Use of wd40


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abl760
September 17, 2013, 04:00 PM
Where Did the WD40 and 3 in one oils fall in disuse in gun world. Is there any
proof they should not be used.I read in a beretta nano manuel not
to use wd40. Also a bike manufacture said not to use wd40 but a different one says its is good stuff. Hope someone could shed some light on this idea.
ab

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bainter1212
September 17, 2013, 04:10 PM
WD40 is a good cleaner, but a poor lubricant. Ever have a sticky door lock, and spray WD into it? You have to do it again and again every other month. It also leaves a sticky residue not conducive to long term lubrication.

It is a great degreaser but once again, NOT a good lubricant.

Schwing
September 17, 2013, 04:11 PM
WD40 has been known to remove all lubrication. It is also a common misconception that wd40 is a lubricant... it is not. If you want to test this, take a piece of plain steel, clean it really good with wd40 and set it outside somewhere. Do the same using something like rem oil and then compare the 2 pieces of metal in a few months. The wd40 piece will be rusted, corroded, etc.

tnxdshooter
September 17, 2013, 04:21 PM
Where Did the WD40 and 3 in one oils fall in disuse in gun world. Is there any
proof they should not be used.I read in a beretta nano manuel not
to use wd40. Also a bike manufacture said not to use wd40 but a different one says its is good stuff. Hope someone could shed some light on this idea.
ab

Plenty of proof. My grandpa and I were talking guns and he happened to mention his Smith and Wesson .38 was gummed up to where he couldn't open the cylinder or even pull the trigger. I asked him when the last time he cleaned it was thinking he hadn't cleaned it on a while. He said 3 days ago. I said really? What did you clean it with? He said wd40. There was the problem. He promptly cleaned it with I think it was rem oil and it functioned flawlessly again.

Sent from my mind using ninja telepathy.

tnxdshooter
September 17, 2013, 04:24 PM
WD40 has been known to remove all lubrication. It is also a common misconception that wd40 is a lubricant... it is not. If you want to test this, take a piece of plain steel, clean it really good with wd40 and set it outside somewhere. Do the same using something like rem oil and then compare the 2 pieces of metal in a few months. The wd40 piece will be rusted, corroded, etc.

Its not a lubricant but a water displacer. It can only "displace" so much water. Thus it provides poor corrosion and lubrication properties.

Sent from my mind using ninja telepathy.

jimmyraythomason
September 17, 2013, 04:30 PM
WD-40 is a very GOOD rust preventative(http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/lid=10700/learn/Gun-Cleaning-Clinic-Knowing-the-Limits-of-Rust-Preventatives) and cleaner. If used properly it will not gum up metal works. Too many people want to blame the results of poor cleaning habits on the product they use. I've used it on my guns for more years than many on THR have been alive and am happy with it and continue to use it.

abl760
September 17, 2013, 04:59 PM
I Have been waiting for the barrels of my junk to rot off, But it has not shown
any problem since 1961
Ab

Carl N. Brown
September 17, 2013, 05:04 PM
Water displacement formula 40 was designed to displace water on wet electrical contacts and leave behind a waxy film after the solvent evaporates.

I have sprayed WD40 into a metal cup, and came back to the cup every weekend or so. Fresh WD40 was very runny when the solvent was fresh, but as the solvent evaporated, it got thicker, until it was the consistency of molasses.

Within its limitations, it is a cheap, readily available cleaner. If I use it as a cleaner, I wipe it off after cleaning and use a regular gun oil for lubrication. I have also used it to wipe the metal exterior of a gun to break up finger prints to prevent surface rusting.

If you have a mechanism gummed up with dried out WD40, fresh WD40 will dissolve it. Then you can blow it out with brake cleaner.

Classic 3 in 1 oil is another combination of pentrator oil and lubricating oil, and it always worked for me on bicyles, but I was not a perfectionist.

Clark
September 17, 2013, 07:38 PM
Before there was a www gun forum [early 1990s] there was usenet rec.guns.

