Best Tomahawk?


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Tired_and_hungry
August 28, 2013, 10:25 AM
Among y'all who own tomahawks, which amongst these would be the best?

http://www.sogknives.com/tactical/gear/tactical-tomahawk-satin.html

http://www.crkt.com/Kangee-Tactical-Tomahawk

http://www.unitedcutlery.com/ProductDetail.aspx?itemno=UC2765&cat=M4
(United cutlery M48 tomahawk)

http://www.coldsteel.com/Product/90VT/VIETNAM_TOMAHAWK.aspx

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Sam1911
August 28, 2013, 10:34 AM
For what, exactly? I mean, what will its role be?

hso
August 28, 2013, 10:47 AM
Looks like you're interesed in a "tactical" hawk, it that correct? Any reason why?

If you're not actually deploying to some place you need to break into things, get the coolest looking and cheapest that you can find or the one that costs the most for "bragging rights" or the one that is out of stock so you can save your money and tell your pals they quit making "the best" and you weren't willing to compromise.

The whole "tactical" tomahawk phase is about over and it can't happen soon enough.

JShirley
August 28, 2013, 12:42 PM
None of the above.

Get a CS Rifleman's Hawk, and call it good. (Don't order from CS, though- they're cheaper elsewhere.)

John

handyman163
August 28, 2013, 02:34 PM
I like my CS Pipe Hawk the best, but I also have a trailhawk. The Trail hawk is lighter, but has a much smaller cutting area than the pipe hawk. I like the pipe hawk because of the hammer on the back similar to the rifleman's hawk, but the pipe hawk is lighter then the rifleman.

I stripped the black finish and cold blued the hawk head, and then stained the haft darker and made a leather sheath/cover for it.

Tirod
August 28, 2013, 06:57 PM
To HSO's regret, the tactical tomahawk hasn't left the scene yet, and there are more on the way every year. The market seems to be increasing as more of our soldiers come home, and LEO is made more aware of what it can do on duty.

But the question remains - what does the OP plan? The tool is selected for what it does in meeting the needs of the tasks - not vice versa, which is how most juvenile males buy things. They see it, it looks awesomely wicked and cool, has some aura of power or evil to it, and cash trades hands.

On the mature side of street, the adult male assesses his needs, then selects what features provide utility for tasks that satisfy the needs. What a tactical hawk can do is be light - which means you can carry it daily, but it trades off being a big chopper capable of taking down trees easily. A tac hawk has a spike, which can be used piercing, but it won't hammer, and you have to pay attention on the back stroke, just the same as hammering with the butt of a knife. The tac hawk has a fixed handle, which means it weighs more than one with a wooden handle, but it likely will never break. It also allows the tool to be used as a rolling pry bar with the spike, something a polled wood handle hawk won't do. The handle slipped thru the head protrudes and interferes.

It's unfortunate this pattern has been labeled "tactical," when in fact it just the venerable spike hawk of yore. If you consider it a handy, light, pioneering tool when backpacking a trail in wilderness, then a lot of useful things can be done with it to make a camp more comfortable.

If it's just another zombie slaying play toy, well, I agree. There's been too much of that. After Vietnam wound down the survival knife craze started up. Now that our time in SW Asia is winding down, I suspect the tac hawk might be the next long term craze for impulsive boys needed a testosterone fix. That doesn't mean that a good field knife wasn't needing, and it doesn't mean someone can't use a spike hawk effectively to fashion themselves a comfortable existence. But, it does mean some will hype the tool to an impulsive market who is looking for a badge of courage.

Well, you can't buy that, although some try at the PX.

PS, there is no "best" - that is a huge clue to it not being a tool selected to do a job, but a badge. The four hawks are entirely different with a range of features that do different things. The list of what needs to be done isn't real clear.

308win
August 28, 2013, 07:26 PM
I got a SOG because I wanted it; that is all the justification I need.

ETA: I didn't pay $65 for it;

VA27
August 28, 2013, 08:26 PM
I like the crk&t hawk, but what I have is a cs trail hawk...and a 2hawks woodsman.

