carrying two big guns at the same time


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Revolver Ocelot
August 28, 2013, 12:03 AM
I know this may sound like lunacy to some but I'm curious as to the feasibility of carrying a 4" gp100 strongside and then carrying a 3" sp101 at the same time.

Now trouble is, I ask myself "where would I carry the sp101?" and I draw a blank.

Any ideas?

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Old Fuff
August 28, 2013, 12:41 AM
They're a number of ways to do it, but why? Do you live in a particularly dangerous environment? :confused:

Mat, not doormat
August 28, 2013, 12:58 AM
It's not lunacy. With revolvers, the Achilles heel is capacity, with an additional limiter of slow reloads added on, just to add insult to injury. Carrying several of them is a good solution, if you care to deal with the resultant weight penalty.

Were it me, I'd be looking at carrying one on the strong side hip, and one on the weak side. If you're already wearing a gun belt, hanging another gun off of it is no problem. If you're already wearing a cover garment, it'll cover both hips as easily as one. All you need to add them is the second holster. It also gives you a gun available to either hand, in case one is occupied or injured.

A close second would be one strong side and one cross draw. The cross draw makes the secondary available to the strong hand, as well as the weak. It gives you an easy gun to access while sitting. It really turns the second revolver into a second primary, rather than a traditional BUG. The disadvantage is that they can be harder to cover.

A third option would be a double shoulder rig. They actually work better than a single rig, as the load is more balanced. They only work well with certain body types, though, and can be obnoxious if you don't like having straps bearing on your shoulders all day. After all, you wear a belt anyhow, so that can be easier to learn to live with.

Both the guns you've picked are fairly bulky for their payloads, but that bears fruit in their shootability. A four inch gun is still plenty carryable. Just look at all the people packing commander and government model autos. When I was young and broke, my first carry gun was a police trade Model 10, with a four inch bull barrel. Made the long midnight shifts at the gas station much more comfortable.



Sent from my C771 using Tapatalk 2

Revolver Ocelot
August 28, 2013, 01:01 AM
Alaska, don't think 11 shots of 357 will do me a terrible lot of good vs a grizzly.

A comment in the thread I had earlier (one that you were kind enough to comment on), got me thinking about the possibility of it. Truth of the matter is I have no reason to need to carry both guns, but I can't help but think why not?

tarosean
August 28, 2013, 01:32 AM
Why not an N frame 8-shot 357.. that way your only down 3rds compared to carrying two heavy guns..

gamestalker
August 28, 2013, 02:10 AM
I've carried two before, and still do from time to time. I liked to carry one of my snubby .357's and on the other hip cross draw, I had either a SA 44 mag. SBH, or if I really felt like getting a work out, I would strap on the SRH 44 mag. on my strong side, and then the SA would be cross draw. Both obviously open carried of course.

I've also carried two AL pistols, or one wheel gun, one wheel gun, and even an occasional wheel gun conceal carried shoulder strap, and one on each hip also, three total in other words.

GS

Revolver Ocelot
August 28, 2013, 02:35 AM
tarosean, that was another option I was considering. So far the ones that strike my fancy just don't seem to be reasonably holsterable, and I'm kind of a ruger guy.

Sergei Mosin
August 28, 2013, 02:42 AM
On the occasions when I've carried two revolvers, it's always been a GP100 on my hip and an LCR in my pocket. Never tried to carry two big guns at once.

Rangegod
August 28, 2013, 10:04 AM
http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=188263&stc=1&d=1377698551

System advantages include:

31 rounds without the need of a reload.
Greater flexibility by ensuring a weapon is available from almost any position and to both strong or weak side.
Greater reliability by allowing multiple component failures without loss of system function (i.e. two is one and one is none philosophy carried to the extreme).
Ability to arm up to four trusted companions if needed. For example; when trapped in an abandoned warehouse with a psycho killer on the loose. (Hey it could happen.)

Sam1911
August 28, 2013, 10:14 AM
LOL Rangegod, that's pretty funny! I think I saw that guy in one of the Naked Gun movies! :D

Actually, a second gun isn't a terrible idea, but every person will have to come up with their own concept of risk-vs.-bother.

If I was going to carry two revolvers, I THINK I'd do it strong-side and cross-draw. I think.

But, by the time you're willing to alter your routine and effort far enough to carry two wheelguns, most folks would throw in the towel and switch to an auto with 16-20 rounds in it anyway and fast reloads on tap.

moxie
August 28, 2013, 12:40 PM
Ditto Sergei in post #8.

