Colt Open Top Clones/Copies: What mods do you do/have done


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45 Dragoon
August 27, 2013, 03:46 AM
I was wondering what mods (if any) most folks do or get done to their Open Top revolvers (including cartridge O.T.'s). I go through mine as soon as I get them (before shooting) to "fix" what the factory did or didn't do. Keep in mind, I am not complaining. I think the Italians do a great job filling a huge need for us and at a reasonable cost. I add things that are needed such as a hammer stop and filler in the arbor hole as needed/ if needed. I start with the hammer stop, which stops all movement and prevents bashing of the hand. I do this by drilling and tapping a hole in the trigger guard and installing a set screw for the mainspring to bottom out on. The stopping point is dictated by the engagement of the full cock notch. At full cock, the trigger sear snaps under the notch and at the same time, the bolt locks the cylinder. The Colt S.A.A. (1873) has a built in stop. The hand has a boss where it attaches to the hammer. As the hammer is thumbed back, this boss contacts the stop when the hand reaches it's full travel.

Since our clones/copies don't have stops built in, this would be a worthwhile mod. If your revolver was in time before the stop was installed, it should still be "in time" ( as long as it's not binding while holding the hammer back). This will save you from replacing "worn out " hands ( they shouldn't wear out).

After smoothing and polishing (correctly) the action, I tune the springs to my liking. Then it's time to attend the barrel / cylinder gap. Yes, the short arbor thing !!!

Since this has been covered VERY well here at THR, I will spare the time and space. The only thing I would add is, resurfaced metal moves. It "sets", "wears in" when you shoot (That's why new guns are tight when you get um, loose after you shoot um !!!) I install cartridge conversions to be permanent so I go for a tighter gap (.003-.005) (I also don't reload any blk. powder). In doing so, I fit them to zero tolerance. This means NO binding of the cylinder whatsoever and a free spinning cylinder at half cock but no observed gap when pulling back on the cylinder with hammer down. When fired at the range, the natural "setting" will give you your barrel/ cylinder gap. My Dragoons will go to the range with a .004" gap, shoot all day and come home with a .004" gap. Life is grand !!!

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kituwa
August 27, 2013, 02:44 PM
I havnt done it yet, but you could cut a dove tail on the rear of the barrel and install a better sight. This would require a taller/better front sight too. You could use an adjustable rear sight also. Another thing that could be done is a dovetail rear that would extend back over the cylinder so it would have a longer sight radious. Some of the original Dragoons i believe did have a dovetail rear. For some people that want to make their open top guns shoot better for target shooting or hunting this would be a big help.

45 Dragoon
August 27, 2013, 06:10 PM
kituwa,
I had a 3rd Mod Dragoon by ASM that had a folding 3 leaf sight and was also cut for a shoulder stock.




Wish I still had that un . . . . . .

kituwa
August 27, 2013, 06:40 PM
I would imagine a 3rd model dragoon with the folding leaf site like that, would be a good setup for someone wanting to hunt with one.

45 Dragoon
August 27, 2013, 10:25 PM
I agree! That was a sweet gun but so was the 1st mod and the 2nd mod ! The 2nd mod (also an ASM) had nickel plated trig. guard and back strap with rose wood grip!!! It was purtty!! Wish I had um all back. Wish I new then what I know now, but that's the way it always is.

Hellgate
August 28, 2013, 06:24 PM
45 Dragoon,
Do you have a photo of this here hammer stop? I've got a lot of guns that have overtravel of the hammer when cocked and I'd like to eliminate that if possible but can't quite see where you are drilling.

rcflint
August 28, 2013, 09:52 PM
You drill up in the arch behind the triggerguard so the screw can be located under the mainspring near the top.

45 Dragoon
August 28, 2013, 10:28 PM
Hellgate, I will post some pics. late this eve. I went shooting today and will take some pics of a Dragoon with the stop. It will be the same on all SA's. rcflint is correct but I don't drill all the way through. Don't want a hole through my trig. guard.

Also, I will take some pics of a bolt block should you be interested in that as well.

