Selling the 1911 and going Tupperware?


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burk
September 4, 2013, 07:40 PM
Thinking about the article in modern service weapons about the 1911 platform (and our 1911 romantics thread) and my last trip to the range. No matter how I confront it my Glock 19 is as good a shooter as my Kimber CDP Pro. And while thinking about buying another 1911 w/rail for home protection (I prefer .45) I was just offered ( I have it on hold) a Glock Gen3 21 for $349 which is a deal that is probably too good to refuse. While the Glock isn't near as pretty it will hold 5 more rounds of ammo, it's easier to maintain and won't cost me 400 rounds of ball ammo to break in.

Now I'm considering selling the Kimber CDP Pro, with holster I ought to be able to get a grand for it easy. I carry a lot in the backcountry on Fly fishing trips where the Kimber could and does get wet. The carbon steel bbl doesn't like this. It requires much more tender care and the idea of a Glock 30SF is sounding very appealing. Plus it will take the mags from my 21 in a pinch. I haven't decided yet, but while the 1911 is pretty and shoots great the tupperware is damn practical. And having one platform for all my main guns makes since, what think yee?

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PakWaan
September 4, 2013, 07:45 PM
Keep them both. You will regret not having a 1911 in the stable, and will wind up buying another one eventually....

Tolkachi Robotnik
September 4, 2013, 07:47 PM
You'll never regret getting rid of something if you keep them all...

RmB
September 4, 2013, 07:48 PM
+1 to the above two posts

LeonCarr
September 4, 2013, 07:51 PM
I switched from 1911 to Glock in 2000 and have never looked back.

Just my .02,
LeonCarr

CountGlockulla
September 4, 2013, 07:56 PM
Most people are better off not carrying a 1911. They require maintenance and an above average willingness to be your own gunsmith of sorts if you use them more than an occasional range toy.

For your use I would get a G30 an roll on. Mine is just as accurate and softer shooting than the several Pro model Kimbers I have had.

Roadking Rider
September 4, 2013, 07:58 PM
I let my 1911 go a few years back after falling in love with the Tupperware pistols for the same reason you speak of. After a couple of years of owning a few Tupperware pistols the 1911 bug bit, again and again till I finally had to buy one that lead me to other steel/steel allow pistols. Then about a month ago I ran across a very slightly used Ruger SR1911 that I just had to have. So now I have two. So I guess what I'm trying to say is just because you like Tupperware pistols today does not mean the love for 1911's ever leave your system. I would recommend that you keep your 1911 and save for Tupperware.

readyeddy
September 4, 2013, 08:02 PM
If you can't afford to own both, then the Glock is a no-brainer if your gun is primarily a tool.

VoodooSan
September 4, 2013, 09:13 PM
yea I agree if you can only have one I would pick the G21. And thats a good price too. I would snag that. And I am a 1911 fan. I have shot and carried quite a few. But if its my primary and I have a Glock 21 and a 1911 I will most likely grab the Glock. I have a 3rd gen G30SF and I have to say I love that gun. And if you can keep both I would.

burk
September 4, 2013, 09:21 PM
If you can't afford to own both, then the Glock is a no-brainer if your gun is primarily a tool.
This. Money is an issue, I can sell the Pro CDP, and buy both the 21 and a 30SF and maybe even have some cash left over. Funds are really tight right now. If I could afford both I'd love to have a couple of 1911's around, but the reality is as tools the Glocks make more sense.

VetPsychWars
September 4, 2013, 10:33 PM
Most people are better off not carrying a 1911. They require maintenance and an above average willingness to be your own gunsmith of sorts if you use them more than an occasional range toy.


Wow. Um, no. Millions of soldiers used them. All you have to do is keep it cleaned and lubricated. Learning to take it completely apart is simple with military manuals. You'll need to change a spring now and again. Cheap and easy.

Yeah it has a few more parts than some other guns. Takes a little more effort to learn. Once you learn it you never forget it.

I carry a full-size 1911 and I will until I'm in the ground. People screw around with a 1911 because they can, not because they need to.

If you can't handle some simple maintenance, then I guess a Glock is for you. Carry what makes you happy... as long as you carry it and practice with it.

Tom

Kayaker 1960
September 4, 2013, 11:16 PM
I've had a Glock Model 22 for many years. I read how wonderful 1911's are and on impulse bought a new Colt Commander in .45 a few years back. It was pretty, it felt good in my hand, it was ever so slightly more accurate than my Glock, it stayed in the safe. IMHO as a tool, the Glock is a better gun. I sold the Colt about a year ago after putting about 500 rounds through it. I hope the buyer really likes it. It just wasn't for me.

tommy.duncan
September 4, 2013, 11:17 PM
WOW!! A lot of good points. A great price on the Gen3 g21, but, I love my 1911. I have a Gen3 g20 that I love. My safe will never be without a 1911, 4 currently reside in my safe.

allaroundhunter
September 4, 2013, 11:26 PM
Most people are better off not carrying a 1911. They require maintenance and an above average willingness to be your own gunsmith of sorts if you use them more than an occasional range toy.


This right here is funny :rolleyes:

huntsman
September 4, 2013, 11:35 PM
I haven't decided yet, but while the 1911 is pretty and shoots great the tupperware is damn practical. And having one platform for all my main guns makes since, what think yee?

sounds like logically the Glocks win and emotionally the 1911 wins, so what are you emotional or logical? Can't afford to own a safe queen? seems to me logical wins.

X-Rap
September 4, 2013, 11:40 PM
I have 1/2 dozen 1911's that are looking for new homes. I'm keeping a couple favorites.
One can only guess how the gun world would look if JMB had injection molding but I think he would be pleased.

CountGlockulla
September 5, 2013, 12:14 AM
Well lets see who else agrees with my assessment of whethe a 1911 is not for everyone

Larry Vickers

7. How do I know if a 1911 is the right choice for me?

That is a tough question as I feel most people are best served NOT using a 1911 as a primary sidearm. Two criteria come to mind a) A passion for the 1911 platform and b) you are willing to be your own armorer and can fix relatively minor problems or fit certain parts yourself. If you are the kind of guy that doesn’t mind tinkering with your Harley Davidson motorcycle to keep it running then you are a candidate. If however you treat your pistols like we all treat our lawnmowers then don’t get a 1911 – use a Glock.


http://vickerstactical.com/tactical-tips/faqs-with-larry-vickers/

Or maybe Hilton Yam:

A modern production 1911 typically needs a little gunsmith attention at some point in its life. It is not the same as the gun that was carefully handcrafted at the Colt factory nearly a century ago. When Colt first started producing the gun way back in the day, they were the only ones making it - their parts, their mags, ammo to their spec. The design has been around for so long that any particular 1911 is now made with parts made to various specs that have wandered away from the original for one reason or another, and is fed with ammo and mags that have similarly changed or evolved. This is the reason why the 1911 does well with tuning by a skilled hand, something that it often does not receive at the modern factory. The gun also needs proper cleaning and maintenance to reach its full potential.

http://www.10-8performance.com/pages/1911-User's-Guide.html

Or go read this proffesionals experience with extensively training with and carrying various polymer guns and a custom 1911

http://pistol-training.com/

Or I could keep going but won't.