Cosmoline
August 28, 2013, 01:36 PM
The only practical reason would be as a NY reload instead of trying to use speed loaders. I've often wondered if I'd be dexterous enough to reload in a genuine fire fight. So you just drop one and grab the next instead.

For carrying two I've tried a variety of methods. A shoulder rig is OK as far as balance but gets bulky fast. I found it too bulky with two Security sixes for example.

One approach you might try is a standard belt CCW and then a small piece in deep concealment like thunderware, an inside pocket or Null rig.

But if you're set on two full size revolvers, then you may be looking at a heavy weight duty belt and open carry, maybe with suspenders to help take some of the load.

Revolver Ocelot
August 28, 2013, 01:44 PM
I was considering a shoulder holster, I would prefer a vertical shoulder holster but couldn't find one for the sp101 that fit the bill.

The idea was to use this as a new York reload, I had also considered crossdraw, but I have concern that it could still be visible through an open coat.

gamestalker
August 28, 2013, 03:51 PM
I carry cross draw almost exclusively. And if you shift it more to the back of your hip it will remain pretty well concealed. But it also depends on how large the firearm is. I usually carry a round butt snub K frame, and I turn it slightly, so the butt of the grip is facing to the front. This helps it to lay against me, rather than creating a big noticeable lump in my shirt or coat. And drawing from this angle is very natural and comfortable for me, but that's me.

GS

1858
August 28, 2013, 04:23 PM
I know this may sound like lunacy to some but I'm curious as to the feasibility of carrying a 4" gp100 strongside and then carrying a 3" sp101 at the same time.

I'm carrying an LCR at 4 o'clock in a Galco OWB holster and have a Cozy Partner ankle holster which works great with the LCR too. The problem is that I only have one LCR at present but once I get another I'll be carrying both. The LCR isn't a "big" gun and that's why I wouldn't have a problem carrying two. I can't imagine carrying a GP100 and an SP101 at the same time ... and I have both of those revolvers.

AFDavis11
August 28, 2013, 05:36 PM
Those aren't big guns. A little heavy maybe. I'd prefer to carry the GP in a shoulder holster and the tiny 101 at 4 on the strong side. But there are lots of options.

ArkieVol
August 28, 2013, 09:25 PM
Nobody's mentioned hiring a gun bearer to walk behind you with extra guns and ammo....and water and snacks if the going gets really tough.

tomrkba
August 28, 2013, 09:38 PM
Carry a snubby in in the appendix position IWB. Carry the larger gun strong side. I have settled on using Safariland #371 speed loader holders and Comp X holders (where X is the version that fits your gun). You could put one between the butt of the gun in front and the holster of the strong side gun. This way you get one full reload. This configuration gets you the very fast appendix carry draw, as well as a strong side draw.

Alternatively, carry the second gun on the weak side (either the strong side or appendix) and two ammo holders on the strong side. This will negate the speed advantage of the appendix carry gun.

Another option is to simply carry a Ruger LCR or S&W J-Frame in a pocket. The problem here is the speed loader won't work if your primary gun holds six or more shots. You'll need to keep at least a speed strip in a pocket. I always have at least one full reload for each gun.

Nobody's mentioned hiring a gun bearer to walk behind you with extra guns and ammo....and water and snacks if the going gets really tough.

Sigh. People carry backup guns all the time.

Sam1911
August 28, 2013, 09:43 PM
Just a note to point out that the appendix carry position does seem fast to a lot of shooters. Take the time, with a timer, to prove to yourself whether it actually IS fast before you go to the trouble of carrying up front.

Many accomplished shooters have been unable to measure actual speed benefits from that style of carry, but everyone's different and you may be special in that regard.

But don't guess. Prove it.

Revolver Ocelot
August 28, 2013, 10:03 PM
I actually have an appendix rig for my lcr, and a shoulder holster for my lcr for when I'm carrying my gp100. I was just wondering what would be a good way to carry the sp101 in place of the lcr when I could get away with it, but it would seem as though getting another lcr would be another potential solution.

Deaf Smith
August 28, 2013, 10:12 PM
I know this may sound like lunacy to some but I'm curious as to the feasibility of carrying a 4" gp100 strongside and then carrying a 3" sp101 at the same time.

Now trouble is, I ask myself "where would I carry the sp101?" and I draw a blank.

Any ideas?
Yes you can pack two at once.

What is more, if you lose 20 lb in weight (fat gut weight) then you can pack REAL big'uns.