The question of WD40 was constantly beat to death.
I even called up an application engineer at the WD40 manufacturer. That info can still be accessed through Google groups.

So in 1999 in the parking lot at a gun show I met some people that wanted to sell three shotguns for $185 each.
I smelled WD40 in the guns, so I figured that they did not know much about guns.
So I offered $185 for all three.
They took it.

When I got them home, I cleaned out the WD40.

Under the rubber butt pad of the double barrel was a 1936 Ohio hunting license for someone 26 years old. The cost of the license was $1.

jimmyraythomason
September 17, 2013, 07:55 PM
I smelled WD40 in the guns, so I figured that they did not know much about guns.Wow. I promise you that you WILL smell WD-40 on my guns,my tools,my shop equipment,my truck and my lawn care equipment. I can also promise you that I'm very knowledgeable in the care and maintenance of all of them.

beag_nut
September 17, 2013, 09:46 PM
I echo what Schwing said.
WD40 is crap.

HighExpert
September 17, 2013, 10:47 PM
I use WD-40 to hose out my bullseye guns before pulling them down. Getting the grit out before you disturb the closely fitted parts will prolong the accuracy of the weapon. I then tear down, wipe clean and lube. Works for me.

OptimusPrime
September 17, 2013, 10:58 PM
The OP mentioned 3 in 1 oil too, but I don't get what's wrong with it?
I've been using it for decades on all my stuff and we are fine shape. What is the danger of 3 in 1?

Drail
September 17, 2013, 10:59 PM
You can certainly use WD 40 on anything you want (I wouldn't) but for firearms there are SO many better lubes and cleaners on the market. I have seen WD 40 lubed mechanisms become totally gummed up after a while. Another application of WD 40 will loosen it back up but in time it's going to get gummy again. Try a bottle of Breakfree CLP.

tnxdshooter
September 18, 2013, 03:38 AM
Wow. I promise you that you WILL smell WD-40 on my guns,my tools,my shop equipment,my truck and my lawn care equipment. I can also promise you that I'm very knowledgeable in the care and maintenance of all of them.

Obviously not or you wouldn't use wd40 on your guns.

Better penetrating oil is Kano Kroil. Better cleaner and corrosion fighter is eezox. Better long term storage corrosion fighter is rig grease.

Sent from my mind using ninja telepathy.

jimmyraythomason
September 18, 2013, 07:18 AM
Obviously not or you wouldn't use wd40 on your gunsWith over 40 years of using WD-40 on my entire gun collection without rust or gumming or ANY adverse condition that it could possibly be linked to,I can say without reservation that WD-40 has performed ever task with colors flying. I literally bathe gun parts fresh out of the bluing solution in it(or after a hot soap scrub down). If used correctly,WD-40 will serve the gun owner very well.

tnxdshooter
September 18, 2013, 07:22 AM
With over 40 years of using WD-40 on my entire gun collection without rust or gumming or ANY adverse condition that it could possibly be linked to,I can say without reservation that WD-40 has performed ever task with colors flying. I literally bathe gun parts fresh out of the bluing solution in it(or after a hot soap scrub down). If used correctly,WD-40 will serve the gun owner very well.

You're an exception to the rule. Everyone I have known over the years that have used wd40 on their guns has had them gum up. PERIOD!

I'll never use it and most people would be smart not to use it. But to each their own.

Sent from my mind using ninja telepathy.

bainter1212
September 18, 2013, 08:33 AM
I fix appliances for a living and if there is one thing I know from experience, it is that if I use WD on a moving part, I will have to come out all over again another day to repeat the process (and lose money in the meantime). YMMV

4v50 Gary
September 18, 2013, 08:46 AM
WD-40 isn't a lubricant but a water displacer. It leaves a film that gums up the action. Don't use it for guns.

jimmyraythomason
September 18, 2013, 09:49 AM
You're an exception to the ruleActually I am not alone,it is that TOO many have given up trying to counter such a response as I have gotten here. Do a search of THR threads on WD-40. I don't care what anyone else uses for guns or anything else. I just get SO blasted tired of a good product being trashed. I have even heard (on THR.no less) that WD-40 CAUSES rust. You would be surprised,too at how many STILL think it contains fish oil.