.338-06
August 28, 2013, 08:34 PM
Like others have said, hawks are tools and you use different tools for different things. I really wish there were more hawks with hammer than spike. That said, I do own both and have found the spike very useful for chipping ice.:p

19-3Ben
August 29, 2013, 07:10 AM
If I were really hellbent on getting a tomahawk, it would probably be one of them from Estwing. They seem to be getting great reviews. For the price range, it seems it's the only American made option, and it's a great old company with a great reputation and customer service to match.

#1 (http://www.amazon.com/Estwing-EBDBA-38-Ounce-Double-Black/dp/B00AYLK3Z2/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1377774363&sr=8-2&keywords=estwing+tomahawk)
#2 (http://www.amazon.com/Estwing-EBTA-27-Ounce-Tomahawk-Black/dp/B00AYLJE8E/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1377774363&sr=8-1&keywords=estwing+tomahawk)

I actually own the Estwing Sportsman's axe (http://www.amazon.com/Estwing-E24A-Sportsmans-Hatchet-Handle/dp/B0002JT0BO/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1377774456&sr=8-1&keywords=estwing+sportsman+axe), which at $27 is the most bang for your buck I can possibly imagine in a hatchet. It actually works well as a hatchet, and if you're looking for a "weapon," I would not want to be on the mean end of this thing. Just a little edge sharpening, and it's really one heck of a tool/weapon to be reckoned with.
I use it around my yard all the time and I'm consistently impressed with just how deeply it can bite into wood, and just how thick of a piece it can actually chop through in a single swing.

MICHAEL T
August 29, 2013, 12:16 PM
I just get a good bowie Knife and for get the hawk.

il_10
August 29, 2013, 04:19 PM
I've got an RMJ tactical Shrike (it was a gift). I have to say I've found the thing really handy for camping and hunting. It's been fantastic for butchering deer, spike-to-thigh-joint and it pops right off, and the beard is a decent skinner along the spine. Still, it's more quick and easy than right.
It's also pretty good for small kindling stuff for firebuilding, and putting holes in a fire barrel. A hatchet would be better for the kindling, though heavier to have around. I haven't found a better tool for putting holes in sheet steel yet, though.
Would I have bought one? I don't know, but I doubt it. Have I found it nice to have around? Absolutely.
So, consider what you need it for. The SOG has the smallest chopping profile and a strange edge angle from the handle. The CRKT would probably be the best of the bunch for putting holes in sheet metal and the like due to the edge geometry (the m48 spike looks as if it would dull quickly with a 4-way grind), but the m48 is the only one with a sharpened beard, which is pretty useful for large game. For what I use mine for? I'd go with the CRKT, or get the m48 and regrind the spike to match the CRKT or RMJ style.
YMMV.

Tirod
August 30, 2013, 10:29 AM
Hawks definitely have a place outdoors, our ancestors both immigrant, or aboriginal chose them over huge knives - which by the 1840's were common in trade as Sheffield was churning out "Bowie" knives in response to the huge fad they became then. Most Bowies up to the Civil War were imports, same as the survival knife craze twenty years ago, same as the tomahawk today.

Is Estwing the best? Arguable, I get just as good service out of a cheap boy's axe I picked from wallyworld 25 years ago, and it's harder, too. I prefer it chopping roots or lathe and plaster, my Estwing is softer and gets chipped a lot more easily, I only use it on wood. Maybe that's luck of the draw, or the way it's hardened after casting.

I'd like to see a comparison of "camp knife" to tomahawk setting up and doing chores in a primitive site. I've done enough of it for the Army, and had to with nothing more than a 4" folder. When we had an entrenching tool setting up got a lot easier, although with the load of gear they weren't much welcome.

I know a lot of folks are sold on beating on a large knife to split wood, but in a survival situation, I'd rather use a tool made to split wood, grub rocks and roots, and use less of my energy doing it. I see that as why our forefathers carried small 4" knives for dressing game and food prep, and a hawk for the bigger camp chores. And that goes back into Europe, too, where they were common everyday tools for the majority of villagers living off the land in a cut over world. They used hatchets and hawks, not big blades that were usually the provenance of nobility. Couldn't afford them.