45 Dragoon

45 Dragoon
August 29, 2013, 12:25 AM
Here are pics of the stop and the location of. You could drill all the way through and be able to adjust it but, you shouldn't ever need to adjust it unless you get a new hammer. I'd rather not have a hole through my trigger guard.Install with blue thread locker. Also, pics of my bolt block in this Dragoon. Fitted to zero tolerance, it allows absolutely NO side movement of the bolt (They ALL move without one, all mine have one.). Yes, the bolt you see in the pic has a cavity. Right up into the ball of the bolt (I make um lighter so the spring doesn't have to work as hard as everybody else' has to). The last pic is of my flush wedge. I did it with anticipating an ejector showing up on this and my other Dragoon. These Dragoons were made to allow fanning and no, I don't shoot them that way but, I can if I want to without fear of destroying them. These are BIG guns to be doing that kind of stuff with! This gun today shot a 1.25 inch group, off hand, 33 ft. First time out after some experimental surgery. Guess it worked. Barrel/cyl. gap didn't move so is still shy of .0015. we shall see . . . . .

45 Dragoon

Hellgate
August 29, 2013, 01:44 PM
45 Dragoon,
A picture saves a thousand words. Great photos. NOW I get it.

45 Dragoon
August 29, 2013, 02:23 PM
Glad to help. The bolt block has a tail that (can't see in the pic) hangs on the bolt screw. That keeps the back end of it located.

kituwa
August 29, 2013, 10:16 PM
That bolt block is an excelent idea. I can see where that could help accuracy.

45 Dragoon
August 29, 2013, 11:52 PM
It will def. hold everything still!! The main thing with having a block is making SURE the chamber/bore is dead on! Misalignment could cause higher than norm. pressures and wedge destruction a sure thing. Once done though, you are good to go. Another reason for the block or guide is to keep the bolt from moving and allowing cylinder throw-by and wrecking lock notches. When cycling the action fast, you can hear and feel the difference that solid lock-up makes. All these things together - hammer stop, bolt block/guide, tuned springs (don't like wire springs so much) makes your SA a fine "sports car" rather than a "grocery getter". Just like high end upgrades for a fine car, these are upgrades that will take your SA to the next level!!

45 Dragoon

rodinal220
August 30, 2013, 10:22 AM
I have a ASM Richards conversion of an 1860 Colt in 38spl that came with a 1/2(8-9oz) trigger pull,pretty common with these. I had to refit the hammer and trigger and increased the trigger pull to about 3 1/2lbs. Steel on these parts are soft and needed case hardened.

goon
August 30, 2013, 01:04 PM
I believe the guy on here named Strawhat also rebuilt an ASM conversion. I remember seeing them reviewed when they first came out, but I was just a child.

J-Bar
August 30, 2013, 04:30 PM
45 Dragoon:

So if I understand correctly, your bolt block is intended to prevent any lateral movement of the bolt, is that correct?

What does your bolt/trigger spring look like?

Thanks for the interesting photos.

45 Dragoon
August 30, 2013, 06:51 PM
J-Bar, you are correct. The bolt block is fitted to zero tolerance and allows zero perceived movement of the bolt. This is why you want to make sure of the bore/chamber alignment. The block/guide is used also for line boring the cylinder in the frame.If you were changing calibers in a revolver for instance, a .38-40 to .44 or .45 , doing it this way allows the gun to shoot 6 times like one gun (the most accurate) instead of 6 times like 6 guns ( like a norm. revolver)

The bolt / trig. spring is just like the normal spring. I put a spacer (washer) under mine and adjust the tensions for bolt and trigger separately to my liking. Most of the "wear till failure" comes from overly tensioned springs (like the way they come from the factory). That's why hand springs break. All S.A.'s should be treated to a good action job and the parts will reward you with a much longer life.

I might point out too, in the pic. with the bolt, the junction where the arms of the bolt join the body of the bolt is not square ( [ ) but rounded ( C). You do that (with a small round file) to spread the stress of the left or inside arm when it flexes as the hammer cam passes by.