The Bushmaster
September 18, 2013, 10:19 AM
WD-40 is great for loosening rusty nuts and bolts. It's also great for removing glue residue. Anything else? Nodda chance. I keep my WD-40 in my shop. Far, far away from my gun cleaning bench.

Like jimmyraythomason, I have extensive experience with the care and operation of machinery. Retired Master Marine and Industrial Diesel Mechanic.

Clark
September 18, 2013, 10:22 AM
Here is a usenet post from 1993 [20 years ago was before there were www gun forum lists] between a math professor and a WD-40 consultant, who are tired of arguing about WD-40 in guns. The name of the thread is "WD-40 Rerun"
The moderator was and still is a professor of computer science.

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/rec.guns/v_N_1tOtC_k

rec.guns ›
WD 40 Rerun
syoung%pe...@mathcs.emory.edu 5/6/93
After seeing an astounding amount of mis-information being posted regarding WD-40, I thought it was time for a repost of this info from October of last year. Maybe whoever is writing FAQ's could include this; it certainly comes up regularly.
FWIW, I have one gun that has been subjected to a fairly harsh environment for the past 20 years. Not a hint of rust, and it still has all the bluing;
I've used WD-40 exclusively. I've also got guns I use Breakfree CLP on; both work just fine.


#[MODERATOR: Now *here* is something I wish we could get more of ... direct access to and comment from vendors that we seem to discuss a lot here.]

#I am the consultant to WD-40 Company in San Diego. About two weeks ago I was #showing their system administrator the different newsreaders available when
#they saw a message about their product harming firearms. Since they do not #currently have news on their system they asked me to post a reply. I have
#been on vacation and the original messages have expired so I can't include #them in this post. WD-40 invites your comments. You can email to their
#system administrator a...@wd40.cts.com and she will print and deliver the #message to Mr. Repaci.

X-Rap
September 18, 2013, 10:22 AM
Jimmyray, you'll smell WD40 on my guns and pretty much everything else too so your not alone. I've got enough guns that have had a steady dose of it over 30-40 yrs to know they still work fine and aren't gummed or rusted solid.
WD is just one of the things I keep around but it is by far in the greatest quantity and the longest continued use.

Schwing
September 18, 2013, 10:28 AM
Actually I am not alone,it is that TOO many have given up trying to counter such a response as I have gotten here. Do a search of THR threads on WD-40. I don't care what anyone else uses for guns or anything else. I just get SO blasted tired of a good product being trashed. I have even heard (on THR.no less) that WD-40 CAUSES rust. You would be surprised,too at how many STILL think it contains fish oil.
I can't say that I believe that it causes rust but I can certainly say it doesn't do anything to prevent it either. I also spent nearly 30 years in CNC manufacturing. While I often did use WD40 as a cleaner, I always followed up with a good lubricant. I can tell you from experience that things like gears and chains will rust up very quickly if WD40 is the only lube they get. I do believe that if you clean your guns with it regularly that you are probably not having gumming issues because a new coat will dissolve the old.

powder
September 18, 2013, 10:44 AM
This is how I use it: buy the 1 gallon can, and one of their empty spray bottles.

Pour in one half qt. synthetic gear oil, to the empty spray bottle. I use Amsoil 75-140.

Top off the spray bottle with the WD-40. Before you spray it on anything, gently shake up the bottle. (Use whatever ratio you want, w/o watering the gear lube down too much.)

The WD-40 acts as a carrier for the gear lube, and the WD eventually evaporates, while it also displaces moisture.