How about those who disagree show tell how many rounds they have fired in training with and carrying a 1911 in the last 3 years. I'm right at 23000 and was shooting over 1K per month until life obligations took over and so did my Glock use. I've owned and carried models that cost anywhere from $500 to $3200 dollars. Not saying this to brag, but to make the point that I like the platform and was committed to it. You should see my spare parts and springs bin especially during its heyday.

It is a great platform and fun to shoot but if you run the gun hard and use it for anything more than a range toy you will have parts breakages, need to change springs, deal with weeding out finicky magazines, and need to clean the gun more often to maintain reliability. And for all of that you only get better slow fire, bullseye accuracy after 30 yards and some nostalgia.

/endthread.exe

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Southside830
September 5, 2013, 12:50 AM
I've had 3 1911's. Sig carry nightmare, Rock Island tactical, and a Colt commander. They're all gone. I shoot my glocks better. Have a 21sf and a 30. No regrets.

tarosean
September 5, 2013, 01:12 AM
I have 5 1911's and 3 Glocks... Guess what? They live together in harmony.. I never hear any bickering about who is better coming from my safe.




Selling the 1911 and going Tupperware?


Look at the bright side... Your ammo will stay fresher longer...

OARNGESI
September 5, 2013, 03:47 AM
everyone needs one glock and one 1911

ku4hx
September 5, 2013, 04:31 AM
You'll be sorrrryyyy.....

Teachu2
September 5, 2013, 04:35 AM
This. Money is an issue, I can sell the Pro CDP, and buy both the 21 and a 30SF and maybe even have some cash left over. Funds are really tight right now. If I could afford both I'd love to have a couple of 1911's around, but the reality is as tools the Glocks make more sense.
Pretty much covers it.

I currently own three 1911s - a Les Baer SRP, a Colt Series80 stainless Govt, and a Colt Series70 Govt with a Ed Brown barrel. All three now shoot every factory round I feed them, from ball to flying ashtrays. I am fond of all three, but I don't have any of them on my carry permit.

I also own eleven Glocks, including 30, 30sf, 36, 21, and 21sf models in .45acp. All my carry guns are Glocks. Lighter weight, lower cost, generally higher capacity, and I don't really care if I scar one up.

From a strictly utilitarian point of view, the Glocks are clearly a better choice. And the 30 is a ball to shoot - it's far more accurate than it should be....

Bufford t. Justice
September 5, 2013, 09:04 AM
I love my 1911's. Grew up shooting them. Qualified with them in the Marine Corps. Do own several and have owned many others and besides the occasional recoil spring have never had a problem with any of them over many thousands of rounds. That being said, I've also owned Glocks, XD's and a boat load of others.
The only tupperware left in my house....is in the kitchen where it belongs.

Fiv3r
September 5, 2013, 09:41 AM
Well I would vote to keep them both. Having both 1911s and several plastic pistols, they both fill different purposes and I have room in my stable for both.

When I can carry a heavy pistol and don't mind lower capacity, I generally prefer the 1911 as I just shoot it better.

However, of all my pistols, my (admittedly non-high end) 1911s are the ones I have had the most issues with jamming up at the range. My Glock 36, 21, and 26 have given me nary a hiccup...EVER (generations 3, 3, and 4 respectively). As my wife and I are moving, almost all of my guns are hanging out in storage until we close on the new house. In order to save space, I only kept one gun out for HD/SD.

It's actually my FNS-40, but it would have been one of the Glocks had I stocked up on more .45 and 9mm ammo:o I just bought a brick of .40, so the FNS won out. However, I am missing my boring fugly Glocks. I'll shoot my 1911s again when I get some time, but for day to day carry, the Glock 26 is my go-to. Sure it's a little "cute", but it packs like a dream. I've considered trading it off for a 19, but I just can't seem to pull the trigger, so to speak.

Once again, if I were you and COULD keep both, I would. But if it comes down to practical carry, I just trust a Glock over a 1911. I really to qualify this with the fact that I DO NOT have the skill to tinker. I admire those that do and fully concede that a finely tuned 1911 is a thing of beauty and deadly as can be. I just have had more luck out of the box with my Glocks.

YMMV

ritepath
September 5, 2013, 10:22 AM
Keep the 1911 and grab the bargain glock.

jmr40
September 5, 2013, 10:28 AM
I read a little quote a few years on some gun forum, maybe here that is pretty accurate. "My Colts and Kimbers are the guns I show off to my friends, my Glocks are the guns I show to my enemies." If you are going to use it for personal protection then the Glock is a no brainer. If you can afford both there is nothing wrong with having both. It is just a matter of priorities. I have no problem selling guns I don't use but in my case I have both. If money were tight and I had to keep only one, the 1911's would go first.

MagnunJoe
September 5, 2013, 10:37 AM
I have 2 Glocks & 2 1911s. Glock 19 is my EDC. Glock 26 is my stay in the car in 130 degree Florida heat gun. My 1911s are my toys to shoot at the range with dirty, cheap Russian Wolf ammo but will never trust them to defend my life.
And life goes on.

Sapper771
September 5, 2013, 10:39 AM
I recommend keeping your 1911 and getting the Glock you want.

I switched from carrying 1911s to carrying Glocks. I have owned low, mid , and high end 1911's, but I only have one now and it stays in the safe. I like it and feel that as an American, I need to own at least one.

The Glocks have served me very well for the last 7 years.

burk
September 5, 2013, 11:29 AM
I do want to make one thing clear. I trust the reliability of my Kimber, it has been 100% reliable. I had some issues with the ejection pattern (an occasional face flyer) until I switched to Wolff Xpower springs. But the gun has always eaten all the factory ammo I feed it. It just requires a bit more care and attention.

I also have no problem with carrying in condition One, I've done it for years in a Milt Sparks Versa Max II and never pulled the gun out of the Holster to discover the safety engaged during carry. My only concern carrying is backcountry carry (inside a pair of waders fly-fishing). The outside of the Kimbers carbon steel barrel is already showing a little bit of pitting. And I wipe it down and lube it after every trip.

1858
September 5, 2013, 11:36 AM
"My Colts and Kimbers are the guns I show off to my friends, my Glocks are the guns I show to my enemies."

:rolleyes: I'd like to meet the 14 year old that came up with that ridiculous phrase.