That GP and SP can be done several ways but a strong side holster for the GP and weak side one for the SP is the most logical.

Deaf

murf
August 28, 2013, 10:15 PM
carry one cross-draw, the other twist-draw.

murf

tomrkba
August 29, 2013, 08:53 AM
Just a note to point out that the appendix carry position does seem fast to a lot of shooters. Take the time, with a timer, to prove to yourself whether it actually IS fast before you go to the trouble of carrying up front.

Many accomplished shooters have been unable to measure actual speed benefits from that style of carry, but everyone's different and you may be special in that regard.

But don't guess. Prove it.


That makes sense. Timers do not lie if the shooter puts in 100%. The main point is to have another place to carry the second gun that is comfortable along with at least one full reload for each gun. I like to set up things so one gun is available on each side. I find pocket carry works well for the secondary gun. However, he is using a GP100 and SP101 combo, so he only has four viable locations to carry the SP101. He could pocket carry the SP101 if his pants will allow it, but most people do not wear pants like that. I do not consider the small of the back to be a good location for it, but it could be carried there. It is likely a bit big for ankle carry. I have never been able to effectively conceal a gun in the crossdraw position unless it was very small. This may be a good option to try.

Appendix carry works well for me if my hands are at my sides or in "The Fence" position. I like to think about what I am doing and try to draw the gun closest to my current hand position. Concealing garments slow things down, but I found that clearing the garment with one hand and following it immediately and simultaneously with the drawing hand makes for a faster draw. One does have to use two hands for that and the situation may dictate that one hand be used for something else such a holding a child or warding off a knife.

Mixing guns with different capacities may not be the best choice from a reloading standpoint. I would not carry one five and one six shot speedloader on my belt. It would be too easy under stress to grab the wrong one for the gun in hand. I would carry the five shot loader or speed strip in a pocket. Also consider how you reload. Which hand do you load with? I transfer the gun to my right hand and load with my left. I keep all ammunition on the left side. Place your ammo accordingly around the holsters.

Didn't Jelly Bryce carry two S&W Model 27 revolvers? I am curious how he, and other old timers, carried spare ammunition.

tomrkba
August 29, 2013, 09:07 AM
carry one cross-draw, the other twist-draw

Twist draw is butt forward on the strong side?

Torian
August 29, 2013, 09:10 AM
Why not an N frame 8-shot 357.. that way your only down 3rds compared to carrying two heavy guns..
That's what I have...loaded with 180 grain leadcast pumping along at 1450 FPS.

PabloJ
August 29, 2013, 10:32 AM
That's what I have...loaded with 180 grain leadcast pumping along at 1450 FPS.
You know Sasquatch is figment of human imagination, right?

Sam1911
August 29, 2013, 12:11 PM
Hey, you never know when you might be out on the town and suddenly be struck by the urge to run into the bushes and hunt boars.

It happens...!

Old Fuff
August 29, 2013, 12:42 PM
That's what I have...loaded with 180 grain leadcast pumping along at 1450 FPS.

Oh shucks, that’s nothing. My little .38 pocket blaster is stoked with 148-grain full-wadcutters that depart the muzzle at a blinding 680 FPS. Folks got to stop fooling around… :uhoh: ;)

PabloJ
August 29, 2013, 01:18 PM
Ma uses Webley & Scott 'Wartime Finish' .38 with 145gr full patch loads at about 700fps. Serious HD load for dark inside the house conditions. Like you said there is no reason to fool about.

Greg528iT
August 29, 2013, 02:02 PM
Rangegod, what about the ankle holsters??

Rangegod
August 29, 2013, 02:22 PM
Rangegod, what about the ankle holsters??

Only if I have to go into the "City". Then I add a S&W 317 and 351PD in right & left side ankle holsters and a 2.5 inch S&W 325PD in a shoulder rig. Around town I feel 5 is enough.

BTW, at 6'4", I make it a habit to avoid any body of water over 5 feet deep.

JAC

FM12
August 29, 2013, 02:26 PM
I like to carry two large guns at a time also. I bought a cheap double shoulder holster rig off ebay. Not real pretty but works pretty well. The weights are offset which is a plus. JMO, YMMV.

moxie
August 29, 2013, 03:10 PM
rangegod,

A guy your size might squeeze an M79 under the arm pit too. Think about it. Might cut the stock down a bit. Single shot but it really lights 'em up! Don't want to be undergunned.