The bias against hawks is exactly that - big blades are a bigger testosterone boost in the culture of modern young males.

Sam Cade
August 30, 2013, 10:34 PM
They used hatchets and hawks, not big blades that were usually the provenance of nobility. Couldn't afford them.


No.

Saex?

Fascine knife/Billhook?


Maybe that's luck of the draw, or the way it's hardened after casting.

Estwings are forged, not cast and they are batch HTed via salt bath and oven.

Tirod
August 31, 2013, 09:05 AM
And those were common trade items? No so much. Reading the list of imports that the Hudson Bay company brought in, those were speciality tools for specific individuals. Same for the Lewis and Clark expedition, plenty of trade knives 4 and 6", not decorative specialty Bowies with all the macho engraving. Haven't seen one yet with "The Red Man's Friend" on it.

What they got was most often was what we would now consider a cheap Ecko butcher knife. They were mostly thin flexible steel, not 3/16 or 1/4 baton masters. Which, they never did anyway. They used the typical British Navy boarding axe, which was imported because it was cheap and effective. Better than nothing at all. Slip handle, no hammer or poll. Later version had spikes and hammer polls as those became more common, and photographers got some in pictures.

Before that, it was a flint knife and a war club, usually made from the root ball of an appropriate sized sapling.

Venture into the true historical records with the Lewis and Clark expedition, original research being done by mountain man enthusiasts who find records of actual pioneers, and things are a bit different than the pulp fiction regurgitated in what is now called textbooks.

Ohen Cepel
August 31, 2013, 09:10 AM
I had an American Tomahawk which I took to OEF, sold it when I got back, just wasn't my thing.

I prefer to be able to change a handle out if needed, or to have a short and long one if I like. So, I tend to stick with the Cold Steel line. Everyone has their preference there, I like the Trailhawk the best myself.

Eastwing also makes one now. Lots of people getting into the tac line now.

Sam Cade
August 31, 2013, 01:34 PM
And those were common trade items? No so much. Reading the list of imports that the Hudson Bay company brought in, those were speciality tools for specific individuals.

Make up your mind about what you are talking about.

Your statement was:


They (meaning our ancestors) used hatchets and hawks, not big blades that were usually the provenance of nobility. Couldn't afford them. .
:rolleyes:
This is factually incorrect since the large chopping knife (by any name) is one of the most basic and universal agricultural tools.

Tirod
August 31, 2013, 09:36 PM
A large chopping knife in tropical regions, yes. In Europe, once the fields were cleared, they used sickles and scythes. Not long straight blades - those were considered at best short swords and reserved for nobility.

I don't think we are disagreeing on the fact that agricultural workers use blades, more the interpretation of their working shape. Since Europe was much more a feudal or fief culture with an elite heirarchy, the design of their edged tools was quickly governed by their status in life. Peons working the land didn't carry long blade for crops, if anything, the temperate climate meant they had much less need for them than those working in more tropical climes. The difference is that in temperate zones, you have vegetation that must withstand the extremes of subfreezing temperatures in winter, or comparatively harsh dry summers. The plants that survive and thrive on that are much more woody and fibrous. You wind up have more heavy stems, stick, and trees, not plants that much constantly be cut back regularly to prevent their invasion.

Hawks, hatchets, and axes are more prevalent in temperate zones, long blades - machetes, parangs, bolos, kukris common in tropical areas. That is why the American Indian adopted the hawk to a larger degree than a 30" long blade. It was a temperate clime export to a temperate clime indigeneous people. The Europeans didn't ship over swords, they considered them war blades. They sent axes, hawks, and trade knives up to 8" - 10"

You don't find depictions of farm workers in Europe or American Indians with long machete like blades. Those are tropical use blades largely restricted to central America, Africa, SE Asia or the Pacific Rim. They have become highly popular in modern American culture, but it's only been recently as we attempt to push back against our largely urbanized existence. What really happened in America's more primitive time is accurately documented in writings and pictures - the tomahawk is much more prevalent.

