Finding a NIB Hi-Power: Easier Said Than Done


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Tecolote
September 19, 2013, 05:41 PM
I've been on a quest for a NIB Browning Hi-Power at a reasonable price, but so far nada! I found one at a local sporting chain but they wanted $899.99 plus tax. For kicks I asked to see it. The surly sales guy pulled out the mag, sling shot the slide on an empty chamber, tried and tried to fire it without a mag, worked the slide again and again letting it fly on an empty chamber each time, slammed in the mag, fired it and finally handed it to me. Sorry, but for a grand I would prefer something that hasn't been treated worse than a urinal at Oktoberfest.

When did NIB Hi-Powers get so darn pricey?

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tarosean
September 19, 2013, 07:38 PM
You gotta pay to play for a NIB one... They have been more expensive then others for as long as I can remember.

sirgilligan
September 19, 2013, 07:46 PM
Last year some NIB on Gallery Of Guns / Gun Genie were around $700 for a while, it was the 75th Anniversary models that hadn't sold if I recall correctly.

The price also depends on the model.
My blued with walnut grips and adjustable sights was around $850.
My blued with walnut grips and fixed sights was around $825.

HOOfan_1
September 19, 2013, 08:28 PM
When did NIB Hi-Powers get so darn pricey?

Anything with Browning's name on the side carries about a 5% "look I bought a Browning" fee. Then there is the fact that they are pretty complicated, all steel guns, which don't sell enough to bring the price down.

tomrkba
September 19, 2013, 09:55 PM
There was a NIB Browning Hi-Power MK III in 9mm at my LGS a month or so ago. It was priced at $950. I remember buying a pair of BHP 40's for $600-650 each in the late 90's. It's too bad.

Outlaw Man
September 20, 2013, 12:15 AM
I paid $25 for mine.






I won it in a raffle. :D

Honestly, having both a real Browning and an FEG, I'd pass on the Browning at any price close to $900. My $300 FEG (that, honestly, I've put a lot of time and work into...and bought twice - long story) shoots pretty much just as good and is just as reliable. I might pick up a used Browning if the price was right, though.

wow6599
September 20, 2013, 12:16 AM
Last year some NIB on Gallery Of Guns / Gun Genie were around $700 for a while, it was the 75th Anniversary models that hadn't sold if I recall correctly.

I bought one from them about 18 months ago for about $750.
I get it that some folks don't like the "anniversary" type firearms, but I thought it was down-played and looks nice.

txgunsuscg
September 20, 2013, 08:03 AM
They've always been pricey, at least as long as I've been looking. I look for used ones now, like the Israeli imports, or guys getting rid of theirs because they don't use them.

JTQ
September 20, 2013, 09:12 AM
I agree with many of the above posters, they have always been expensive. The only new ones that I've seen in the past decade+ that seemed like bargains to me were a bunch of Hi-Power's that came in with FN roll marks several years back for around $450. The were very good looking, but all were equipped with the SFS system. I passed at the time, but of course with 20/20 hindsight, I should have picked up a couple of them.

PS
I also saw some odd, camo finished Hi-Power's a few years back. They were priced attractively around $600, but then, I didn't want a camo finished Hi-Power either.

JTQ
September 20, 2013, 09:21 AM
The other thing that has already been mentioned is the general cost of metal framed guns.

We've lived with polymer guns for so long, I think many of us forget that building a gun with a metal frame is more costly than the polymer framed guns.

We all think of $1,000+ Colt 1911's and costly SIG's and think that's just because Colt and SIG are price gouging on their name alone. It is more likely that they cost more to make than their Glock, and M&P competition because of the materials.

In the 1980's, I bought a Colt Combat Elite and an S&W 4506. They essentially cost the same. If S&W were still selling their metal framed auto's, they'd probably cost around $1,000 (same ballpark as the Hi-Power) rather than in the $500 - $600 range of all the polymer pistols people have become used to buying.

bainter1212
September 20, 2013, 09:26 AM
AIM just sold off a batch of imported alloy framed surplus HPs a few weeks back....the guns looked well used. These would have been prime candidates for some custom work done by a good 'smith.

A used gun that has some work done to it (new barrel, springs, smooth & tune for reliability, trigger job, metal refinish etc) is just as good as a NIB pistol (IMHO) and you may even get a gun that turns out to be more accurate than a new one.

YMMV

SFsc616171
September 24, 2013, 12:53 PM
As far as being pricey, BHP's are one of the few pistols that have been in production, almost as long as the 1911. (1911 - 1935). Remember, it has been the pistol, in most of the places that the 1911 hasn't!

When I bought what folks on this board have called 'fugly', digi-camo MKIII, I paid $949.00.

You are looking at one of the original top guns, in the world of steel guns.