I own seven 1911s but don't use any of them for CC. I much prefer a Ruger KLCR but I don't plan on showing it to my enemies.

royal barnes
September 5, 2013, 11:52 AM
I would eat more beans and tuna, save some money, keep the Kimber and buy the Glock. At that price you could sell the tupperwear and turn a nice profit. :evil:

tipoc
September 5, 2013, 01:20 PM
I don't have a dog in this fight. Folks like what they like and will buy and sell plenty of guns in their lifetimes. What a fella claims to be the best today may change in 5 years give or take. Glocks work well, though I lean to the S&W M&P in plastic.

But I noticed that earlier in this thread a fellas posted a link to this website and article...

http://pistol-training.com/

where, he said, the author explained how the 1911 isn't for everyone (I agree with that) and can be troublesome. I read this though on his test of a 1911 in 9mm at 50,000 rounds...

Durability: Another major myth of the 1911 is that the small parts break frequently and that you “need to be your own gunsmith” to survive ownership. It took 18,000 rounds to break the first part, a mainspring housing pin that wasn’t discovered until the pistol was disassembled and which never diminished the gun’s function in any way. Springfield sent out an improved pin as replacement and it’s still in perfect condition today.

The ejector broke… twice. The first time was just past 30,000 rounds and the second was at 46,000 rounds. In both cases, the gun continued to run for hundreds of rounds without any trouble. Springfield fixed it promptly both times. The cause of the breakages: the 10-round Wilson ETM magazines were striking the ejector upon insertion. This also happens with the Metalform and Tripp magazines I have, but not with the factory supplied Springfield 9-round magazines. It’s only fair to say that had I used the factory magazines, these two breakages never would have happened.

The slide stop notch began to round a bit at the 30,000 mark and Springfield touched it up when the gun was back for the ejector replacement.

Except for some holster wear on the exterior and cycling wear on the rails, the gun is pretty much good as new.

tipoc

Bobson
September 5, 2013, 03:20 PM
This. Money is an issue, I can sell the Pro CDP, and buy both the 21 and a 30SF and maybe even have some cash left over. Funds are really tight right now. If I could afford both I'd love to have a couple of 1911's around, but the reality is as tools the Glocks make more sense.
Sounds like you have a logical answer. I think if I were in your shoes, I'd like to hold on to a nice, reliable 1911, even though I've actually never owned one. Thing is, if the Glock makes more sense, go with that. I'd certainly never fault a man for choosing the logical path over the emotional one. A gun is just a tool, whether it's a beautiful 1911 or an ugly Glock. The more useful that tool is to you, the more beautiful it becomes.

jimbo555
September 5, 2013, 03:38 PM
If switching to Glocks works for you,then go for it. For me I don't care for the grip angle,thickness and lack of a positive safety. I prefer xd's version of Tupperware. But I'm keeping my 1911.

HarcyPervin
September 5, 2013, 04:47 PM
I would eat more beans and tuna, save some money, keep the Kimber and buy the Glock.

This. I'm not really a fan of Glocks, but I have and will use one when the time is right. I also try to keep my guns out of the equation when money is tight. Yes, I could sell a few and have some extra cash or I could re-evaluate other aspects in my life.

If you absolutely don't want to own more than one gun, then make the call.

burk
September 5, 2013, 05:43 PM
Well I put the 21 in layaway today. A Gen3 that looks almost brand new with 3 mags is hard to pass up for $349. I'll have to shoot it, I've always liked the SF better, but with a two hand grip it feels comfortable enough. It's a big gun, but I don't intend to conceal it. It will be my range/nightstand with a light on it gun.

I'm going to wait on the 30SF until I've shot the 21. I tried an M & P (full size) as an alternative to a 1911 and while I shot it great, I despised the trigger and was very off put by the workmanship, especially the magazines which fit poorly, and were even more poorly constructed. But the 30SF makes a ton of sense as an alternative to my CDP. 10 +1 capacity, able to deal with the elements without fuss, and it'll take mags from my 21.

Part of my reasoning Is I don't like using the CDP as a range gun, it's an alloy frame and kicks a bit more, not bad, but I was looking for the full size 1911 for that duty. I just can't lay out a $1100 plus to do it, plus $250 worth of ammo to break it in. And it makes me think if I have the 21 for range time, I should carry the 30sf, on other words practice with the platform I carry.

VetPsychWars
September 5, 2013, 09:28 PM
Part of my reasoning Is I don't like using the CDP as a range gun, it's an alloy frame and kicks a bit more, not bad, but I was looking for the full size 1911 for that duty. I just can't lay out a $1100 plus to do it, plus $250 worth of ammo to break it in. And it makes me think if I have the 21 for range time, I should carry the 30sf, on other words practice with the platform I carry.

Perhaps you might look into a small-radius firing pin stop.

Tom

TennJed
September 5, 2013, 10:12 PM
One day you will mature and come to your senses and get rid of the glocks and 1911s and buy a revolver. It is not for everyone, just the ones with taste :)

burk
September 5, 2013, 10:35 PM
I had an LCR, and sold it, I just didn't like the power to size/weight ratio verse the LC9. but I'd buy a 4" 44 mag or .460 for Bear country in a heartbeat if I had the money. It's actually the next gun on the list. I fly-fish AK every other year, and I plan to get out to Yellowstone one of these days. We see a ton of Bears in AK, Katmai is loaded with them, but they're well fed. The bears in MT scare me though they have to scrounge for food. And I'm a slow easy to catch morsel in a pair of waders.

Got_Lead?
September 6, 2013, 12:01 AM
As a rule, a field grade 1911 won't require break-in. If you are fortune enough to have one that is put together like a Swiss watch, count your blessings!

burk
September 6, 2013, 01:02 AM
As a rule, a field grade 1911 won't require break-in. If you are fortune enough to have one that is put together like a Swiss watch, count your blessings!

You may have a point, I should just buy one of the sloppy out of spec Sigs with an outside ejector.:D

I just really like Kimbers, and I can't get any deals on Dan Wessons or Colts. They are Swiss Watch tight out of the box and they just feel right, especially compared to the Sigs and Smiths in the same price rage. The improvements in fit and finish are noticeable. But with Kimbers, you really do have to run about 400 hundred rounds of ball ammo before you even try HP's.

Got_Lead?
September 6, 2013, 01:26 AM
I would agree, my Kimber took a few hundred rounds to break in. I helped it by lapping the chamber and throating it slightly. After that, it would feed even the most difficult lead SWC's.

stressed
September 6, 2013, 02:45 AM
I had a .45 para ordinance warthawg doublestack, and it was far more attractive then my G29, however I never used it and ended up selling it to my buddy. The glock is ugly as hell, but I like thy caliber and that I can count on it.

RetiredUSNChief
September 6, 2013, 03:11 AM
Well lets see who else agrees with my assessment of whethe a 1911 is not for everyone

Personally, I don't care what these other people say, most especially when what they seem to be spouting is tripe.


Most people are better off not carrying a 1911. They require maintenance and an above average willingness to be your own gunsmith of sorts if you use them more than an occasional range toy.