45 Dragoon

Doak
September 2, 2013, 03:13 PM
Good stuff 45 Dragoon! Thanks!
Here's some parts I made in 1996, for a Signature Series 1851 I found at a gunshow.
Hand & cylinder locking bolt are made from automotive leaf spring. Hand pivot pin is 01.
Both springs are made from feeler gauges. Pick the thickness(s) that suit your fancy.
Hand spring is .012'' thick.
Cylinder is case hardened & tempered to stop wear in the locking slots & ratchet teeth, not for chamber strength.
Foto "Push Strip" shows nickel silver strip protecting cylinder face during barrel press-off. Aluminum & brass are alternatives.

Doak
September 2, 2013, 03:18 PM
Second set:

Doak
September 2, 2013, 03:22 PM
Last set:

Kindest Regards,
Doak

45 Dragoon
September 2, 2013, 09:55 PM
WOW ! Darn good looking parts Doak !!! I might have to put an order in !!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Like the mount system for the hand spring. I'm sure these are holding up great in the '51.

Do you cut the head on all your wedge screws?

45 Dragoon

BTW, Everyone should take note that in Doak's pic of the bolt, the junction of the arms and the bolt body are rounded not squared. Great job!

Doak
September 3, 2013, 12:45 AM
Well thanks 45 Dragoon! That you're savy about stress risers & radii got me all excited to show that there's more'n'one of us.:-D Actually, stress radii being an industrial standard, I'm flummoxed that the factories don't follow suit.

A nice thing about the hand...should the spring ever break, ya can keep the hand, & fit another spring to it. There's no stress point on the spring, 'cep for the ears, & they split the load.

I think the revolver came to me w/the screw head flatted off. I keep meanin' to shape the screw head into an eccentric, like a cam, to jam down on the wedge top surface, but...

This 1851 is my only open top. The thought of makin' more parts scares me off from gettin' more.:-D Might hafta cave in & go there. ROA's 'n' Rem '58's keep me depleted.

Kindest Regards,
Doak

45 Dragoon
September 3, 2013, 04:34 PM
Understand and thanks so much for sharing your photos. Hope you get the bug for a big open top! The parts are easier to fool with for sure!!

45 Dragoon

tpelle
September 10, 2013, 01:56 PM
On every BP pistol I've seen, the bolt is too wide to fit into the cylinder notches. When the bolt slides off of the hammer cam and the spring presses it up against the cylinder locking notch, only the "front" side of the bolt catches in the notch. What is holding the cylinder in alignment, most often, is the hand. But as the hammer falls, the hand, being pressed against the rear of the cylinder ratchet, also tends to try to rotate the cylinder a little bit backwards, out of alignment with the forcing cone. Not a good thing for accuracy, to say the least.

You can test to see if your cylinder locks up correctly by cocking your UNLOADED pistol, then, while gently lowering the hammer, with your other hand apply a little "reverse" rotational pressure on the cylinder (so as to try to "back it up"). If the cylinder, at any point during the hammer drop, can be rotated, then it's not locking correctly, and only the hand is holding it aligned at full cock.

So, on all of mine, I re-time the cylinder bolt so that it snaps up into the lead instead of right into the cylinder locking notch. (Snapping directly into the locking notch peens the side of the notch over.) Also I slightly thin the "rear" side of the bolt down so that it lets the bolt snap all the way into the cylinder notch. Too often the bolt is too wide to fit the notch.) As the cylinder is finally rotated into alignment, the bolt spring pressing upwards on the bolt allows it to snap fully into the notch, so it locks the cylinder from rotating in either direction.