ColtPythonElite
August 31, 2013, 09:51 PM
I got a rubber tomahawk at some roadside tourist trap on an Indian reservation when I was a kid. It had a bamboo handle and was adorned with dyed chicken feathers. It sure was something else.

MikeJackmin
August 31, 2013, 10:01 PM
I'll just chime in to mention that hawks with spikes on them can be kind of dangerous when you're chopping things. That point can come back awfully close to your face.

Sam Cade
August 31, 2013, 10:12 PM
A large chopping knife in tropical regions, yes. In Europe, once the fields were cleared, they used sickles and scythes.

Billhook. Common throughout Europe, existing in hundreds of local variations.

http://billhooks.co.uk/
http://www.timelesstools.co.uk/billhooks3.htm

I rather like Kellem sourced finnish billhooks.

The Martindales are good "starter" billhooks I think.
http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=186426&stc=1&d=1374091875
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billhook
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/1b/Devon_Billhook.jpg/800px-Devon_Billhook.jpg


The Scandinavian Sami Knife/Leuku is essentially a shortish machete.
http://www.kainuunpuukko.com/documents/pictures/xl_p_080107140751.jpg


ad infinitum ad nauseam


Not long straight blades - those were considered at best short swords and reserved for nobility.

...cite your sources. ;)

Tirod
September 1, 2013, 10:25 AM
We'll agree to disagree. Getting into a monkey dance over who can look up the best online sources leaves out things that can't be. Life was documented in books and illustrations long before the internet.

Thanks for the pics, tho, they accurately make my point - those aren't machetes. It's getting off topic, too.

The OP asked about hawks, and answered.

Sam Cade
September 1, 2013, 11:02 AM
Life was documented in books and illustrations long before the internet.

Indeed.
http://billhooks.co.uk/s/img/emotionheader.jpg?1325261944.250px.235px



they accurately make my point - those aren't machetes.

What do machetes specifically have to do with anything? We where discussing the near ubiquitous presence of the large chopping knife in European and continental agriculture.

Seventhsword
September 1, 2013, 11:17 AM
Here's one of mine...

http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3018/3032461010_86bcf5ab37_o.jpg

4v50 Gary
September 1, 2013, 11:46 AM
I prefer a small one (head no bigger than my hand). Less weight to carry and I was still able to chop down a pine tree (about 5" thick) with one. Instead of whack, whack, whack as you would with a hatchet, it was tap, tap, tap with blows delivered from elbow swings. after an hour, I had the tree down to less than 1". I walked away for safety reasons and the wind blew it over.

The frontiersmen also carried small hand hatchets. Go to the TN State Museum if you want to see one.

mdauben
September 1, 2013, 01:42 PM
A tac hawk has a spike, which can be used piercing, but it won't hammer, and you have to pay attention on the back stroke, just the same as hammering with the butt of a knife.
Most "tactical hawks" are spiked, but I know at least CRKT makes their's in both a spiked and hammer pol version (see below)

The CRKT would probably be the best of the bunch for putting holes in sheet metal and the like due to the edge geometry (the m48 spike looks as if it would dull quickly with a 4-way grind), but the m48 is the only one with a sharpened beard, which is pretty useful for large game.
Actually, it you look closely the CRKT has both a sharpened beard and a sharpened top edge, too. If I had an actual need for a "tactical hawk" I would look seriously at the CRKT Kangee or Chogan .

http://www.cutleryshoppe.com/images/products/detail/crkt_2720.jpg

So as not to sound like a total CRKT fanboy, I'll say that for a general purpose outdoor tool, I would pick a Cold Steel Trail Hawk (which is currently hanging from my daypack, actually). It's relatively light, inexpensive and durable. Its not my first choice for major wood processing, but for occasional light chopping and splitting it works fine once you put a good edge on it.