No disrespect for your own personal choice in firearms, but this statement is horse pucky. I own a 1911 platform (1991A1) and the only "maintenance" or role playing as a "gunsmith" that I've ever done is to routinely clean it, as I would any other firearm. And that's 22 years of ownership behind that 1991A1.

I've fired many 1911's over the last three decades and know many people with 1911's. Not a single one of these people had any such issues with their 1911's.


Glocks are fine weapons by any measure, ugly as I think they are. And if any person wants to own one, more power to them.

But buying a 1911 ain't gonna require the owner to be a shade tree mechanic any more than buying a Glock will require the owner to wear beer goggles to appreciate its looks.


FOR THE OP:

My opinion is if you want to "go Tupperware", then simply buy yourself a Glock and be done with it. Ain't no reason to get rid of any gun to do that. Lots of good reasons to keep a perfectly good gun, and much fewer to get rid of one. If nothing else, it's an extra gun you can take to the range with a buddy, or maybe gift someone some day, maybe even as an heirloom.

savanahsdad
September 6, 2013, 05:17 AM
wow,, the glock fanboys are getting me worried about my 1911, I think I have only done a full strip down cleaning 3 times in the last 5 years :what: not sure when I cleaned it last ? I know I have ran 6 boxes of cast SWC (300rounds) 10 boxes of Berries plated RN's a box or two of Ranger SXT's and a brick or two of UMC ball ammo ... so about 1400 rounds or so , I run a wet mop down the bore , clean the ramp, and a drop of oil here and there , every time I come home from the range ,,,I'm starting to wonder how many of you pull the heads on your car to change the oil :rolleyes:,

to the OP, if a glock is what you want , then get one , I myself would get a SS 1911 and take as little care of it as you want , you would have less things rusting on a SS 1911 in the rain than you would on a glock anyway

Marty183
September 6, 2013, 05:42 AM
Keep them both. You will regret not having a 1911 in the stable, and will wind up buying another one eventually....

I agree wholeheartedly...I love my Glocks but the 1911 platform is classic...

Sent from my ADR8995 using Tapatalk 2

Manny
September 6, 2013, 06:23 AM
I did get rid of my 1911 and go all Glock and have no regrets at all. Not that it was a bad pistol at all, it was a Kimber as well and never stuttered. I just fall in to the catagory of person that views guns as working tools not pieces of functional art. Also I epitomize the Larry Vickers comment of "treating my guns the way all of us treat our lawnmowers", and the Glock is better suited for that.

My only issue with the OP's plan is that the grip of the standard G21 is just too large for me and my stubby fingers. The SF, both in 21 & 30 fits like a glove however. But considering the deal he's getting on the G21 he could get a grip reduction if it becomes an issue. The 30SF is the true gem in my book and sounds ideal for his flyfishing use.

bigmike45
September 6, 2013, 10:47 AM
I have always been a 1911 guy, and experience an occasional stove pipe or failure to feed, just like any other autoloaded does, but only in my shorter than 5" 1911's. Even those are almost flawless and I have done nothing to them. Keep in mind the JMB Masterpiece that we all know as the 1911, was a 5" gun. Believe it or not everything else is a bastardization of a masterpiece. I own and carry several of those of which I speak. Now I am open minded so let me say I bought two Glocks, both 5", one 45 & one 10mm, my favorite calibers.

When I grip my 1911's, close my eyes and raise them to shooting level, then open my eyes, the sights are almost perfectly aligned, even with a one hand hold. This is not the case with either Glock.

I took them to the range and put 100 rounds through all 4. They all shot without any problems and I shot handloads in them, not factory ammo.

My 1911's shot more accurately than the Glocks, and I am sure it was a combination of two reasons. One I have been shooting the 1911 for over 30 years and only 2 years with the Glocks. The second being the Glocks do not fit my hand well because of the grip shape, width and angle. I understand the newer versons are different.

Now lets talk about asthetics...yes the look of the gun means a lot to me. Its like either driving a cadillac or an impala. Both are General Motors Cars and both will get you from point A to point B....but the cadillac will get you there more comfortably and in a little classier style. The Glock is uglier than a mud fence where the 1911 is a piece of machined beauty, and properly blued..well, like I said a masterpiece.

I no longer have trhe Glocks, sold them both to a lover of the Glock and he happily shoots them with me, side by side at the range.

Do I trust the 1911, with my life....yes, and 4" version is my main carry and on my hip as I type.

460Kodiak
September 6, 2013, 12:25 PM
I like 1911's and poly guns both, and own both. Poly has its uses, but so does a 1911.

Poly is a tool, a 1911 is a tool and an heirloom.

I see no reason to restrict your buying unless you really just don't care about 1911s.

Now Kimber 1911s is another story. I won't own one due to a bad experience with one, and their customer relations. Don't like the company, so I won't buy their guns. JMO. Lots of happy Kimber owners out there.

The only reason I ever get rid of a gun is if I lose interest in it and don't care about shooting it anymore. Has happened many times to me. Regret none of my trades.

CountGlockulla
September 6, 2013, 12:44 PM
No disrespect for your own personal choice in firearms

I have and carry both 1911s and Glocks. I dont hate either platform and have used both extensively. A properly setup 1911 with some good magazines makes for a great carry gun.

However for the OP I believe a Glock 30sf is the way to go for his situation. He mentioned specifically that he has a Kimber and his gun gets wet. Kimber's stainless steel barrels have well-documented problems with rusting easily in such environments. Me personally, I’ve had 3 do this.

Personally, I don't care what these other people say, most especially when what they seem to be spouting is tripe.

With all do respect that shows your ignorance. Those are two of the most well respected 1911 gunsmiths in the world. Those guys have extensive experience using the platform in military and police operations. When they do take the time to build a 1911 they sell for over $5K easily.

I own a 1911 platform (1991A1) and the only "maintenance" or role playing as a "gunsmith" that I've ever done is to routinely clean it, as I would any other firearm. And that's 22 years of ownership behind that 1991A1.


What is horsepucky is basing your assertations around a sample size on 1. How often do you shoot your gun? 500 rounds a year on a static range? Also do you mean to say that in owning that gun for 22 years you have never changed even the recoil spring?

wow,, the glock fanboys are getting worried about my 1911, I think I have only done a full strip down cleaning 3 times in the last 5 years not sure when I cleaned it last ? I know I have ran 6 boxes of cast SWC (300rounds) 10 boxes of Berries plated RN's a box or two of Ranger SXT's and a brick or two of UMC ball ammo ... so about 1400 rounds or so , I run a wet mop down the bore , clean the ramp, and a drop of oil here and there , every time I come home from the range ,,,I'm starting to wonder how many of you pull the heads on your car to change the oil

1400 rounds in five years. You have not even gotten past the point of needing to change your first recoil spring yet. Sarcastic answers do not make up for lack of experience.