This is a formula I used for chain lube on my race bikes, and decided to use it on guns as well. Less than $30 gives you A LOT of lubricant, goes a LOONNNGG way.

natman
September 19, 2013, 03:32 AM
WD40 has been known to remove all lubrication. It is also a common misconception that wd40 is a lubricant... it is not. If you want to test this, take a piece of plain steel, clean it really good with wd40 and set it outside somewhere. Do the same using something like rem oil and then compare the 2 pieces of metal in a few months. The wd40 piece will be rusted, corroded, etc.

Every time WD-40 is mentioned people say the darnedest things about it.

Lubrication is not the same thing as corrosion protection.

In real life tests WD-40 is good at both.

http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/lid=10700/GunTechdetail/Gun-Cleaning-Clinic-Knowing-the-Limits-of-Rust-Preventatives

Spray some wd-40 into a clean glass bowl. Come back in an hour after all the solvents have evaporated. Examine the thin, greasy, extremely slippery film that remains and then explain how it's not a lubricant.

A lot of people swear that WD-40 gums up. All I know is that I've tried to make it happen but have been unable to do so, nor have I ever seen any real test to support that conclusion. I have seen several instances where people bought a gun with an unknown history, found it was gummed up and jumped to the conclusion that it must have been WD-40 that caused it. Now it may be that the solvents in WD-40 react with something else, but I have never seen any evidence that WD-40 applied to clean parts will gum up.

Now there are better firearms lubricants out there. WD-40 has a high percentage of solvents and I prefer to use a cleaner for cleaning and a lubricant for lubrication rather than trying to get one product to do it all.

mtrmn
September 21, 2013, 12:56 PM
I'm one of those Knuckle-dragging Neanderthals that use a lot of WD40. If I could get by with it, I'd spray it around the house for air freshener. (I have actually seen those pine-tree type air fresheners that looked like a can of WD40.)
I do not use WD40 as a primary lubricant, but I clean all my guns with it-especially the bolt carrier groups of my AR's. I then apply Mobil 1 for the final lube. Carbon just wipes away.
I DO NOT USE BREAKFREE CLP for a lube either. I have a gallon jug of it too. I can apply it to a gun and pull it from the safe 6 months later and the gun will be dry. To me, a dry gun is an unlubricated gun unless I specifically applied a dry-type lube to begin with. Since going to synthetic motor oil I chunk rocks at everything else for lube.

kyew
September 22, 2013, 10:47 AM
What I was told about it (by my mentor/gunsmithing teacher/uncle) is that it's an excellent rust remover/preventative, but used as a lube, it gums up the works eventually. Also, as bluing is basically "controlled rusting", its rust removing properties can shorten the lifespan of the finish on your blued firearms.

amd6547
September 22, 2013, 11:36 AM
WD40 works great...on my hedge clippers.
It would be the last thing I would use on my firearms, and say that as someone who used it back in the day, when it was considered lubrication big news.
Lubes have come a long way since then.
My number one choice for CLP is WeaponShield. Having been shooting a lot of corrosive ammo lately, I have been using Ballistol a lot, and it is a great all purpose lube.

Sun Tzu warrior
September 22, 2013, 11:18 PM
I am a millwright, have been for over 30 years, and use WD 40 all the time. Just not on my firearms, not saying you can't or shouldn't, I just don't.
The machines I work on, use water, and corrosive chemicals, WD 40 works great to break free rusted, corroded parts, but IMHO tends to flush out lubricants, and I always follow up with a good dose of oil, otherwise the squeeky wheel will cause me to return to the jobsite at no charge. (don't ask me how I know) AS to the question of being a rust preventative, I have no opinion.

doubleh
September 26, 2013, 06:39 PM
I did my own simple rust test one time. I cut three short piece of mild steel flat bar and cleaned one side with a grinder until there was no mill scale and the surface was bright and shiny. One piece stayed bare, one was sprayed liberally with WD-40, and the other was coated with ordinary motor oil Mobil Delvac 20-40) and laid down on the concrete apron outside my shop door. They were left alone for one week. There was no rain during that time period. At the end of one week the bare piece had light rust all over it. The WD-40 sprayed one was showing some light patches of rust while the motor oil protected one was rust free.

