Smale
August 28, 2013, 07:12 AM
Hi Lloyd,

All it takes is a little imagination and a lot of experimentation. One year I made the mistake of cutting shoulder meat in thin slices, steaming it until tender then wrapping it in a spiral with bread dough and baking the result like roll up dinner rolls.

Now during harvest time the men insist on having it prepared for "field meals" as you can wrap them in aluminum foil and put them on the exhaust manifold for a round to heat them up.



another one i do at camp the guys really lick up is take some thin cut venison fry it with onion mushroom and peppers just like you would for a philly and then take the mixture hot and put it on a soft taco shell then add some cheddar cheese roll up and fry in a skillet with about a 1/2 of oil. turn them often until there a golden brown.

brainwake
August 28, 2013, 11:00 AM
We eat deer year round in my family. Funny enough, last week my wife made chicken fried pork chops. My son said..."hey this taste like deer". I said..."well...it's more like, deer taste like this. Most people don't eat deer as much as we do."

We eat deer several ways. The jerky of course is what most people love. I have won competitions at work with it. My kids fight over it and hoard it. I actually have to hide some for myself. The other popular way is of course frying it and some brown gravy....yum. But we will also roast it in crock pot with carrots, onions, and potatoes. The wife will also make deer stroganoff over pasta. and of course Chili.

Arkansas Paul
August 28, 2013, 11:26 AM
Ms_Dragon, that sounds delicious.

Ms_Dragon
August 28, 2013, 09:05 PM
Thank you Arkansas Paul!

The good thing about that recipe is it's really good with beef as well.

If your doing heavy work in the in the Winter...putting this on in the morning and then coming home and walking through the door and having this mouthwatering aroma greet you.
Nothing better.
A plateful of this and all is good and right in the world.

Officers'Wife
August 28, 2013, 09:41 PM
It sounds a lot like a recipe I have called "No Peek Stew." Put it in the oven and forget about it for 6 hours. Unfortunately during harvest and planting when SIL and I have to cook for a crowd we have neither oven or crockpot available.

One of our "field meals" is jerky, light cream, potatoes, peas, carrots celery and a touch of wild horseradish (as well as a bit of barley for thickening) baked into a Bisquik "pie" in a dutch oven. The jerky can be replaced with chicken, goose, duck or quail as well.

Buzznrose
August 29, 2013, 12:47 PM
awesome guys, I have gotten a couple new ideas here! alot of the stuff is what we already do with it, some have new twists. I hope you guys don't mind, but I'm copy/pasting the ones I really like and keeping them!

I got a really OLD recipe for turtle soup today from a lady who said her grandmother came up with it a hundred years ago. Give me a few to get it typed up and I'll share it here.


as per some of the questions, there is a STICKY regarding wild meat recipes, but it seems to have been abandoned/ignored hence myself posting this. I'd LOVE to hear recipes not only involving venison, but bear, boar, squirrel, rabbit... heck, anything you can cook! We do NOT have a hunters for the hungry around here, mainly because we do not have a licensed deer processing facility in our area. Funny thing, everyone who does come here to hunt ends up saying the same thing "you have more deer than anyone in the county here and you're the only one who doesn't want them around" haha. Our whitetail are generally pretty small here, never weighed one, but when my gal moved here from eastern north carolina, she joked about our deer looking like dogs :p

We most certainly eat everything we shoot here on the farm, and don't get me wrong, I AM thankful for all the bounty, but it does get old after a bit. Been trying to trade some off for beef, etc... but not had much luck. After over 2 years of deer being pretty much the only red meat we consume, I'm really looking for some new ways to cook the stuff!!! I usually don't shoot them during the hot months just because they're so hard to process and keep flies away, but it's about time to start up again...


OH, btw... here's something you fellas might not have heard of/done with it yet. I can quite a bit of ours in mason jars! works like a dang champ and WAY better than freezing, it'll keep longer and it's easier to prepare when you're ready to eat. I'll take some of the bones, boil them in a big stock pot to make a broth with LIGHT spices to taste (usually with a couple cubes of beef bullion too). You don't want to overspice it because that will make it harder to do different things with it later on... anyhow, after the broth is done, I'll lightly brown chunked meat, I don't cook it, just sear it enought to brown the outside over a high heat. Then I put the meat in the jars, add enough broth to cover it up (leaving enough headspace in the jar) and then pressure can it for the appropriate amount of time. When you go to use it in a stew, make a vegetable stew FIRST (using the broth from the jar). Then when the stew is actually done, dump the meat in. You do this because after canning it is VERY tender and will actually disappear in the stew if you try to put the meat in at the first. Works great, no worries about power outages, super easy to use, no thawing, and a good SHTF skill to have. You can use it in stroghanoff and plenty of other dishes where "stewed" meat would be called for. I find PINT jars are the perfect amount of meat for a decent pot of stew that would easily feed 4 folks for a meal.
Oh Yes! Canned venison ROCKS! I haven't had any for a few years, but when I liven in MT and AK, we always canned (mason jars) at least half of our venison, be it deer, elk, moose, etc. and HiPoint is right that you season it lightly, with salt, pepper, bullion, and maybe parsley. Then, when you're ready for stew, chile, soup, pasta, etc., just open the can and go to town. Personally, my favorite is just open a can, heat on the stove with frozen peas, and serve over mashed potatoes!