Robert101
September 6, 2013, 01:01 PM
My experience over the years confirms that the Glock is more reliable than the 1911 configuration. I own both and do shoot both. I have Glocks that have never had a FTF or FTE. Can't say that with any 1911 I've owned and I have DW's and SA guns which are not at the low end of the 1911 world. If I have to pick a hammer that is going to hit the nail every time, guess which hammer I'm going to use when I really need it.

Buzznrose
September 6, 2013, 01:03 PM
I'm a Glock shooter, mainly by logic. They shoot anything well, are reliable, easy to tear down and put back together, and are inexpensive (I buy blue labels).

The "romantic" in me dearly wants to buy a nice 1911 (Springfield MC Operator) but the frugal part of me says but a G30...and he's winning so far.

But I know one thing...y'all who carry $1000 1911's ever use it in a SD shooting, you can probably kiss it good bye for a long time, which would suck bad, while most of us who carry plastic can probably deal with the loss a bit better.

buck460XVR
September 6, 2013, 01:36 PM
I would eat more beans and tuna, save some money, keep the Kimber and buy the Glock. At that price you could sell the tupperwear and turn a nice profit. :evil:

This. While I'm not a big Kimber fan, the 1911 is a great platform. Maybe you could make enough off the Glock to trade the Kimber in on a stainless Colt.........;)

RetiredUSNChief
September 6, 2013, 08:00 PM
I have and carry both 1911s and Glocks. I dont hate either platform and have used both extensively. A properly setup 1911 with some good magazines makes for a great carry gun.

However for the OP I believe a Glock 30sf is the way to go for his situation. He mentioned specifically that he has a Kimber and his gun gets wet. Kimber's stainless steel barrels have well-documented problems with rusting easily in such environments. Me personally, I’ve had 3 do this.

With all do respect that shows your ignorance. Those are two of the most well respected 1911 gunsmiths in the world. Those guys have extensive experience using the platform in military and police operations. When they do take the time to build a 1911 they sell for over $5K easily.

What is horsepucky is basing your assertations around a sample size on 1. How often do you shoot your gun? 500 rounds a year on a static range? Also do you mean to say that in owning that gun for 22 years you have never changed even the recoil spring?

1400 rounds in five years. You have not even gotten past the point of needing to change your first recoil spring yet. Sarcastic answers do not make up for lack of experience.

Cool! I like this assessment (in bold) much better. It's much more relevant and meaningful. Though I don't have a problem with my own 1991A1 in wet weather, including a few canoe trips which thoroughly doused my pistol (one where I went several feet under water). And there are plenty of stainless examples of the 1911 platform, as well.


As for my "ignorance" as it applies to "two of the most well respected 1911 gunsmiths in the world", again I don't care. Their input, valued though it may be due to their experience and reputations, must still be weighed against my own knowledge and practical experiences just as it must be weighed against yours or anybody else's. I accept little at face value, even from experts, because everything I read from such people is automatically filtered through my own training, education, and experience. Where I am deficient on matters that interest me, I study up in order to understand them.

In otherwords, their word does not automatically invalidate mine, nor my experience.


My assertations are not based on a sample size of 1. It's based on my own 1911 platform which I've owned for 22 years AND three decades of personal experience with several OTHER 1911 platforms AND the many others I know over a half-century of life who also own 1911 platforms...many of whom have a number of decades more than my life as practical experience with it.

I'm sure you presented the numbers of rounds as examples, but they're nowhere near close to the numbers I've put through my gun. I put 500 through it the first day I owned it and went back for more. And though I haven't used it for any kind of formal combat or self-defense training, it's been through quite a bit of static and dynamic target shooting and even small game and varmint hunting. (Though I'll freely admit that a 230 gr .45 is a wee bit of overkill for squirrel.)

This has not been a "shelf-gun", which only gets brought out for occasional shooting and cleaning once every year or so. It's a well used, often carried pistol. Maybe other people like yourself shoot far more rounds, far more often, and in more formalized self-defense training formats than I do. But I daresay I'm no spring chicken in my own right.

The recoil spring? Back when I first bought my 1991A1, I also bought a 5 inch one for a brother of mine. We bought a couple dozen springs and split them up between us shortly after we got the guns, noting the numbers of rounds were were putting through them. (We bought so many to avoid the hassle of going out and buying them every time we needed them. Wht the heck...they're cheap, right?) After he lost his gun (in divorce...long story), I bought him a replacement in the short barreled commander version. Since he couldn't use the rest of his springs, he gave them to me (7 of them).

Out of a total of 19 recoil springs, I have 5 remaining. I habitually change the spring between 3,000 and 5,000 rounds, as conveniently measured by the numbers of ammo cans of ammunition I go through. This means I've gone through a MINIMUM of 42,000 rounds in my pistol alone.

Though there have been a few years where my level of shooting that pistol dropped way off, I'd have to safely say that it's definately NOT a "low milage" pistol. Even if the vast majority of rounds were target shooting and plinking.


But none of that really matters because the point I was disputing was where you said "Most people are better off not carrying a 1911. They require maintenance and an above average willingness to be your own gunsmith of sorts if you use them more than an occasional range toy."

My personal experience does not show this to be true. Nor does the personal experience of many people I know who also own 1911 platforms.


Next assumption?

;)

jrdolall
September 6, 2013, 08:45 PM
1911's are beautiful.

Glocks are butt ugly.

A beautiful woman will break your heart after spending your money.

A butt ugly woman will never let you down.

I prefer beautiful women.

jrdolall
September 6, 2013, 08:49 PM
RetiredUSNChief.

Stop arguing/debating with a Glock fan. It's like arguing with a woman about her shoes.

See my above post^.

RetiredUSNChief
September 6, 2013, 09:40 PM
RetiredUSNChief.

Stop arguing/debating with a Glock fan. It's like arguing with a woman about her shoes.

See my above post^.

Heh!

Interestingly, I'm not debating the qualifications of a Glock at all, ugly though I consider them to be.

:)

savanahsdad
September 6, 2013, 10:36 PM
Countglocklla, please read before you type ! and please go edit your post #50
1400 rounds OR SO since I last strip it down for a good cleaning ! not 1400 in five years :banghead:, as for my smart comment , I was pointing out a lot of posts here seem to think a 1911 is a lot of work, and that is just not true, like I said before in 5 years I have only done a full strip down 3 times , how many rounds ??? I have buckets of brass , I could guess... 8K OR SO...


NOTE: Full strip down is to bare frame and bare slide,

browningguy
September 6, 2013, 10:50 PM
They require maintenance and an above average willingness to be your own gunsmith of sorts if you use them more than an occasional range toy.

That's exactly why most of the 1911's that have problems don't want to run, people keep trying to improve them. It's not quite as easy to take apart as say my Xdm's, but it certainly doesn't take a gunsmith.

Since this is the high road I won't say what I think of someones opinion that a 1911 is an occasional range toy. But suffice to say 100 years of history in the military, going to war in every part of world, is hardly an occasional range toy.