Officers'Wife
September 1, 2013, 02:44 PM
A large chopping knife in tropical regions, yes. In Europe, once the fields were cleared, they used sickles and scythes. Not long straight blades - those were considered at best short swords and reserved for nobility.

I don't think we are disagreeing on the fact that agricultural workers use blades, more the interpretation of their working shape. Since Europe was much more a feudal or fief culture with an elite heirarchy, the design of their edged tools was quickly governed by their status in life. Peons working the land didn't carry long blade for crops, if anything, the temperate climate meant they had much less need for them than those working in more tropical climes. The difference is that in temperate zones, you have vegetation that must withstand the extremes of subfreezing temperatures in winter, or comparatively harsh dry summers. The plants that survive and thrive on that are much more woody and fibrous. You wind up have more heavy stems, stick, and trees, not plants that much constantly be cut back regularly to prevent their invasion.

Hawks, hatchets, and axes are more prevalent in temperate zones, long blades - machetes, parangs, bolos, kukris common in tropical areas. That is why the American Indian adopted the hawk to a larger degree than a 30" long blade. It was a temperate clime export to a temperate clime indigeneous people. The Europeans didn't ship over swords, they considered them war blades. They sent axes, hawks, and trade knives up to 8" - 10"

You don't find depictions of farm workers in Europe or American Indians with long machete like blades. Those are tropical use blades largely restricted to central America, Africa, SE Asia or the Pacific Rim. They have become highly popular in modern American culture, but it's only been recently as we attempt to push back against our largely urbanized existence. What really happened in America's more primitive time is accurately documented in writings and pictures - the tomahawk is much more prevalent.
Hi Tirod,

The "corn knife" has been around roughly forever and still available if you have a need for one enough to look. I use one to cut willow saplings off the Iroquois river when I need to re-cane the antique kitchen chairs.

Corn Knife (http://www.sears.com/truper-corn-knife/p-07139648000P?sid=IDx01192011x000001&kpid=07139648000&kispla=07139648000P)

USAF_Vet
September 1, 2013, 08:40 PM
I've got a SOG tactical tomahawk (black) and a Cold Steel Norse hawk. I prefer the Norse hawk.

The 'Viet Nam' hawks with the spikes like the SOG don't suit my needs for a nice hand axe. The Norse hawk blade is nice and wide. Just my $0.02

Tirod
September 2, 2013, 10:09 AM
Among y'all who own tomahawks, which amongst these would be the best?

http://www.sogknives.com/tactical/ge...awk-satin.html

http://www.crkt.com/Kangee-Tactical-Tomahawk

http://www.unitedcutlery.com/Product...=UC2765&cat=M4
(United cutlery M48 tomahawk)

http://www.coldsteel.com/Product/90V..._TOMAHAWK.aspx

The SOG and Cold Steel definitely are popular, the Kangee is fairly new and definitely more expensive. The UC is an inexpensive offshore product, the usual caution there is advised - you get what you pay for.

However, the OP hasn't responded to the question of how it will be used. If I got the thread off track, my bad. Knowing the specific intent of use is important, tho. One difficulty I have is reading too much into a question that is phrased, "What's the best?" It implies we all accept the exact same standards to measure the tool by. In reality, there are numerous contradictory standards and no one tool can do it all. Compromises have to be introduced, there is no winner take all.

The angle of the edge, the weight of the tool, the handle length, method of securing the head to the handle, what other feature might be on the other side and it's emphasis, what kind of grip, it's texture, and even it's circumference all make differences that add up, tilting the usefulness of each product toward one side or the other. It's entirely why we have different tools - saying "which hammer is the best?" means comparing a framing hammer vs cabinet makers vs ball peen vs hand sledge. They all hammer, none does much good outside it's specific intent.

Without knowing the specific tasks the tool is being used for, we can't say which might be better for the job. I think that is one thing most of us can agree on - there is rarely a tool that is "best," but there are tools that are better for doing certain things, and if the OP is being sincere, then those tasks need to be specified in detail.