If you've never canned it, and you harvest a lot of meat every year, this is definitely something you should try.

ldlfh7
August 29, 2013, 04:11 PM
I love it all. There are so many uses for it but I prefer to smoke an arm roast on my smoker say 8 hours? Comes out tastier than a smoked pork butt. 2nd favorite use? Dog food. I take all the scraps and fat trimmings and grind it up and mix it with flour and veggies and bake in the oven. The dogs love it and nothing goes to waste.

witchhunter
August 29, 2013, 04:18 PM
Cut into 1/2 inch squares and brown it. add some burrito mix and some refried or whole beans. Grate some sharp cheddar and warm up some tortillas and have some mondo burritos....add homemade salsa of course. Think I'll pull some out of the freezer to thaw for dinner tomorrow.

Lloyd Smale
August 30, 2013, 06:56 AM
tell you another i ate at the neighbors camp one night that was good. They made venison fondue. The battered cubes of meat and deap fried them and had melted cheese to dip them in. Granted i had a few beers in my that may have added to the flavor but it was excellent.

brainwake
September 3, 2013, 11:15 AM
tell you another i ate at the neighbors camp one night that was good. They made venison fondue. The battered cubes of meat and deap fried them and had melted cheese to dip them in. Granted i had a few beers in my that may have added to the flavor but it was excellent.
Okay...now I am hungry.

Fred in Wisc
September 5, 2013, 12:11 PM
We do the "old school" knife only butchering, no meat saws.

Steaks- anything big enough gets cut into steaks.

The rest gets cut into stew meat, made into sausage, or ground into burger with about 40% pork (or bacon ends if they are reasonably priced).

Last year we made some venison boerewors (South African sausage) then smoked it. Definitely doing that again, it was out of this world awesome.

ridgerunner1965
September 5, 2013, 08:23 PM
i cant get enough of backstrap cut in 1/2 thick slices and grilled lightly over hickory coals.some times i grill 8 in sections of backstrap whole the same way.the trick is not to get it overdone,slightly red in the middle.a bit of salt and pepper rite before yu eat it and maybe some steak sauce.

any chunk of deer meat big enough to make steaks is frozen whole and sliced rite before cooking.my gfren will marinate in whatever we have handy with some beer and grill them over a real wood fire.i have to chop the wood lol!

the burger can be mixed with bit of oatmeal and soy sauce, bbq sauce or whatever yu have handy,add some finely chopped oinions to the mix and any garlic or oinion powder and you have a good burger.i like these with big slabs of homegrown tomateo and cheese.the oatmeal soaks up the liquid and keeps it in the burger, the oinion adds moisture as well.again cooked over a real wood fire.

for a good stew i cube up the meat and brown it in olive oil, then add oinions, green beans from the garden,carrots, taters,tomatoes sliced if i have them, a bit of okra if i have that also,maybe some peppers, dried or fresh,any kind.cook till thick and enjoy!

there is a hundred ways to make chili and they are all good.

sixgunner455
September 6, 2013, 05:27 PM
1-tender yearling roast, in the crockpot, with some herbs and seasonings.
2-ground, mixed with herbs and seasonings, formed into sticks and run through the dehydrator. Last batch I made, dog got hold of half of it and ate it all. I got one piece. :( she died a couple months later, and until this thread I didn't remember the jerky. :D
3-backstrap medallions, slow cooked on a cast iron skillet in red wine with mushrooms, parsley, etc. Maybe add a little bacon. You can do the same thing with dove breasts, or quail.

I just ate, and I'm sitting here dreaming about this stuff. Can't wait for the fall hunts!

Oh, I get to go chase elk next week with my daughter. If we both tag, we'll probably have to get another freezer. :D

Carmmond
September 6, 2013, 07:27 PM
Oh, I get to go chase elk next week with my daughter. If we both tag, we'll probably have to get another freezer.