JTQ
September 7, 2013, 08:33 AM
CountGlockulla wrote,
Kimber's stainless steel barrels have well-documented problems with rusting easily in such environments. Me personally, Iíve had 3 do this.
This problem could possibly be attributed to a misunderstanding by many Kimber owners. Most of Kimber's barrels are not stainless steel, but merely unfinished, left "in the white" steel. These barrels, if not taken care of properly will rust much easier than a stainless steel barrel.

CountGlockulla
September 7, 2013, 09:51 AM
I have owned 30+ 1911s, carried, trained with, and competed with the platform. Not all 1911s are created equal or are built to the specs of those that "went through the war." I've had to weed out magazines, fix extractors, polish feed ramps, change out stripped grip screw bushings, change or fix sear springs (requires understanding of what each leaf does), change out triggers, stone trigger tracks, square hammer hooks, diagnose and correct hammer follow, stake loose plunger tubes, debur mainspring housings, fix mag catches, diagnosing and fix premature slide lock back, and then more serious issues that did require a professional gun smith rather than just a "gunsmith of sorts" as I just described. I'm not going to argue semantics because it is asinine and tedious. The fact remains that serious end users are required to learns much more about the platform than your average Glock or M&P would. If he is going to fix some of those common issues I described above he may also be required to purchase special tools.

Speaking of storming European countries, I have an original military contract Colt manufactured between 1917-1918. It required extensive modification by a gunsmith before it became a serviceable carry handgun.

Anyway y'all fun.

bannockburn
September 7, 2013, 10:46 AM
Avoiding the whole M1911 vs. Glock debate, I choose instead to simply go with the design which is the best fit for my hand. With the possible exception of the Glock 19, all their other models just don't work for me. And when it came to getting a compact polymer 9mm. I went with the Ruger SR9c instead of the Glock 19. Better overall fit and feel with the Ruger gave it the edge for what I wanted it for.

As for M1911s well let's say I have yet to have a single stack model that I didn't like or feel totally comfortable with.

savanahsdad
September 7, 2013, 11:51 AM
I have owned 30+ 1911s, carried, trained with, and competed with the platform. Not all 1911s are created equal or are built to the specs of those that "went through the war." I've had to weed out magazines, fix extractors, polish feed ramps, change out stripped grip screw bushings, change or fix sear springs (requires understanding of what each leaf does), change out triggers, stone trigger tracks, square hammer hooks, diagnose and correct hammer follow, stake loose plunger tubes, debur mainspring housings, fix mag catches, diagnosing and fix premature slide lock back, and then more serious issues that did require a professional gun smith rather than just a "gunsmith of sorts" as I just described. I'm not going to argue semantics because it is asinine and tedious. The fact remains that serious end users are required to learns much more about the platform than your average Glock or M&P would. If he is going to fix some of those common issues I described above he may also be required to purchase special tools.

Speaking of storming European countries, I have an original military contract Colt manufactured between 1917-1918. It required extensive modification by a gunsmith before it became a serviceable carry handgun.

Anyway y'all fun.
well it sounds like you have been around the block a few times , and with some bad luck I might ad, but this don't change where you clearly misspoke in post #50 ,,, that's ok other members will figure it out ,


To the OP, if my count is right most would say get the glock and keep the 1911, plus both those guns keep there value , so you wont lose on either of them you may even make a few bucks on that glock at that price

TennJed
September 7, 2013, 12:31 PM
This problem could possibly be attributed to a misunderstanding by many Kimber owners. Most of Kimber's barrels are not stainless steel, but merely unfinished, left "in the white" steel. These barrels, if not taken care of properly will rust much easier than a stainless steel barrel.

Is there a reason Kimber does that? What advantages does the "in the white steel" I've stainless

burk
September 7, 2013, 12:44 PM
Is there a reason Kimber does that? What advantages does the "in the white steel" I've stainless
There using Carbon steel which they claim (truthfully I might add) is much easier to precision machine than Stainless. Stainless is tough to work with, when you get into polishing and rifling, and much harder on tooling. They offer stainless on some of their real high end stuff. But their barrels are prone to light surface pitting and corrosion (on the outside). I've never had an issue with the inside of one. And I do think they have the finest fit and finish until you spend about $1500 for a 1911. They sure are tack drivers. my old Target (which I sold) gave me 1.75" groups at 25 yards off the bench.

VetPsychWars
September 7, 2013, 09:46 PM
Speaking of storming European countries, I have an original military contract Colt manufactured between 1917-1918. It required extensive modification by a gunsmith before it became a serviceable carry handgun.

I disbelieve. If it was original specification, it NEEDED nothing. But people are convinced they need all the toys.

So do tell what you did to it?

Tom

Walkalong
September 7, 2013, 09:53 PM
You should carry what you are comfortable with and shoot well. Plain and simple. No one gun is right for everyone.

It doesn't matter what you carry, as long as it is dependable, you shoot it well, and you are confident in your abilities with it.

I didn't mention a certain design(s) because I don't know what that is for you. I do know what they are for me, but that won't help you.

Now I'm considering selling the Kimber CDP Pro,

That is one of my options. While 1911s are not for everyone, and some 1911 lovers despise the short guns, I love mine (http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=127161&stc=1&d=1283690603).

mljdeckard
September 8, 2013, 02:31 AM
I sold my 1911 for a G-22 and carried it for several years. I never stopped wishing I had a 1911 trigger, I never stopped lusting every time I saw a 1911. I never shot the Glock as well as I shot the 1911.

I sold the Glock and bought a Kimber in 2003 and have never regretted it since. I am pretty exclusively a 1911 guy now, but I also very much enjoy my wife's XD-9, I would prefer it to a Glock. I even run a .22 conversion kit on my 1911.

VAPOPO
September 8, 2013, 02:40 AM
Not every gun is for every one. Good thing there are literally thousands of differant guns out there to fit everyone's tastes. I dont like plastic framed guns but am large enough and have several top flight holsters and more importantly great belts so carrying a full sized 1911 is not an issue.

Lately I have been bitten by the CZ bug and now have 4 differant guns from that manufacturer the P01 being my carry gun at the moment. When jacket weather comes around that will change back to a .45 acp either old faithful 1911 or a SIG 220 carry DAK that is really growing on me.

I also own a couple revolvers and the security six may find it's way into a IWB before to long. In short do what fits your pocketbook now, as things get better down the road you can always be more choosy about what you carry.


Plus you never know what might fall into your lap.

Girodin
September 8, 2013, 02:54 PM
I'd buy that bargain glock because the price is so good. If you are goin to sell the limber I'd replace it with an HK 45 or 45c.

Quentin
September 9, 2013, 12:57 PM
I kept my Colt Series 70 Government Model after switching to the Glock a couple years ago. I bought that Colt new in 1976 when all my friends still carried revolvers and gave me a hard time about "unreliable automatics". (Thank you Jeff Cooper!) It was by my side for 35 years. It was an excellent choice then and even today. I'm still very comfortable with the Colt and a couple other 1911s picked up over the years so I'm hanging on to them because I trust them and love the design.