JShirley
September 2, 2013, 10:20 AM
OfficersWife,

That's very interesting. I found this ( http://www.tractorsupply.com/product__10151_-1_10051_15783) when I searched.

Sam Cade
September 2, 2013, 11:40 AM
OfficersWife,

That's very interesting. I found this ( http://www.tractorsupply.com/product__10151_-1_10051_15783) when I searched.

That is what this started out life as:
http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=188464&stc=1&d=1378135731


It is my 7 year olds and he didn't want the grip perfectly finished. He is funny about stuff sometimes.
Note how he engraved an eye for accuracy and teeth for sharpness. :D



Locally tobacco cutters are about a 50/50 split between big honkin' knives of various types with a strong preference for a squared tip and the task specific long handled tobacco knife.
http://media.kentucky.com/smedia/2012/08/22/14/08/1452Bt.AuSt.79.jpeg

JShirley
September 2, 2013, 11:49 AM
That used to be a corn sickle?

Sam Cade
September 2, 2013, 12:02 PM
Hah!
:banghead:
That is funny! TSC might be having a page issue.

It was one of these sold as "corn knife".
http://www.tractorsupply.com/en/store/groundworkreg%3B-chop-saw-with-wooden-handle-21-1-2-in-l


"Corn knife" is usually the descriptor given to a machete with an (often broad) square tip.

Like so:
http://www.plumbersurplus.com/images/prod/6/Bond-6218-rw-168776-241996.jpg

http://www.southernstates.com/catalog/images/Product/large/10500657.jpg

http://ep.yimg.com/ca/I/yhst-29358752693524_2271_14331870

Sam Cade
September 2, 2013, 12:18 PM
On a related note, I've got a couple of those TSC eastern pattern sickles. Sold has "Hand sickle" IIRC.
Thoroughly decent tools.

With 18" machete for scale:
http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=188467&stc=1&d=1378138665

1/8" thick SK-5.
http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=188468&stc=1&d=1378138665

Officers'Wife
September 2, 2013, 01:24 PM
Redacted

Deltaboy
September 7, 2013, 09:42 PM
Nice blades. I want to get a CS rifleman hawk.

JShirley
September 8, 2013, 08:47 AM
If that's a $12 SK-5 sickle, that seems like a great price.

Sam Cade
September 8, 2013, 10:56 AM
If that's a $12 SK-5 sickle, that seems like a great price.

It seems to be an excellent tool. The grind is asymmetrical. 3/4 height shallow scandi on the side not shown in the above pic.


Sometimes I get the urge to knock the tubular handle off of one of the ones I have and make the mother of all ringless kerambits.:evil:

Pete D.
September 11, 2013, 05:58 AM
I have about eight or so tomahawks. The only one with a hammer poll is the Trail Hawk, nice for woods cruising. The others are all used for throwing and are smaller and lighter. The largest of that bunch is a Cold Steel Frontier Hawk. It is a good thrower though I found the handle a bit too long and cut it back to 20 inches....may bob it a bit more yet. It is the heaviest of the bunch, most of which come from Track of the Wolf and are specifically for throwing.
I did remove the little set screw from the Frontier hawk and refitted the handle. Having a screw kinda defeats the purpose of the "cone/friction fit" common in throwing hawks. You want the handle to pop out if it hits badly.
Curious about the earlier Estwing comments....does Estwing make a tomahawk?
Pete

Sam Cade
September 11, 2013, 08:08 AM
....does Estwing make a tomahawk?


In the original sense of "tomahawk" meaning a light hand axe, the answer is of course yes.

If your query is, "Does Estwing make a light hand axe with a spike opposite the blade?" the answer is also yes.

http://www.estwing.com/img/products/ao_tomahawk.jpg

JShirley
September 11, 2013, 09:14 AM
Okay, tomahawk originally meant war club. It had become synonymous with "hatchet" by the American Revolution.