45 Dragoon
September 10, 2013, 03:08 PM
Thanks tpelle, It certainly isn't good if your cylinder isn't locking up (not to mention rather dangerous!!!) Either me or you should be playing the lottery !! I'm not sure if I've had any that came not locking up but, I've def. had many that had some bad timing issues !! In either case, It's a good idea to always check all these things out, not just for your safety, but for those around you as well. Always make sure that you keep the sides of the bolt head (or ball) parallel and DO NOT make it a wedge shape. I'm thinking most of the probs. you've had has been just that. A wedge shape may pass a function test at the factory, but the isn't the right way to fit a bolt to the notches. And, you are right about the late drop (or rise ) of the bolt damaging the notches. That's why there is a lead or approach to the notch. While keeping the cylinder "cleaner" from unsightly scratches, it also allows the bolt to descend below the edge of the on coming trailing side of the notch and allow lock -up to occur. I think the norm. is for it to drop about a bolts width from the notch (I drop mine a little earlier, it's just me.).


45 Dragoon

tscmmhk
October 12, 2013, 11:41 AM
This is great info for the amateur black powder revolver gunsmith. Is all this information just "tribal" knowledge or is there a book / manual somewhere that summarizes all the stuff you guys are talking about. I am aware of most of the problems seen on the Italian repros but I don't always know the best way fix them. Thanks again for the info. I'll be installing a hammer stop on my 1860 Army today.

45 Dragoon
October 13, 2013, 11:39 AM
Good deal! You'll be impressed with the way it feels. And, if you do the bolt block thing, you'll be that much more impressed !! The stop (to me) makes the copies feel more Colt like than any other modification.


45 Dragoon

DoubleDeuce 1
October 13, 2013, 12:26 PM
Dragoon,

Can you post a photo of the bolt block out of the frame to show the tab you mentioned?:cool:

45 Dragoon
October 13, 2013, 03:44 PM
Yep, here ya go.

36forme
October 13, 2013, 05:32 PM
This is great reading and learning experience for me. I only own open top Pietta's which I plan to do some mods on.
I'm curious what you guys mean about tuning the springs. Do you replace them or thin the flat springs down a bit as we did in the day?
I really appreciate the time you guys take to post your mods. I will reciprocate.

45 Dragoon
October 13, 2013, 05:51 PM
Increasing or decreasing the orig. shape of the spring (usually). Doesn't take much to make a big dif. !! Greatly increases the life of the spring as well as the life of the parts that it affects. Handsprings always have more tension than needed and thus are usually the first to break (some if not most of this has to do with not having a stop). You need to induce space (if its not there already. depends on manuf.)between the spring and the backside of the hand.There shouldn't be any contact of the two during operation (except where it's attached of course).

Cap & ball revs. need most of the mainspring tension because of blow back through the nipple (cone). Cartridge revs. don't need near as much tension and it can be reduced by reducing the width of the spring from just above the screw hole all the way up. Go slow, and keep heat to a min.(quenching as you go), test often. Don't leave scratches and don't "hour glass"it.


45 Dragoon

DoubleDeuce 1
October 13, 2013, 07:27 PM
Dragoon,

Thanks for that extra photo. Brillant and simple!:cool:

36forme
October 13, 2013, 08:00 PM
I'm converting my pistols to gated conversions and will make my own ejectors.
36 cal. is my favorite, have a couple of 44's which will be converted also. Planning on reloading my own and using Trail Boss.
Thanks for the heads up on the springs.
I'm retired so once I get the shop set up it will be time to play. In the mean time I am trying to learn all I can.

36forme
October 13, 2013, 08:05 PM
Forgot to mention the 36's will get the barrels relined, so I don't have to mes with heeled bullets. I will also cut my own loading ports. Will be a while, I will post pictures when I do. Will have to learn to post pic's also lol.

IROCZ
October 15, 2013, 10:15 PM
Thanks 45 Dragoon for this thread. I'm going to tune up a Hawes .44 Navy that could use some improvement. Thanks again, I'll be back with questions I'm sure!

craiso
October 26, 2013, 12:14 AM
Here are pics of the stop and the location of. You could drill all the way through and be able to adjust it but, you shouldn't ever need to adjust it unless you get a new hammer. I'd rather not have a hole through my trigger guard.Install with blue thread locker.

45 Dragoon
What does this do for you besides a positive stop for the hammer. I like to use trigger stops in a similar fashion. Is it basically the same?