Revolver Ocelot
August 29, 2013, 03:41 PM
BTW, at 6'4", I make it a habit to avoid any body of water over 5 feet deep

The mental image was priceless.

I have a friend that's is 6'4" (proportionately tall at that) who occasionally iwb carries a desert eagle under a loose fitted polo shirt. It's amazing the things you can hide on your person when you are big enough.

Mat, not doormat
August 29, 2013, 05:36 PM
That makes sense. Timers do not lie if the shooter puts in 100%.

Actually, a timer will very much lie. It won't tell you which technique is faster, but only which one you are more proficient with.

Gene Pearcy says he needs to have ten thousand repetitions on a new technique before he feels he can make a viable comparison. That might be a but much for a CCW draw, but you get the idea.

Sent from my C771 using Tapatalk 2

jimbo555
August 29, 2013, 05:46 PM
As long as you don't have to walk around too much!

AKElroy
August 29, 2013, 05:59 PM
The LCR is plenty light enough for pocket carry. I would strong side the 4" at 5o'clock and drop the LCR in a nemesis for the left side.

Mat, not doormat
August 29, 2013, 05:59 PM
As long as you don't have to walk around too much!
If five lbs of guns are that crippling, however do guys who wear tool belts or backpacks manage it? :rolleyes:

Revolver Ocelot
August 30, 2013, 01:25 AM
That's what I have...loaded with 180 grain leadcast pumping along at 1450 FPS.

I miss double taps 357 200gr offering....

armsmaster270
August 30, 2013, 02:10 AM
Here is my carry Sig 226 in 357Sig w/125gr Gold Dots and S&W 340PD 357Mag Airlite with 135gr Gold Dots. I still have sealed boxes of 357 Black Talon 180gr. but not in an airlite

http://i239.photobucket.com/albums/ff207/armsmaster270/Guns/dec08-feb09130.jpg

MartinS
August 30, 2013, 09:18 AM
The small one goes weak side appendix. Practice. You are also covering for something bad happening to your strong side arm/hand. Practice.

Haywood
August 30, 2013, 10:29 AM
I would carry my 7 shot 357 on the waist right side to main gun. And in the waist with my SP101 on the left. Weather it be cross draw or ? I have read on another forum, a former Oficer carries on belt left and right and in pocket for his Third Gun.

RealGun
September 1, 2013, 08:52 AM
murf - <>carry one cross-draw, the other twist-draw.

Agreed on the cross draw. I started with twist draw but learned that one sweeps their strong side when they draw that way.

tomrkba
September 1, 2013, 11:00 AM
Quote:
murf - <>carry one cross-draw, the other twist-draw.
Agreed on the cross draw. I started with twist draw but learned that one sweeps their strong side when they draw that way.


Twist draw is a NO-GO then! It is easy enough to mistakenly shoot oneself when drawing or holstering a gun without tempting Murphy. I watched a guy put a round through his back pocket holstering a pistol in a strong side holster. Instead of stopping when he felt resistance, he pushed harder! Ask Tex Grubner about the dangers of drawing a gun!

Mat, not doormat
September 1, 2013, 02:48 PM
Twist draw is a NO-GO then! It is easy enough to mistakenly shoot oneself when drawing or holstering a gun without tempting Murphy. I watched a guy put a round through his back pocket holstering a pistol in a strong side holster. Instead of stopping when he felt resistance, he pushed harder! Ask Tex Grubner about the dangers of drawing a gun!

There's a right way and a wrong way to do the cavalry twist. The wrong way does indeed sweep the muzzle across most of your gastrointestinal tract. The right way however, (withdraw the gun partway, twist it straight, proceed as normal, OR draw with gun reversed, then twist upright once pointed down range,) is as safe as any other draw.

It's just unnecessarily slow and complicated. Its cardinal virtue is that the gun carried thus is available to either hand, however this is obviated by carrying a second gun.

Sent from my C771 using Tapatalk 2

Gordon
September 1, 2013, 05:52 PM
I carried this on my last Alaskan hunt in 2007 . The 4" comes out quick and I can easily wear it alone in town (1988 Mountain Revolver .44 mag) and the 6.5" 629 provides more power and range and I normally had 300 grain +p loads in it.:evil:
http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i203/gordonhulme/006.jpg (http://s73.photobucket.com/user/gordonhulme/media/006.jpg.html)

murf
September 2, 2013, 12:24 PM
tomrkba,

if you google "twist draw", you will find an excellent video on youtube on the proper technique of the draw. the author emphasizes the safety of the draw.

wild bill hickock is famous for using this draw method.

murf

Rexster
September 13, 2013, 12:30 PM
Not lunacy at all. I spent plenty of time carrying a 4" revolver on the right hip, and a second revolver, up to 4", in a different place: left hip standard draw, left hip crossdraw, left or right front crossdraw, left or right appendix, vertical shoulder rig, and in a Safepacker, either carried or worn in various location on the belt. I have probably forgotten a few! The common denominator has virtually always been standard draw on the right hip.