From that rust test I determined that WD-40 is better than nothing but oil works much better. :D I still use it quite a bit for various things but not on my guns. I'll throw in that it is also a pretty good drilling and tapping fluid but Tap Magic has it beat hands down.

I'll say this, Wd-40 has saved me a ton of work over my career removing stuck parts and once it even got me out of a huge mudhole in the road when my vehicle drowned out.

desidog
September 27, 2013, 01:29 PM
Ok, now that WD-40 has been flogged....

What happened to 3in1 Oil? I honestly haven't seen it anywhere in years, and occasionally i wander through the hardware store aimlessly...

jimmyraythomason
September 27, 2013, 01:42 PM
My mom and grandmother both kept 3in1 for their sewing machines(Granny's old treadle Singer and mom's electrics) and Dad used it to oil his whetstone. It was always there during my childhood('50s and '60s)but I haven't seen any in years but I haven't looked for it.

Teachu2
September 27, 2013, 02:05 PM
http://www.3inone.com/products/multi-purpose/

It's still out there.

Find 3-IN-ONE® Drip Oil at a Retailer near you:
•Walmart
•Home Depot
•Lowes
•Ace Hardware
•AutoZone
•Do It Best Hardware
•True Value Hardware
•Menards
•Walgreens
•Harbor Freight
•Amazon.com

Walkalong
September 27, 2013, 02:13 PM
WD-40 is a poor lubricant. When over used and not cleaned out of areas it can gum things up.

There are better products for penetrating tight tolerances, better options for dissolving crud, much better options for lubrication, and as good or better options for rust protection.

I do not even own any WD-40 anymore.

jimmyraythomason
September 27, 2013, 02:36 PM
There are better products for penetrating tight tolerances, better options for dissolving crud, much better options for lubrication, and as good or better options for rust protection.
While all of this is true(I have never experienced any gumming problems with it myself in decades of use)concerning better options the fact remains that WD-40 has served many of us very well for many years and I/we will continue to use it. No one is arguing that there aren't better options just that WD-40 will do a very decent job in all 3 categories..lubrication,corrosion prevention and penetrating oil.

GoWolfpack
September 27, 2013, 02:44 PM
When I saw the thread title I knew this would be good.

Scooter22
September 27, 2013, 04:46 PM
Heres the history of WD40. I keep a couple cans around to use on tools and automotive needs. I also use it for a quick wipe down on my guns after shooting in cold or wet weather to prevent surface rust before I have a chance for a full cleaning. G96 Complete Gun Spray is my main gun spray. Great spray cleaner and lube.

http://wd40.com/about-us/history/

X-Rap
September 27, 2013, 06:06 PM
The visual I get from WD40 threads is people with their hair on fire;)

Buzznrose
September 27, 2013, 11:11 PM
When I worked around St Mary's, MT, I was told by the local Blackfeet natives that WD-40 was excellent sprayed on bait to catch fish. I thought they were full of it, but to satisfy my curiosity, I set a trot line for burbout (fresh water cod-like bottom feeder, great eating fish!) with a dozen hooks on three consecutive nights. All hooks were baited with chunks of whitefish.

So I sprayed every other baited hook with WD-40. Three nights in a row, I caught several fish on the WD-40 tainted bait. I only caught one fish total on the unsprayed bait.

I've since used WD-40 for halibut, cod, and burbout in Alaska, sturgeon and catfish in Montana, and bass and,catfish in Delaware. Haven't used it in Texas yet but want to try it if I ever get out and do some cat fishing.

I don't use WD much for anything around the house as I prefer Ballistol, but for bait fishing, it will always have a spot in my tackle box.

jcwit
September 28, 2013, 12:17 AM
WD-40? Works GREAT for spraying on tie rod ends before dismantling and replacing with new ones.