45 Dragoon
October 26, 2013, 11:04 PM
Craiso, The hammer stop keeps the hand from being the stop. Likewise, stopping the action stops the hand from applying pressure to the cylinder which wont be adding the pressure to the bolt. That will keep from battering the hand and the ratchet and the bolt head and the locking notches. In less words, it adds years of service to your revolver.

I don't know about a trigger stop, I've never felt the need for one in a single action revolver. It might save some trig spring pressure but I tune my springs individually and haven't had any probs.

45 Dragoon

45 Dragoon
November 9, 2013, 12:35 PM
Correction:

This post started with the idea that Colt S.A.A.s have a built in hand stop. I am not sure if this feature made it to production or was pushed aside early at some point. The stop feature was in the original design and a description of how the timing of the revolvers was set up around this feature by the assemblers. I would think , because of this, it must have existed in production at some point.

In the 1950's, when the "fast draw craze" was ignited, (thank you Hollywood and T.V. !!) the need to have single actions tuned and "set up" for this activity was a byproduct. The hammer stop was one feature that was used to stop the force of the action being cycled. Now, step back in time and you can see that the design of the Colt Peacemaker or Mod. of 1873 was ahead of it's time. The action of the "hand stop" would have had the same effect as a hammer stop . . . already built in !!!!! . . . . . . from the FACTORY !!!!!!
BACK TO THE FUTURE !!!!!!

I just wanted to set the record straight.

45 Dragoon

tscmmhk
November 9, 2013, 01:23 PM
Hey 45 Dragoon,

Completed the hammer stop mod on my 1860 Colt and you're right it does make a difference. Thanks again....I have another question about what you have done as far as modifications with reaming the the cylinder chambers. I have slugged the barrels / cylinders of all my cap & ball revolvers and have come up with the conclusion that the all the Italian (Pietta & Uberti) clones I own have under sized cylinder chambers. Some of the cylinder diameters are a good .007" smaller than the bore. I think this has to affect accuracy. So what have you done anything to deal with this?

Thanks

45 Dragoon
November 9, 2013, 02:04 PM
tscmmhk

Glad the stop worked well for you. I am a firm believer that it should be done to ALL S.A.s (even Colts) if for no other reason than to protect the parts (It does make them feel so solid).

As far as the chambers go, I don't have that problem since I shoot with Kirst conversions (all my S.A.s are dedicated cartridge guns). The chambers are the correct .452" to match the bore.
The Italian manufacturers prob. do this to help with any pressure related problems (not to mention liability reasons). If I shot c&b, I would prob open up the chambers to bore size ( if not .001-.002 over) like many shooters do.

45 Dragoon

savit260
November 10, 2013, 11:32 PM
This Pietta's had a few mods.

http://sphotos.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/11778_4057570886515_762020271_n.jpg

http://sphotos.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/579850_4057580046744_1499400968_3332100_1148638913_n.jpg


Action Job, defarbed barrel, Skinner front sight, R&D cartridge cylinder, lowered hammer. Work done by Hoof Hearted on the forum here.

REALLY need to find some decent grips for this.

45 Dragoon
November 11, 2013, 01:41 PM
Nice lookin groups !!! Nice lookin gun !!!!!

Hoof does really good work !!!



45 Dragoon

tembotusk
November 11, 2013, 07:11 PM
Savit260, Can you take a close up picture of the front sight and barrel?

I'm getting ready to install a taller sight on a round barrel and debating doing a dovetail or making a taller slot sight to replace the original.



Thanks!

savit260
November 11, 2013, 07:34 PM
Had a tough time focusing, but I hope this works for ya.

http://i30.photobucket.com/albums/c337/savit260/IMG_1367.jpg (http://s30.photobucket.com/user/savit260/media/IMG_1367.jpg.html)

EDIT: No idea why this isn't coming through resized with the orientation corrected ???? weird.

tembotusk
November 11, 2013, 08:49 PM
Savit260, thanks for the picture. It works for me!