John

Sam Cade
September 11, 2013, 09:41 AM
In any case, it is a worth with interesting etymology.


tomahawk (n.)
1610s, tamahaac, from Algonquian (probably Powhatan) tamahack "what is used in cutting," from tamaham "he cuts." Cognate with Mohegan tummahegan, Delaware tamoihecan, Micmac tumeegun.

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_frame=0&search=tomahawk&searchmode=none

From an Algonquian (most likely Powhatan) word. Compare Malecite-Passamaquoddy tomhikon (“ax”), Abenaki temahigan, demahigan (“ax”).
Noun
http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/tomahawk


Edit: and a quick article from JSTOR on the origin of the term and its usage:

http://www.jstor.org/stable/659577

JShirley
September 11, 2013, 09:59 AM
I don't feel like re-doing my own research, done for the review of Troy's hawk (http://www.shootingreviews.com/tomahawks-hard-use-tools-and-weapons-or-tactical-toys/).

But here's my footnote: Conlin Taylor, Native American Weapons, (London: University of Oklahoma Press, 2001), 16-30.

John

Critical J
September 13, 2013, 02:20 PM
Well, here's mine. it's lasted this long, that's all I can really say but it did help us chop our way out of a micro downburst that struck our campsite in FL, once upon a time. It is nice to have one when the need arises, that's for sure...

scallop
September 21, 2013, 12:01 PM
Here is mine. Not into the "tacticool" thing. It is a shrew hawk, a bit smaller than most but very light and handy. Very sharp and the hammer poll is handy to have around camp and in the woods. I have added a paracord wrap to the bottom 1/3 of the handle for better grip and comfort, no pics of that though.

Specs and info here.
http://shrewbows.com/shrewhawk/

http://i427.photobucket.com/albums/pp356/stevemdii/IMG_5295.jpg

http://i427.photobucket.com/albums/pp356/stevemdii/IMG_5294.jpg

http://i427.photobucket.com/albums/pp356/stevemdii/IMG_5293.jpg

RyanM
September 22, 2013, 05:57 AM
Okay, tomahawk originally meant war club. It had become synonymous with "hatchet" by the American Revolution.

Didn't a lot of styles of war "club" have stone blades on them?

JShirley
September 22, 2013, 09:51 AM
Yes. After enough hatchets became available, the old war clubs became increasingly rare.

Mainsail
September 23, 2013, 03:56 PM
http://www.snowpeak.com/media/upload/image/N-033_M1.JPG
http://www.snowpeak.com/media/upload/image/N-033_M2.JPG
http://www.snowpeak.com/media/upload/image/N-033_M3.JPG
http://www.snowpeak.com/media/upload/image/N-033_M4.JPG
http://www.snowpeak.com/media/upload/image/N-033_M5.JPG
http://www.snowpeak.com/media/upload/image/N-033_M6.JPG
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http://www.snowpeak.com/media/upload/image/N-033_M9.JPG

Makes:
http://www.snowpeak.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/950x430/5e06319eda06f020e43594a9c230972d/s/m/small-axe_1.jpg

Also available:
http://www.snowpeak.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/950x430/5e06319eda06f020e43594a9c230972d/h/a/hatchet_1.jpg

http://www.snowpeak.com/tablew...ts/japanese-axe.html (http://www.snowpeak.com/tableware/axes-hatchets/japanese-axe.html)

deputy tom
September 28, 2013, 05:05 PM
I want a CS Trail hawk. For now I'll settle on a SOG Fast hawk. tom. :cool:

shafter
September 28, 2013, 08:24 PM
I don't have much use for a hawk with a spike on it, in fact I've never found much use for one at all. If I was to get one it wouldn't have a spike on the end to gouge a hole in my skull. I won't be fighting with one, thats for sure.

Tirod
September 30, 2013, 11:26 AM
Very few gouge a hole in their skull with a framing hammer or pickaxe. Goes to being familiar with the tool by using it carefully until experience has conditioned you to not do the wrong thing.

I would expect anyone used to hammering nails to have insight into how to hold the nail on the first strike to know that, but it's not common knowledge much in a world of no father at home and cordless drill drivers. In my day, my father even taught me how to hammer a bent nail straight for reuse. Most just throw them on the floor and sweep them up now.