Obviously, not all of these are equally concealable in street clothes; some work better under rain gear, raid jackets, and such.

"Front crossdraw" means appendix, but the weapon's grip oriented for crossdraw.

During much of this time, one or the other weapon may well have been a 1911, Glock, SIG, or other service/duty-sized autoloader. I am not so much a revolver guy, as a guy who likes both revolvers and autos. :)

All else being equal, if one weapon was a 1911, it was the one on the right hip, as I do not like ambidextrous safety levers. If one weapon was a Glock, it has likely been the lefty weapon, and the revolver the right-hand weapon, as only my left trigger finger has truly become indoctrinated to the Glock trigger.

9mmfan
September 13, 2013, 01:41 PM
Not something I do as a matter of course, as open carry is not allowed in Texas barring a few circumstances, but I am set up to carry these:
http://i414.photobucket.com/albums/pp225/9mmfan/D059F120-AFA7-4CBF-AE03-BFFA354B660D-17266-00000D885119154C_zps92b260e7.jpg

Thusly:
http://i414.photobucket.com/albums/pp225/9mmfan/88F92C89-ABBE-4C38-B481-929552C619F2-4567-0000039248B8E266_zps10f63245.jpg

The shoulder holster isn't anchored to anything in this pic, and normally wouldn't ride quite that far back. I was amusing my wife, as well as getting ready to shoot both of the pistols.

mr.trooper
September 13, 2013, 01:49 PM
Bears at 4 posts in.

The short of it is you want more than 6 shots. That's just not revolver territory.

JFrame
September 13, 2013, 02:22 PM
I am reminded of this scene with Isaac Hayes in "I'm Gonna Get You, Sucka"... :)


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zhe58xORWG0


.

Revolver Ocelot
September 13, 2013, 06:33 PM
jframe, I have never seen that before, and I don't know how I've made it this far without seeing that. I think it answers my question too.

JFrame
September 13, 2013, 09:20 PM
jframe, I have never seen that before, and I don't know how I've made it this far without seeing that. I think it answers my question too.

It gives ya a lot of options, Ocelot! :D


.

Revolver Ocelot
September 13, 2013, 09:26 PM
Makes me think I've been asking the wrong question, how do I carry two guns? How about ten guns?

tomrkba
September 13, 2013, 10:50 PM
;)

Two is easy to do and not a problem. I've tried to get to 10 and it's tough to do if you use holsters. I felt like I was wearing a gun diaper. Both back and front pockets (4), Smart Carry (1) or appendix, small of back (1) and strongside (2). Add two with long guns slung, but that's cheating. Dual shoulder holsters would get you two more. If you don't require holsters, just stuff them into boots or socks, pockets, belts, etc. Walking is nearly impossible. Limiting yourself to two is better.

JFrame
September 14, 2013, 01:46 PM
Hmmm...We've all heard the phrase, "Two is one, and one is none"...

Perhaps that saying should ACTUALLY be, "Ten is nine, and nine is eight"...? http://www.kolobok.us/smiles/artists/just_cuz/JC_thinking.gif







http://www.kolobok.us/smiles/standart/grin.gif

Claude Clay
September 14, 2013, 02:07 PM
The only practical reason would be as a NY reload...

add -- and as life comes at you from every which way, you have 2 hands...
use each as needed if each has something to hold; and you have trained accordingly.

i carried for work strong-side a defender or a p239/40 and weak-side in a vest or coat pocket a 642 or a 332. the pockets were enlarged and reinforced. any coat (cold weather or rain type) that covered my IWB primary had a slit cut in the pocket such that my hand could pass through and access the gun. twice that was a deciding factor in deflecting unwanted advances from 'strangers'.
and having my hand wrapped around a revolver in the same pocket 'they' saw me put the car keys in ( there was a divider) worked to change their minds when they demanded my car keys but i took out something unexpected instead. also when talking to people who may be feeling you out, having a hand in a coat pocket with a gun throws them off their game as you are not acting like a victim yet they can not see your little friend.

NY re-load or covering more bases...whatever works for you.