Good luck..... hope you have to spend money in your future:)

boogieman
September 7, 2013, 09:20 AM
Marinated back straps cooked very rare on an open fire. Sliced thin and eaten with your fingers while enjoying a glass of homemade wine is my favorite. A very close second is a Hungarian style deer stew. Trick there is to let the meat cubes soak in cold water and rinse prior to cooking. Gets rid of that strong game flavor.

whughett
September 7, 2013, 09:33 AM
60% venison 40% pork with a hamburg grind. Use for anything one would use hamburg for.
50% venison 50% pork, favorite sausage spice mix.1/2 sweet, 1/2 hot. Hang the stuffed sausage on clothes line in a dry cellar over newspaper for a few days, tie into links, freeze. :rolleyes:

black_powder_Rob
September 7, 2013, 10:37 AM
My wife likes to cook it in a Thai red curry sauce, along with some lemon leaf, potatoes, some other seasonings and coconut milk served over steamed white rice. It is actually pretty good.

As for how I cook it, well I usually just marinate it in some vinegar, olive oil, and some seasoning and smoke it.

boogieman
September 7, 2013, 02:27 PM
As for how I cook it, well I usually just marinate it in some vinegar, olive oil, and some seasoning and smoke it.
Sounds like it would be rather dry? How hot, how long, and what cut do you smoke?

black_powder_Rob
September 7, 2013, 02:41 PM
The back strap and neck, for about 2 hours while liberally applying the marinade for the first hour and a half. As for temp I keep the vents pretty well shut and don't use to much wood. It took me a few trys to get it right.

dubbleA
September 8, 2013, 01:15 PM
My wife and I grind them up and make sausage out of them.

http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f268/dubbleA/9-29-08SausageSmoking.jpg

http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f268/dubbleA/Oct1stsausage.jpg

http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f268/dubbleA/OctSausage.jpg

hipoint
September 20, 2013, 11:30 PM
sorry, I was absent for a while folks! DubbleA, would you mind sharing your sausage recipe or is that some closely guarded secret that I'm making a taboo by asking for? haha

I've yet to be able to make my sausage taste worth a flip, it's not been bad, just not what I thought was "good". Also, I LOVE summer sausage, would love to learn how to make my own. We're building a smokehouse here on the farm, might as well since we're doing all this other stuff here...

I'll get on posting that turtle soup recipe, sorry I've been slack, just been fighting weeds here on the farm!

Thanks to all that have contributed so far!!!

oh, and since this is mainly a gun site, I just got a new toy, traded my .30-30 for a .30-06 in a savage 111 flavor... I'll miss the ol marlin, but it just made sense, I've already got a .30-06 that is scope only (browning a bolt) and the savage is irons only. Now I only have to worry about keeping ammo for one centerfire rifle. I'm already missing the "cool factor" of the marlin, but the savage makes more sense to have around... but MAN OH MAN that savage is a LIGHT little bugger and wow does it kick! My browning isn't bad, but this savage is a MULE!

JFtheGR8
September 22, 2013, 06:24 PM
I didn't read through all the posts so apologies if someone already covered this.

A crowd pleaser of mine has always been Italian venison sandwiches. Put a roast in the crockpot with a packet of Italian dressing mix, a jar of pepperoncini (salad peppers) and their juice. Put water in to cover the top and let it cook until you can pull the meat apart. Serve with provolone cheese on sub rolls and fresh salad peppers. Man I can't wait for deer season!


Posted from Thehighroad.org App for Android

der Teufel
September 22, 2013, 07:43 PM
I just wish we knew a truck driver that made runs to the southwest that could bring me a supply of fresh mesquite wood. I've always wanted to try smoking with that species.

I know mesquite has the reputation for being one of the best types of wood for smoking meat, but I hunt in Lee County, TX near the town of Lexington, which is where Snow's BBQ is located. A few years ago Texas Monthly magazine rated Snow's as having the best BBQ in the state! When I go there, all I see is stacks of oak wood for their smoking pits.

hipoint
September 22, 2013, 08:39 PM
Jeff the great... that sounds GREAT haha, sorry for the pun :neener:

sounds like a nice one for a good work day, start it early and when ya get back in, it's done!