Spike hawks have a place - in primitive conditions where you are more likely to carry in your tools on your person. Not drive in with a tool box in the back of the truck. And their purpose isn't so much to build, as in stick frame construction. That's why you rarely see spike hawks in hardware stores - they sell building tools there, not deconstruction tools used in Fire, LEO, or military use. They have a few, tho, for tearing things apart, and the one trait they share is a spike, not a hammer.

There are very few these days who spend a few weeks in the woods living entirely with the things they carry - I wouldn't base my tool decisions off what a hardware store sells construction workers. Preferably, those who have used tools in the past in primitive conditions would be the historic legacy, and those who do so today in primitive conditions would update that. Like language, what we used to use in yesteryear has changed, just the same as what we define a word to mean.

Then, a rifle was a wood and steel flintlock fired muzzleloader, now it includes semi automatic forged aluminum and composite magazine fed versions. Todays tomahawk includes both the old, and new, but it doesn't make the new ones less versatile. The users skill level and experience is the only thing that can do that.

If all you know is the old tools, you can't use the new ones to their fullest extent. It's the same with those who use the modern tomahawk - they aren't limited in how they use them, they are too busy opening up third world construction, searching cars, prying into crates, boxes, electrical panels, or digging up things in full tactical gear to worry about who's sense of what is "correct" might be offended.

Spike hawks are here to stay, reborn for modern use. You can either take advantage of them or not, but piling on objections against them is really no different than saying the self loading cartridge rifle is "too dangerous." Which is why even Lincoln's general's wouldn't adopt the lever action rifle - too staid and self righteous to learn better.

Ironic how that is coming from posters using the internet and even smart phones to do so. Y'all didn't think typing a letter to the admin would get the job done, right? Why cling to outmoded definitions and a lack of understanding to justify an opinion? Browning, Garand, Stoner, and Kalashnikov didn't. We celebrate their advanced designs (all of which are now dated,) but we won't accept the new uses of the tomahawk which predates all of their weapons by hundreds of years?

It's America, you can disagree to your heart's content. I'll be happy knowing that just like after the Vietnam War, there was a new appreciation for what that newfangled design Army rifle could really do - which is now the dominant category of largest growth in firearms, the AR15. Same for the tomahawk - used in our latest excursion by troops who knew how, now a rapidly rising tool of choice as they transition into Law Enforcement and Rescue.

Nothing wrong with tradition, but consider the definition of what it is, the revering of old methods in deference to what they used to mean. Not necessarily what we need to get the job done today.

Who's got a rotary dial app for their smart phone?

Critical J
October 10, 2013, 10:03 PM
The spike is for busting things open while saving your blade, from concrete to window panes, but I mostly employ it in climbing steep embankments (or, ya know, what he ^ said)

Did you also know that the whistler holes in the blade are for pulling free your hawk from the head thereby saving your screw connections, instead of prying it loose?

Mr. T
October 16, 2013, 02:00 AM
I got the SOG Fast Hawk and I use it for trimming saplings for shooting lanes for our deer blinds. It works pretty good, but it doesn't replace a good hatchet. I've got a couple of Gerbers for hatchets and they work much better on larger sized trees 6" to 8" in size. I was so impressed with their hatchets that I bought a couple of their camp axes too. The hatchets were probably the most versatile though...if you had to use one for self defense I would have to say that they would be devastating.

Critical J
October 17, 2013, 12:48 AM
@ Mr. T
the FastHawk is meant to be their combat model, you want the full sized Tomahawk, which tackles all manner of camp chores, etc.

What any good 'hawk needs is a sidekick. Example, SOG's full sized Tomahawk is an updated version of the old military V-Tac, so the perfect counter sidekick is naturally your classic military K-Bar, once you wrap the 'hawk shaft in leather. Alternatively, if you go for the slick, little polished-up FastHawk, then the Buck Special is gonna match perfectly!

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