(Regarding the focus, the camera might be too close to the subject, or the auto foucus has a mind of its own!!)

45 Dragoon
November 24, 2013, 09:31 PM
Savit,
What kind of cylinder is that ?

jaxenro
November 25, 2013, 11:06 AM
This is great with the pictures now I understand what your doing to my 1862 Navy. Really cool!

I was reading about another mod in the blackpowder revolver hunters group today where they modify the arbor to take full power triple-7 loads sounded interesting

tembotusk
November 25, 2013, 03:08 PM
I was reading about another mod in the blackpowder revolver hunters group today where they modify the arbor to take full power triple-7 loads sounded interesting

Can you provide a bit more info or a link?

jaxenro
November 25, 2013, 03:42 PM
http://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/internationalblackpowderhandgunhunters/conversations/messages/725

We have replaced all soft metal retainer pins with hardened spring steel roll pins cut individually to custom fit the pin slot which provide constant pressure on the arbor slot and will not bend under recoil. After the pins are fitted they were cold blued to provide protection against corrosion. The arbor is also turned insuring that all threading is good and if not the arbor is replaced if not repairable ( in the prototypes they did not require a new arbor). We in our prototypes have also heat treated the arbor to make it stronger and checked for tolerance to insure the cylinder to barrel gap is as tight as possible affording the highest velocities with each charge. Afterward all is assembbled with permanant commercial grade loctight which requires temperature of over 500 degrees farenheight to losen up therefore providing a hard bond surface which would be very difficult to loosen up.

savit260
November 26, 2013, 09:16 PM
Savit,
What kind of cylinder is that ?

The top pic with the target is the factory Cap & Ball cylinder. The bottom one is an Howell's 45 Colt cartridge conversion cylinder.

jaxenro
November 27, 2013, 03:14 PM
Be interesting to develop master list of mods from simple like a dovetailed front site to hammer stops, tuned actions, cap shields, lapped barrels, arbor modifications, etc. Plus a description of each

What about cutting the forcing cone, chamfering or honing the chambers?

savit260
December 4, 2013, 08:25 PM
Finally put some better looking grips on the 1860 :) Just a set of ebay cheapies but far better looking than what was on there.

http://i30.photobucket.com/albums/c337/savit260/IMG_1379.jpg (http://s30.photobucket.com/user/savit260/media/IMG_1379.jpg.html)

IROCZ
February 14, 2014, 03:17 AM
This thread is too good to die, Should be a sticky. Any how...Dragoon, what don't you like about the wire springs? I am assuming you mean the ones made by companies like Hienes?

45 Dragoon
February 14, 2014, 10:30 AM
IROCZ,
Thanks for the compliment!!
To me, the wire springs take away a lot of the feel you get with the flats. The best description i've seen so far is "mushy". It takes away the "snappy" if you will. I've used wires before, made my on before (for a long time actually) but always come back to the flats. Tuning the flat ones isn't hard to do and really allows more control of the feel and operation.
Likewise, coil and plunger hand set ups are nice but, the ability to adjust the hand action is taken away. With the coil you can increase/decrease tension. Too light and throw by can and will occur and, the tension set is constant. With a tuned flat hand spring, you can get all but a freewheeling cyl. but just enough tension at the last instant to thwart throw by. You just can't do that with a coil. I realize these are personal preferences but, most mods.are. After parts longevity, the S.A. can reflect the owner in it's modifications.

45 Dragoon

45 Dragoon
February 27, 2014, 07:28 PM
That last statement I made may seem odd but, you can set up your six gun for your particular type of shooting activity. Such as - target, fast action (cowboy action), reliability, fanning. Whatever you need, so it's poss. for the six gun to reflect it's owners likes/ needs.
45 Dragoon

avatarshots
February 28, 2014, 10:25 AM
@45 Dragoon, I SAW that ASM at my local gun shop yesterday!