Officers'Wife
September 22, 2013, 08:50 PM
I know mesquite has the reputation for being one of the best types of wood for smoking meat, but I hunt in Lee County, TX near the town of Lexington, which is where Snow's BBQ is located. A few years ago Texas Monthly magazine rated Snow's as having the best BBQ in the state! When I go there, all I see is stacks of oak wood for their smoking pits.
There is quite a bit of difference between preserving meat with smoke and barbequing over a wood fire. Oak is the hands down choice for the latter due to it's heat output and slow burning characteristics.

brainwake
September 23, 2013, 12:09 PM
When I first started smoking meat, I used mesquite. I find it to be very harsh and strong. I once smoked a turkey for 12 hours with mesquite, I found that the end of the day, I couldn't eat it. Everyone else loved it. But I had been exposed to too much of the smoke. I did enjoy the left overs the next day. So now I tend to go for the fruit woods, like apple or cherry. Pecan and Oak are also very good woods to cook with.

Arkansas Paul
September 23, 2013, 01:12 PM
I agree Officer's Wife. Oak is the way to go. That or fruit woods like cherry wood or apple wood.

A lot of people use hickory and I don't like it either.

Officers'Wife
September 23, 2013, 08:13 PM
I like hickory for smoke preserving, especially for making jerky and slab meat. I don't like to see it used for open fire barbequing mainly because it is more useful in other areas and we have far more oak available.

When my uncle was alive there was a neighbor that would bring him hedgeapple wood to run through his charcoal kiln. That guy claimed the charcoal was good for beefsteaks. As the old maid said when she kissed the cow, to each their own.

27hand
September 23, 2013, 08:49 PM
In order, I like the tenders, chops and jerky.

In preparing venison, I use the KISS principle. I am not a cook.

I slice the tenders or open up the chops, sprinkle some sea salt and onion-onion on, pack everything in butter & sear it at about 500 on the grill. I take them off rare and nuke them a little at a time till they are just rare of medium. Works for me.

http://i94.photobucket.com/albums/l103/poofy27/game%20pics/100_0696_zps51b45952.jpg (http://s94.photobucket.com/user/poofy27/media/game%20pics/100_0696_zps51b45952.jpg.html)

http://i94.photobucket.com/albums/l103/poofy27/game%20pics/100_0697_zps3d9354bb.jpg (http://s94.photobucket.com/user/poofy27/media/game%20pics/100_0697_zps3d9354bb.jpg.html)

http://i94.photobucket.com/albums/l103/poofy27/game%20pics/100_0454_zpsd4fe7332.jpg (http://s94.photobucket.com/user/poofy27/media/game%20pics/100_0454_zpsd4fe7332.jpg.html)







http://i94.photobucket.com/albums/l103/poofy27/Shooting%20hunting%20pics/ResizedImage_1368199416664_zps14fa32bd.jpg (http://s94.photobucket.com/user/poofy27/media/Shooting%20hunting%20pics/ResizedImage_1368199416664_zps14fa32bd.jpg.html)

Lloyd Smale
September 24, 2013, 06:31 AM
if you guys look for premaid sausage mixes try here http://www.askthemeatman.com/weekly_special.htm Best summer sausage and snack stick mix ive found and there fresh sausage mixes are real good too. there also an excellent company with GREAT product service. They will go out of there way to help you with any question or problem.

der Teufel
September 26, 2013, 12:55 PM
I attended a large family party/reunion a couple of years ago where someone had taken venison and cut it into small pieces maybe a 3/4" thick and 1.5" long (rough measurements). They then paired each piece with half a jalapeño pepper and wrapped that combination in a piece of bacon. It was all secured together with a toothpick and grilled.

Even the folks who said they "couldn't possibly eat Bambi . . ." had to try it and went back for more.

For Ms. Officers'Wife — regarding differences in choice of wood for smoking v. BBQ — I defer to you on that topic. That's WAAAY above my pay grade! :)

Elkins45
September 26, 2013, 03:02 PM
The back straps usually get rolled in garlic and black pepper then grilled.

Big roasts are done in a pressure cooker or crockpot. If I plan on eating them as-is then I will add beef stew mix and some beef broth. Super yummynwith horseradish sauce! I just use plain water if I plan to chop and mix with BBQ sauce for sandwiches.