Blanco
October 2, 2013, 10:22 PM
I don't claim to be an expert on WD-40, so take what I add with a grain of salt.
I have been working on guns for well over 30 years, I do not consider myself a gunsmith. I have worked on all my personal guns and those of friends and relatives.
I have found that wd-40 is an excellent solvent. If I remember my history WD-40 was invented by Lockheed as a solvent and water displacer for aircraft electrical and electronics.
The solvent in WD is a compound known as Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dimethyl_sulfoxide
One of it's properties is that it is absorbed through the skin directly into the blood. This could be bad in the case of guns where lead or other toxic substances could be leeched directly into the body.

My personal experience with WD-40 has mostly been negative when used as a lubricant or preservative. I have had guns that were cleaned with it begin rusting within a months time.
I will not slight those of you who use it without issue, To each their own.

I will let you in on one of my secrets. I use a homebrew better known as Ed's red. The basic ingredients are available anywhere. I think it was Popular Mechanics tested it against all the popular penetrating lubricants and it beat them all. It is a superior cleaner and lubricant to every "gun" product I have tried. It will work as a preservative but only for short term (1yr) as it will eventually evaporate over time
http://handloads.com/articles/default.asp?id=9
I will add that my version excludes acetone as this will cause condensation on metals.
Mine uses 4 basic ingredients
Valvoline universal ATF (low Odor)
odorless mineral spirits
Light weight machine oil like 3n1
d-limoline (orange oil)
I make up a gallon at a time and give the excess to friends... Who beg for more.

hentown
October 6, 2013, 07:03 PM
I feel like I just woke up in the middle of a bad dream about WD-40 cults. ;) In my humble opinion, it's not the best solvent. Also, in my opinion, 3-in-1 oil is just about worthless as a firearms lubricant.

XD 45acp
October 6, 2013, 11:17 PM
Been using 3N1 on my Trap shotgun since 1964. Have shot it in ALL weather conditions and have NO rust. My Winchester looks just like the day I bought it at The "64 Grand American. Now, just remember, it is a full true blue oil, which means it will collect dirt probably alot faster than the new lubes of today. So, regular cleaning is important if you shoot alot ( me, about 500 rnds + per week ). I apply it as thin as possible. Tried and true is ok, but technology has come a LONG way since '64. Guess I shouldn't be so hard headed.

denpython
November 3, 2013, 12:44 AM
back in the good ol' days I recall a story of the WD40 craze inspiring some to use it for fish frying at camping trips.....

doubleh
November 3, 2013, 11:12 AM
OK, one more WD-40 use. My wife's old aunt developed arthritis in one of her knees when she was in her late 60s. She rubbed it with WD-40 to relieve the pain. I made the mistake of jokingly telling her that all it did was make her smell like WD-40. She in turn and quite explicitly told me it DID stop her knee from hurting and if I gave her anymore guff about using it she would whip me with the can. :D

I guess it did work. She lived to be 93 years old and was still getting around on that arthritic knee.

cocon
November 4, 2013, 07:42 PM
I have used WD40 for years, I used it on my guns for a while but stopped when I got to know Jhon Harrison the Birminghan gun maker. ( He mostly made guns for Holland and Holland and other firms as an outworker). He explained about WD 40 being a penertrating oil and you do not want it soaking into your gun stock. It is fine for de watering but should be wiped off after. If a gun gets soaked with water, it should be disasembled <deleted> and allowed to dry out while the metal work is de watered and dried out. Then oil and reasemble. I try not to go shooting in the rain but sometimes it rains as you are out shooting, most inconvenient.

stressed
November 5, 2013, 01:09 AM
Silicone lubricant is a far better option then WD40, costs the same and can be picked up in the same isle.

I remember in Iraq locals using motor oil to lube their AK's, worked quite well. Smelled like a car burning oil after a few magazines in rapid succession. In an oil rich country though, why not.

I just use what is mean for firearms. CLP or dry lube.

788Ham
November 5, 2013, 10:48 PM
Spray it on your boat prop and housing before putting the boat and motor away for the winter, no water on anything come spring!

dsm
November 6, 2013, 12:28 PM
Its an excellent fluid to use in milling, drilling and tapping aluminum.

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