45 Dragoon
February 28, 2014, 10:52 AM
Avatar, which ASM is that?

sltm1
February 28, 2014, 12:34 PM
Here's a Pietta i did some mods to. !st, a tuneup, then, shorten bbl, afix new front sight, contour the back strap, defarb bbl, make a plug for the lever and ram openings then pin it in place, reshape hammer, recrown bbl and change to 45lc. Also installed an anit-cap-jam pin for shooting as a percussion revolver...whew, long list

tpelle
February 28, 2014, 01:45 PM
I'm screwing up the nerve to de-farb the barrel on my two 1860s - I started on an old beater by burnishing the "BP Only" and "Pietta" rollmarks off of the barrel, which got rid of about 80% of the impression of those marks. Next step will be draw filing or otherwise polishing the barrel to get rid of the other 20%.

The other thing I want to do is to re-shape the rear of the barrel lug. On the Piettas that I have the sweeping contour at the rear of the lug comes to a sharp point, and I want it to be more gently curved like the originals.

I've had good luck with cold blue, so I may just refinish with that and go ahead and do an "antique" finish on them.

Just need some time and ambition.

45 Dragoon
February 28, 2014, 06:08 PM
Sltm1 , LIKE it !!!! That'd be a great carry gun for me !!! Also, what conversion do you use?

sltm1
February 28, 2014, 06:21 PM
45 Dragoon, it's a Howell 5 shot for several reasons. The 6 shot R&D's had slanted chambers to get all six in, this one has safety notches so you can carry it fully loaded safely and, when it comes right down to it, you can swap out cylnders much faster than you can unload and reload with a gated cylinder. Taylors has (had?) them for $200.

45 Dragoon
February 28, 2014, 07:14 PM
Yeah, not big on slanted chambers myself. I'm a little anal when it comes to tolerances and that kind of stuff. My '60 is a five shooter as well (kirst) but it's a perm. set up. What kind of bbl/cyl gap are you running?

sltm1
February 28, 2014, 07:58 PM
Now this is gonna sound way out of line, but, hammer down, none, widest gap while cocking, .021. This gun took a lot of fitting to get it to work, and it does, so i'm not gonna fool with it any more. I could change it some by shortening the hammer face and then some other stuff, but then it probably wouldn't shoot cap and ball style, not a big concern, but I might wanna some day.

kBob
February 28, 2014, 08:57 PM
sltm1,

I do like the Manhatten like extra safety knotches...... been thinking about trying to ad one to a revolver just for giggles. Is there an issue with timing going back and forth between a five shot .45 Colt cylinder and a .44 percussion cylinder?

-kBob

sltm1
February 28, 2014, 09:28 PM
Not at all, the ratchet is configured to give the hand a longer stroke (more engaged time) on the five shot cylinder

Smokin'Joe
February 28, 2014, 09:57 PM
kBob, I added a Manhattan style safety notch to a .44 cal. cylinder.

http://i1215.photobucket.com/albums/cc510/SmmokingJoe/IMG_02195.jpg

Here's how I did it:

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=633020

avatarshots
March 1, 2014, 12:47 AM
I have a Belgian made 1960-1860 Centennial, which is probably the best 1860 ever made. The company began remaking them on the 100th anniversary of the 1860, under the same Colt license they held from the 1800's.
I've not made any mods because it's perfect as is.

hartcreek
March 1, 2014, 02:05 AM
I do not like that Manhattin safety. I prefer the single dowel pin method cus the hammer is sitting on a land and held in pplace by the piano wire dowel pin.

Smokin'Joe
March 1, 2014, 09:36 AM
I agree with what 45 Dragoon says about trigger springs:
To me, the wire springs take away a lot of the feel you get with the flats. The best description i've seen so far is "mushy". It takes away the "snappy" if you will. I've used wires before, made my on before (for a long time actually) but always come back to the flats. Tuning the flat ones isn't hard to do and really allows more control of the feel and operation.


However, I find that a wire bolt spring is superior in function and longevity to the original flat type. Check out my simple and inexpensive modification that is on the High Road Sticky list:

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=623759

BerettaGhost
May 23, 2014, 02:48 PM
PM Sent

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