X-Rap
September 14, 2013, 10:32 PM
Sounds like the OP is headed to AK. To me a much more sensible thing than two handguns would be a nice 4"- handgun to carry at all times and a short carbine of the same caliber to add when in the bush.
If in town and thinking the wheel gun is to short on ammo add in a 9 or 40 auto with a spare mag.

Revolver Ocelot
September 15, 2013, 01:31 PM
Sounds like the OP is headed to AK

Funny you should say that, I'm already there.

B!ngo
September 16, 2013, 01:05 AM
I don't suppose I could convince you to carry just one Glock 20 with a 15 round magazine? It's approaching the power of a 38/357 (or more for some loads) and will enable you to run more quickly to or away from your opponent since your pants won't be down around your ankles.
Just a thought...
B

Gordon
September 16, 2013, 01:39 AM
My rig for AK I pictured used the strap for the longer butcher type Mad dog blade worn over the shoulder , the MD "Dundee rig" . It fully supports the tactical belt front and rear ala Sam Browne style. Like I said the 4" light weight Mountain revolver slips off the belt for times not beating the bush actively hunting ect. A 300 grain .44 magnum will take down quickly any thing that walks the US, properly hit.

RealGun
September 16, 2013, 03:11 PM
I don't suppose I could convince you to carry just one Glock 20 with a 15 round magazine? It's approaching the power of a 38/357 (or more for some loads) and will enable you to run more quickly to or away from your opponent since your pants won't be down around your ankles.
Just a thought...

That assumes one is still able to run these days. :scrutiny:

tommy.duncan
September 16, 2013, 03:18 PM
Looking at Rangegods' picture reminds me of Isaac Hayes part in I'm Gonna get You Sucka. LOL

Revolver Ocelot
September 16, 2013, 07:13 PM
That assumes one is still able to run these days.

I'm in the army, I can run with 70lbs of gear on, running isn't the problem, its being able to conceal it practically.

Mat, not doormat
September 16, 2013, 08:07 PM
I'm in the army, I can run with 70lbs of gear on, running isn't the problem, its being able to conceal it practically.

I'm sort of puzzled by this. If you can conceal one big revolver, a second one shouldn't actually be a problem. People are more or less symmetrical, after all. We have two eyes, two ears, two hands, and most pertinently, two sides. Find what works on the one side, and do the same on the other. Simple. In a number of ways, carrying two is actually easier. If you bulge the same on both sides, it's less noticeable than having an asymmetrical, single bulge. One of the biggest drawbacks to a heavy gun is that it drags at you unevenly. Two balances the load.

If you can't conceal two, can you really conceal one?

Sent from my C771 using Tapatalk 2

Revolver Ocelot
September 16, 2013, 10:29 PM
I'm sort of puzzled by this. If you can conceal one big revolver, a second one shouldn't actually be a problem.

Of course it is doable, I was looking for something more along the lines of what would be a good way of going about it and still be able to conceal it. I'm thinking gp100 on strong side and sp101 on crossdraw (both carried owb of course, after all if I have to wear a jacket and carry that much weight I may as well be comfortable).

elhombreconnonombre
November 27, 2013, 03:13 PM
On a dare from my cartridge using pards I have been known to go trapcing around the woods to hunt hogs with a Italian repro Walker and 10 shot Le Mat grapeshot revolver in a double cross draw shoulder holster rig.

shafter
November 27, 2013, 04:57 PM
I've carried two revolvers before but never two big ones. Usually its two snubbies in my Sig Sauer leather jacket. One in the hidden holster on each side.

If your set on carrying the GP100 your best bet would be a belt holster and a pocket gun like a J-frame.

TrueTexan
November 27, 2013, 08:59 PM
In Alaska do it simple 1 Ruger Alaskan 44 mag crossdraw 1 Super Redhawk strong side .

Master Blaster
November 27, 2013, 09:05 PM
My choices if I were to carry two:A glock 30 11 rounds of .45 acp on tap, and a 21 magazine for a reload strong side IWB. And an lcp .380 pocket with two spare magazines. If a revolver 627 pc with 8 rounds on tap and a few 8 round moon clips strong side belt holster, Backup a smith 642 pocket carry.

9mmfan
November 28, 2013, 12:55 AM
On a dare from my cartridge using pards I have been known to go trapcing around the woods to hunt hogs with a Italian repro Walker and 10 shot Le Mat grapeshot revolver in a double cross draw shoulder holster rig.


Awesome.

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