I knew it was pricey, when I looked in the catalogue at the LGS, but it is the quality of the piece, and, you cannot find many autoloaders that have as part of the original design specs, to put rounds inside of a coffee cup at 64.5 yds, and still down an opponent.

Gary A
September 25, 2013, 10:56 AM
I primarily like single action revolvers but in the past couple of years I came across a new 75th Ann Hi Power at my LGS and bought it. Sometime later they had an epoxy finished Mk III that they had special ordered for someone who did not come through and buy it. I bought it also. I'm probably done buying Hi Powers now. Were they expensive relative to other firearms that would do the same thing? Yes, they were. Am I wealthy? No, I'm not. I figuredf I'm going to have one nice 9mm pistol, why not a classic? Then I figured, if I'm going to have two nice 9mm pistols, why not two classics?

I am no gun expert but handling a Hi Power is a noticeably different experience than handling most pistols. It is truly an elegant pistol.

I doubt they would be hard to sell should I ever want to do so.

I don't regret buying them.

Pilot
September 25, 2013, 12:41 PM
Anything with Browning's name on the side carries about a 5% "look I bought a Browning" fee. Then there is the fact that they are pretty complicated, all steel guns, which don't sell enough to bring the price down.
How are Browning Hi Powers complicated? They are a more simple design than a 1911 which IMHO is not complicated at all.

The BHP is expensive because it is worth it. Yes, it has become almost a boutique gun, but used ones are out there at decent prices if you look.

HOOfan_1
September 25, 2013, 02:04 PM
How are Browning Hi Powers complicated? They are a more simple design than a 1911 which IMHO is not complicated at all.

Compared to modern polymer designs, they are complicated.

No injection molded frames. No easy slip in fire control groups. More hand fitting, and more care of assembly required.

dogtown tom
September 25, 2013, 03:46 PM
HOOfan_1 Quote:
Originally Posted by Pilot
How are Browning Hi Powers complicated? They are a more simple design than a 1911 which IMHO is not complicated at all.

Compared to modern polymer designs, they are complicated.
Absolute nonsense.

The HP is one of the least complicated handguns ever. No one is saying its easier to work on than a Glock, but it's definitely less complicated than Sigs or Berettas.

HOOfan_1
September 25, 2013, 04:32 PM
HUGE Edit: cut out a bunch of superfluous mess

Ok, I understand the Hi-Power is not a complicated gun.

But isn't it more complicated to produce from raw material to finished product than cheaper polymer guns?
Isn't it more complicated to forge and mill a steel frame versus injection molding a polymer frame.

The 1911, Metal SIGs and Berettas are not cheap guns either, unless produced in borderline third world countries.

If we want to compare the Hi-Power to something that costs a lot less, made of similar materials and is probably just as complicated to assemble, what about the CZ-75

pittspilot
September 25, 2013, 11:39 PM
I am so happy I picked a CDNN FN Hi-power when those things were $399. I don't think I could bring myself to pay $950 for one.

SFsc616171
September 26, 2013, 06:53 PM
I looked on GunsAmerica today, 092613 at 1651 CDT, and found this:

http://www.gunsamerica.com/999238984/Browning_Hi_Power_MK_III_9mm_Semi_Auto_Pistol_Ne.htm

I don't know if that is your forecasted price range, but that is near what I paid for mine brand new two years ago.

Good Luck!

Fremmer
September 26, 2013, 09:41 PM
Yup you're just gonna have to pay more, and Brownings ain't cheap. Their hunting rifles can get expensive, too, especially the semi autos. Iirc, their shotguns are pricey, too.

See why I stick with the buckmark?!? Lol

rick melear
September 26, 2013, 09:45 PM
I have two, a T series and a Mark III. Neither is for sale. Yes there not cheap but both mirror old world craftsmanship.

RetiredUSNChief
September 26, 2013, 10:17 PM
*sigh*

There was a neighbor down the block where I grew up that had a High Power that he brought home after WWII. I told him long ago that if he should ever think of selling it, to get ahold of me though my parents (I was in the Navy at the time) and I'd be happy to cut a deal with him for it.

Met up with him several years later...and he had sold it.

*sigh*

I thought I was gonna have me a nice, fully functional WWII era Hi-Power. Ah, well...can't have everything I guess.

:(

hso
September 26, 2013, 10:22 PM
But isn't it more complicated to produce from raw material to finished product than cheaper polymer guns?

Think about the steps involved with making the mold and the injection equipment for a poly vs. a steel frame being able to be machined with standard shop equipment.

It is very easy to forget about the steps needed to start with raw material and go to finished product when you're discussing poly vs. steel.

HOOfan_1
September 26, 2013, 10:48 PM
Think about the steps involved with making the mold and the injection equipment for a poly vs. a steel frame being able to be machined with standard shop equipment.


Seems to me that initial specialization cost is offset by volume of production.

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