Other cuts are ground for jerky or snack sticks, chili or goetta. If you don't know what goetta is you're not alone AFAIK it's only sold as a commercial product (pork) in the area around Cincinnati. It's a mix of onion, steel cut oats and ground meat that's formed into loaves or rolls, then fried. it's often served with applesauce or a fried egg. I have come to love venison goetta. Here's a recipe-just substitute venison for the beef and pork http://allrecipes.com/recipe/the-sarges-goetta---german-breakfast-treat/

I also made ground venison buckboard bacon last year from 50/50 deer and pork loin. You make loaves, smoke them, then slice and fry. Outstanding! Here it is coming off the slicer:

http://i292.photobucket.com/albums/mm35/elkins_pix/slicedbacon.jpg

Officers'Wife
September 26, 2013, 03:39 PM
I attended a large family party/reunion a couple of years ago where someone had taken venison and cut it into small pieces maybe a 3/4" thick and 1.5" long (rough measurements). They then paired each piece with half a jalapeño pepper and wrapped that combination in a piece of bacon. It was all secured together with a toothpick and grilled.

Even the folks who said they "couldn't possibly eat Bambi . . ." had to try it and went back for more.

For Ms. Officers'Wife — regarding differences in choice of wood for smoking v. BBQ — I defer to you on that topic. That's WAAAY above my pay grade! :)
Every year I end up allocated one ham per animal of each animal harvested. I wrap each ham, use a gravity system consisting of a five gallon water jug on a high shelf, to "inject" a mixture of saline, molasses and a powdered mix of various herbs and spices with a large bore needle into the femoral artery. After a few hours to "absorb" the mix the hams are smoked with a carefully proportioned mixed of apple, hickory and oak as well as a few green plants from the Jakobee swamp.

This process has made "Bambi eaters" out of three Illinois democrats, one self proclaimed vegetarian and a Catholic priest. It's not so much a matter of pay grade as circumstances throwing me into a family that regards producing food as a family calling.

brainwake
September 26, 2013, 05:44 PM
this post always makes me hungry.....good stuff

OH_Spartan
September 30, 2013, 09:18 AM
I cube the entire deer. The loins and back straps become kabobs (love greek marinades), the steaks become crock pot stew. The rest get a little beef added and ground to burger. Spaghetti, chilli, goulash. Oh boy I hope I get a deer this year

Speedster00
September 30, 2013, 05:06 PM
I slice my tenderloin down the middle and smear onion/chive cream cheese in it with garlic. Close it up and wrap it in bacon. Then smoke it. Its awesome..

Sleasys14
September 30, 2013, 06:04 PM
Tough parts go in the crock pot then get turned into BBQ. Tenderloins get slice in medallions and cooked med rare. Still learning other ways since I just started hunting last season.


Sent from my MiPhone !

hipoint
October 5, 2013, 01:06 AM
@ officers wife... WOW, that is an intense system for marinade! hahaha, I work in the emergency room as an emergency radiology tech (that's what supports this nasty farming habit until it can support itself), might just have to liberate a few large bore IV's from the CT box and give that a whirl. If nothing else than to show my friends and freak them out :what:

Glad to have made your acquaintance mam!

Hondo 60
October 6, 2013, 08:27 AM
Favorite use of deer meat?

Eatin it! - LOL

Used to be jerky, but diabetes killed my teeth, so I can't chew it anymore.
Snack sticks are great, so is summer sausage.

But really anything made with venison is good in my book.

kyle1974
October 12, 2013, 08:43 AM
carne guisada.... I could eat it once a week for the rest of my life the way my wife makes it.

Storm27m
October 13, 2013, 03:18 AM
I slice the meat into one inch cubes (meat quality depends on who the company is :evil:). I wrap each piece in half a piece of thin cut bacon and pin them with a toothpick. Next, they go into a 9x13 glass baking pan and get marinaded for about 24 hours. My favorite marinade is a mix of Mt. Dew, vodka, a few fresh squeezed oranges, a little Worcestershire sauce, some garlic powder, pepper, and a little salt. After letting them sit in the marinade, they bake for about an hour at 350 degrees.

They taste absolutely delicious and make great finger foods for party's or get togethers. They are a hit around here and everyone is always asking me to bring them to events.

Officers'Wife
October 15, 2013, 07:35 PM
@ officers wife... WOW, that is an intense system for marinade! hahaha, I work in the emergency room as an emergency radiology tech (that's what supports this nasty farming habit until it can support itself), might just have to liberate a few large bore IV's from the CT box and give that a whirl. If nothing else than to show my friends and freak them out :what:

Glad to have made your acquaintance mam!

Hi HiPoint,

Thank you.

Rule of thumb, if you can use it on a human being it's too small. When I say large bore I rob the vet not the hospital. Jorvet brand is what works best for me. The trick is to "adjust" the heat of the smoke to the amount of fluid injected. It's a bit like a pinch of salt, you know what it is but you can't put in measurement form. Oh, don't forget to tie off the top of the artery.

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