But like the OP I came across a $350 Glock (G22 LE trade-in) and figured at that price why not try Glock along with the 40S&W. I was impressed and couldn't ignore the difference between 8 and 16 rounds. Since then I got the G23 and G27 to have the right size 40 for the occasion. Maybe I should have gone with 9mm but that's a long drop from 45ACP so 40S&W felt comfortable. Going 45ACP also was tempting!

Anyway, an old dog can learn new tricks. I have a reliable handgun at my side. If I lost it, it is replaceable. Losing the old Colt would hurt so it resides in the safe most of these days.

No wrong answers here and a Glock 21 for $350 is hard to refuse. Once you get it and try it out you'll know which path is right for you.

wickedsprint
September 9, 2013, 04:37 PM
Loose plunger tubes, grip screws, misaligned frames, sights falling off and a lot of weight to carry for 8rds were enough to sour me on them.

For a working tool, tupperware in any of the recent flavors are hard to beat.

Skylerbone
September 9, 2013, 07:39 PM
I know some aren't old enough to remember this but back when I grew up, there weren't no Glock. Back then things were heavy, cars had big motors and you didn't trade 'em every 4 years for an Earth Friendlier model. And firearms? They worked.

I'm a multi-platform kinda guy, never really wished for fewer choices either. The few bugs I've had to work out have involved both 1911s and polymers but the only stoppages I've ever incurred were all with a polymer pistol, though it was a rimfire.

OP, I'd say what you need is some Eezox on that barrel. That ought to solve real cheap the original $2 question, how to deal with rust.

Baba Louie
September 10, 2013, 02:21 AM
Chocolate... Vanilla
Old... New
Heavy... Light
A few rounds... a few more
Sweet Trigger pull... uh spongebobsproingBANG (low left Again?!?! :rolleyes:)

All dogs are good. Some just have different and/or better points than others for some dog owners.

If selling your 1911 for a G21 is what you want, do it. Fine weapons those 21s. Kinda big and blocky for some hands as you know. With enough practice on it alone, that low left stuff should stop soon if not immediately as I recall.

Which generation 21 are you looking at getting? (or did you get it already and I missed that post?)

gym
September 10, 2013, 11:41 AM
Switch to the Glock, or keep both if you are able. Nothing worse than losing a gun because of an emergency that you spent money and time making a thing of beauty and precision. If it gets knocked off a shooting bench or dropped you won't be as upset with yourself as you would be otherwise. Same goes for having a weapon held in case of an incident.
I had a custom pistol scratched terribly, "I could have fixed it but it was ruined to me".

txgunsuscg
September 10, 2013, 12:32 PM
I have carried Glocks and 1911s, and I'm certified as an armorer for both. I carried my Glocks as my go to guns for a while and now I've gone back to 1911s. In my experience, assuming you have a decent gun to start with (a quick search will demonstrate my issues with Armscor), either should serve you well. Given the option, I would keep the 1911 and buy the Glock. Shoot and carry both, see which one you like more, then stick with that one. If you want to sell the other at that point, do so with no regrets. Please note that I will not attempt to convince you of the superiority of one over the other. You could go back and forth all day. Yes, Glocks are in very common use, so are 1911s (USMS SOG, LAPD, some specialized DOD functions, MARSOC). Opinions are like, uh, armpits and so forth. The price for the Glock seems great, and if nothing else, you will have added yet another very useful tool to your "toolbox." Do what works for you.

burk
October 8, 2013, 05:40 PM
Well, here's an update. I shot the 21 today with the improved spring and shock buff, I noticed a slight difference. But I still wasn't pleased with my groups. I also shot my G19 and it was lights out accurate again. I'm wondering if the oversized grips which seem to sit in my hand ok are effecting my grip. Either way I'm at one more range session, to decide wether it's a keeper or not. I'm sure I can make some money on it selling it.

One question, does any one have any experience with weighted grip plugs (seattle) in a 21? I have them in my G19 and love them, it is almost as mild a shooter as my .22

So I may be looking for another full sized 1911 w/rail for night stand use anyway. I know I shoot them great

powder
October 8, 2013, 10:37 PM
I have Glocks and 1911s.

Never a Kimber: trade it for a SA or Colt CRG.

railroadman
October 9, 2013, 06:10 AM
I like the 45acp this C/D pistol is GREAT,just got a EMS 4 inch with a pile of magazine,s like new. Like my 1917 S&W revolver and a Llama 1911.45acp.Now I really need a 1927 Thompson carbine.

gpjoe
October 9, 2013, 06:52 AM
But I know one thing...y'all who carry $1000 1911's ever use it in a SD shooting, you can probably kiss it good bye for a long time, which would suck bad, while most of us who carry plastic can probably deal with the loss a bit better.

No big deal.

I pay more yearly for car insurance than the cost of my Colt 1911 XSE.

Vodoun da Vinci
October 9, 2013, 07:22 AM
I'll never give up my 1911's. I'm buying a Glock 26 and I'm thrilled to be moving into plastic finally. But sell the all steel, JMB designed classic?

I learned a long time ago not to sell guns....they always appreciate and I always end up wishing I had it back in a few years.

VooDoo

claiborne
October 9, 2013, 11:22 AM
See, the problem is in this statement from the OP

"won't cost me 400 rounds of ball ammo to break in."

Never trust a pistol that requires this.

I have owned 8 or 9 1911 pistols including a S&W target, Dan Wesson PM-7, Les Baer TRS, several SA's and a few Colt's. The S&W, DW and LB required the most money to purchase and were the most unreliable out of the box. Called all three companies and was told the pistols would require a "break in period".

See, the problem is if you have to hit the line while it is hot, and you are handed a new pistol, you better pray you don't have a new pistol that requires a "break in period".

My stock, Colt repro series 70 is the most reliable 1911 I have owned, it did not require a break in period, digests all acp ammo I have used and is very accurate. It is more reliable than the Glock 20SF that I had for awhile.
When all you people start getting away from all the fancy do-dads that you think you need on your guns, you might find your reliability gets better and your shooting enjoyment goes up. I am not plugging Colt, I am plugging this particular handgun.:D

My Grandpa, a WWII vet, gunsmith and a Deputy Sheriff for 25 years told me many times, "Never trust a pair of boots or a pistol that needs breaking in; If they don't fit or work from the git-go, you done wasted your money."

burk
October 9, 2013, 02:02 PM
See, the problem is in this statement from the OP

"won't cost me 400 rounds of ball ammo to break in."

Never trust a pistol that requires this.

I have owned 8 or 9 1911 pistols including a S&W target, Dan Wesson PM-7, Les Baer TRS, several SA's and a few Colt's. The S&W, DW and LB required the most money to purchase and were the most unreliable out of the box. Called all three companies and was told the pistols would require a "break in period".

See, the problem is if you have to hit the line while it is hot, and you are handed a new pistol, you better pray you don't have a new pistol that requires a "break in period".

My stock, Colt repro series 70 is the most reliable 1911 I have owned, it did not require a break in period, digests all acp ammo I have used and is very accurate. It is more reliable than the Glock 20SF that I had for awhile.
When all you people start getting away from all the fancy do-dads that you think you need on your guns, you might find your reliability gets better and your shooting enjoyment goes up. I am not plugging Colt, I am plugging this particular handgun.:D

My Grandpa, a WWII vet, gunsmith and a Deputy Sheriff for 25 years told me many times, "Never trust a pair of boots or a pistol that needs breaking in; If they don't fit or work from the git-go, you done wasted your money."
While there is some truth to this I want trust any pistol without at least 100 zero trouble rounds thru it. And then I'm going to fire a couple of mags of SD ammo before I judge it reliable enough to trust my life too. Kimbers IME are tight, this is good, you have a great frame to slide fit in the stock gun (as good as I've seen consistently in their price range). But that tight frame does require at least a bit of break in. The thing is you have to run 1911 and for that matter all steel slide/frame guns wet for optimum performance. For a 5" I imagine you could get away with less rounds, provided they were trouble free, but the reality is the 1911 has one of the longest paths of travel from the lips of the magazine to the chamber of any platform, anything that throws off that geometry can cause issues.

My CDP had no unusual hiccups during break in except an occasional face flyer on ejection. But that all ended with XP springs, I will admit the 4" Kimbers are a bit under-sprung. But it has given me about 2500 trouble free rounds, my Eclipse (which I had to sell) gave me about 10,000 rounds without issue. BUT, I'd love to have the Glock work out, it is certainly a much less costly solution.

So far, It's been 100% reliable, I'm just not getting as tight of groups as I should. I don't know if it's the recoil on the light gun or the humungous grip, but like I said, one more chance.

Again, Has anyone tried the Seattle weighted grip plugs in a G21, I have them in my G19. I'm wondering if the extra weight might settle it down a bit?

tarosean
October 9, 2013, 03:17 PM
I'm just not getting as tight of groups as I should.

No offense intended, but its not a precision instrument nor was it ever intended to be.

I have a few and they will never compete with my 1911's for accuracy.

burk
October 9, 2013, 09:15 PM
No offense intended, but its not a precision instrument nor was it ever intended to be.

I have a few and they will never compete with my 1911's for accuracy.
Well my G19 does. I don't expect 1 1/2" at 25 yards. But I'd like 3" with fairly rapid fire at 7 yards. My G 19 will do it all day, as will my Kimber CDP. I had a M & P .45 and that shot good groups, I just couldn't get with the trigger or the pathetic workmanship in the mags. I haven't talked to anyone who has accuracy issues with the G21.

Phaedrus/69
October 10, 2013, 02:48 AM
I don't think Kimbers are a great example of the breed. I sold my last Kimber and will probably never buy another. My next 1911 will probably be an STI.

It's pretty simple- it you shoot the Glock as well as the 1911 and don't see using the latter, sell it. Life is too short. Unless it's a family heirloom (unlikely) sell it, get a Glock and spend the difference on a Dillon progressive setup and shoot the crap out of it. I certainly can't shoot a Glock as well as a 1911 but if you can, do it. NOTE: I'll concede it's possible. I know an older guy, good friend of my dad, he can shoot his Glock as well as some guys shoot a rifle offhand at 25 yards. He shot bullseye for three or four decades. Guy can really run a pistol, any pistol.

tarosean
October 10, 2013, 09:54 AM
Well my G19 does. I don't expect 1 1/2" at 25 yards. But I'd like 3" with fairly rapid fire at 7 yards. My G 19 will do it all day, as will my Kimber CDP. I had a M & P .45 and that shot good groups, I just couldn't get with the trigger or the pathetic workmanship in the mags. I haven't talked to anyone who has accuracy issues with the G21.

Got ya... It should definitely be able to do what your asking. Since your experienced with another poly 45 its likely not recoil management.

Bench rest the gun and see what happens..

JR24
October 10, 2013, 01:30 PM
Most people are better off not carrying a 1911. They require maintenance and an above average willingness to be your own gunsmith of sorts if you use them more than an occasional range toy.


Huh, strange. My multiple middle of the road 1911's have never required any more maintainance than any of my "plastic fantastic" guns except maybe some extra oil here and there. Well, the Sigs want more oil, so not even that. All my 1911's do is keep eating all the ammo I throw at them and putting accurate rounds down range every. single. time. Kinda like a Glock...

I was a bit leery about getting my first Kimber (Pro Carry II) but it has been nothing but fantastic and has had absolutely zero problems.


As for Glocks, I mostly don't like them but the ones that "fit" me best were the 19 and the .. what's the single stack .45? 30? 36? whichever-short frame. The others I can't shoot worth squat, so maybe you're like me and the 21 just doesn't fit.

Stevie-Ray
October 11, 2013, 08:11 PM
Most people are better off not carrying a 1911. They require maintenance and an above average willingness to be your own gunsmith of sorts if you use them more than an occasional range toy.
Seriously? I own 3 1911s and 2 Glocks. One Glock was bought as a night biking piece, for it's small size and the ability to use one-handed, due to it's smaller caliber, and one was bought as a utility woods gun, actually replacing a 1911 of the same caliber, so I could keep the 1911 looking as nice as it was. Banging a Glock around the woods with isn't going to ugly it up any more than it already is. Another 1911 is my EDC for the last 10 years or more. Doubtful that will change. Anyway, all the above get the same maintenance to keep them running like tops. I'm inferring that some believe that Glocks don't require maintenance. Anybody that carries an unmaintained Glock, hopefully you never really need it.

Oh, and OP-sorry your Kimber is such a dud. My EDC is an Ultra CDP, and either of my Glocks could only dream of being such a gun.

burk
October 11, 2013, 09:43 PM
Stevie-Ray, I'm the OP, and I never said my Kimber was a "dud". They're great guns and I believe one of the best values in 1911's. My only quandary is wether or not the platform makes since for my needs. I suspect my issues with the G21 are due to the oversized grip throwing off my target acquisition. I'm going to give it one more chance and try a couple off a bench, but my 1911 feels awful nice in my hands. I'm thinking more and more about ordering a Kimber Custom II RL LE, slapping some VZ grips on it and being done with it.

MagnumWill
October 12, 2013, 12:19 PM
From the other side of the coin - I have my compact Colt 1911 (New Agent) and so far I have two friends with Glocks, that we went shooting and they now pine over my 1911. I do NOT pine over their Glocks.

However, I wouldn't mind one bit owning a Glock 19, they were still a lot of fun to shoot. It's the gun that I know I could rely on it, and when it's empty, I can throw it at my assailant without screaming "NOOO!!!" and running after it :p

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