Buckshot tested @ 50 yards (video)


PDA






The_Next_Generation
September 23, 2013, 05:09 AM
Hey all,

This is a pretty interesting video detailing the effectiveness and performance of #4, 00, and 000 buckshot at a range of 50 yards.

Hope you guys enjoy this as much as I did:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_pIuUrjUIyQ

- TNG

Edit: Here is the full description of the video from Brass Fetcher:

Ballistic gelatin test results of Buckshot at 50 yards distance.

Tested ammunition was:

12 Gauge Federal #4 Buckshot 27 pellet (F127 4B) 2 3/4"
12 Gauge Federal Tactical 00 Buckshot 9 pellet (LE132 00) 2 3/4"
12 Gauge Hevi-Shot 00 Buckshot Dead Coyote 9 pellet (42209) 2 3/4"
12 Gauge Hornady Critical Defense 00 Buckshot 8 pellet (86240) 2 3/4"
12 Gauge Remington Express 000 Buckshot 8 pellet (12B000) 2 3/4"

Shot from a Mossberg 500 12 gauge shotgun with 20" barrel length and full choke.

Very special thanks to RW for facilitating this test.

If you enjoyed reading about "Buckshot tested @ 50 yards (video)" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
336A
September 23, 2013, 05:53 AM
I seen this too, the link was posted elsewhere. It reinforces a very non scientific test that me and some buddies did on a makeshift live fire range in Kosovo back in 2001. I have never said anything about it before as I'd surely be flamed and called a liar by the internet commandos. Anyway we had some extra 00 Buckshot (military issue) and of course our issued Mossberg 500's with us. We were wondering if we could hit and make the 50m pop up target that we use for our qual range move. We were all in total disbelief as one of our partners took aim, heck I was thinking that the spread would be way to great with the crappy issue buckshot. Sure enough even with the cheap military issue buckshot when our buddy pulled the trigger that 50m target went down, and it did so with boring regularity.

I knew that we were just getting lucky with only one or two pellets hitting the target, but it made us a believer that it could certainly be lethal at that distance. With todays buckshot loads such as the Federal flight control loads, this test don't surprise me one bit.

Fred Fuller
September 23, 2013, 09:33 AM
Thanks for posting this - I'd missed seeing it so far.

A word for newer members - we strongly discourage posting naked links here, especially video links. Please include either the posted description, or your own words describing the video as was done in the OP here. Attribution is a good idea also, if possible.

The posted description is refusing to load fully for me, but here's what I could get at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_pIuUrjUIyQ

Is buckshot lethal at 50 yards?

Brass Fetcher·193 videos
Subscribe 8,920
13,284
193 5
Like About Share Add to
Published on Sep 15, 2013
Ballistic gelatin test results of Buckshot at 50 yards distance.

Tested ammunition was:

This one is from our old friend Brass Fetcher - he has a page at http://www.brassfetcher.com/ with a good bit more testing, including shotgun stuff.

I do want to emphasize yet again - with shotgun loads featuring newer pattern control wads (FliteControl etc), as far as choke is concerned, less is generally more. In other words, these wads are designed to work with open chokes, and the tighter you go beyond CYL the more open your patterns with them are likely to be. It may sound counterintuitive, but my experience and that of others indicates this to be the case as a general rule (there are few absolute certainties where shotgun patterns are concerned).

With 'standard' buckshot loads, more choke generally leads to tighter patterns. What this means is, once again, there is no substitute for patterning the load you plan to use in your shotgun, period. There's an unavoidable certainty for you, if you're an absolutist who doesn't like my constant hedging re. shotgun patterns :D.

I'm really glad to see this test, I do wish the results were made a bit more clear as far as what load/shot size produced what penetration results however... that may have been included in the descriptive matter which refused to load for me. John goes to a LOT of work and expense to conduct these tests, and I for one certainly appreciate it.

The_Next_Generation
September 23, 2013, 12:06 PM
Here is the full description detailing the gun and specific ammunition used:

Ballistic gelatin test results of Buckshot at 50 yards distance.

Tested ammunition was:

12 Gauge Federal #4 Buckshot 27 pellet (F127 4B) 2 3/4"
12 Gauge Federal Tactical 00 Buckshot 9 pellet (LE132 00) 2 3/4"
12 Gauge Hevi-Shot 00 Buckshot Dead Coyote 9 pellet (42209) 2 3/4"
12 Gauge Hornady Critical Defense 00 Buckshot 8 pellet (86240) 2 3/4"
12 Gauge Remington Express 000 Buckshot 8 pellet (12B000) 2 3/4"

Shot from a Mossberg 500 12 gauge shotgun with 20" barrel length and full choke.

Very special thanks to RW for facilitating this test.

Arizona_Mike
September 23, 2013, 04:13 PM
Great post. Hevi shot is only sightly denser than lead (12 vs. 11.1). It is not "tungsten" but has some in it. I think it's hardness resists deformation which helps with drag, pattern, and penetration.

I have been unable to find a good 3" 00 hevi shot load. Dead coyote has only 12 00 pellets (1 5/8 oz), so I'll stick to 15 plated pellet super X as my primary defensive load (1 7/8 oz). 15 Hevi shot pellets would only weigh 2 oz and that is a common #4 buck load so it should not be a problem.

I'd love to see a range vs. depth test for #4 buck.

Mike

Jim Watson
September 23, 2013, 05:12 PM
We have a bit of a dichotomy here.

He talks about a "50 yard perimeter" and "increased hit probability."
OK, if you are guarding a post against insurrectionists or such. One or a few buckshot can be deadly, disabling, or at least discouraging. And you don't care where the rest of the spread goes. Heck, you might get another intruder on the same shot.

But in a home defense or civil police setting, we are told that we are liable for every bullet or pellet. That choke should be tight and range should be limited so we put the whole pattern on the assailant with nothing flying on to cause collateral damage. That is where the common 20-25 yard number comes from.
That gets you a lot of "stopping power" with multiple simultaneous hits, but no "increased hit probability," you still have to aim and it doesn't take much to miss.

I think that is behind the increasing number of carbines and "patrol rifles" in use. More shots on hand, less recoil, better accuracy, and even longer range if needed.
Also more reliable. Our little club has started running 3-gun matches. Some of the guys are dismayed over the lesser reliability of their shotguns versus rifles and pistols.

nathan
September 24, 2013, 01:05 AM
You can t go wrong with slugs and buckshots in 12 gauge. They affordable and widely available especially in these times.

bullseyebob47
September 24, 2013, 01:59 AM
lesser reliability of their shotguns? what kind of shotguns?

Jim Watson
September 24, 2013, 11:35 AM
Everything from a real Winchester 1897 on up to the LnG* Mossberg and Remington.

Although I think the only problem with the 97 was the operator got in a hurry and double shucked it, ejecting a round he was going to need.

I read people talking about buying a Mossberg or Remington and sending it right out to be welded up and ground away.

*That's Latest and Greatest.

Fred Fuller
September 24, 2013, 11:36 AM
I saw a lot of people having difficulty with gas guns back when I was playing with 3-gun, they'd take a the cheapest used 28" Rem 1100 they could find and whack ten inches off the barrel and then couldn't figure out why it wouldn't run with the light loads they wanted to use in 3-gun. Then people started drilling out gas ports on those bobbed barrels, and that led to battering the actions when they used full house buckshot and slugs. It was a bad time to be an 1100 in those days.

People who don't shoot pumpguns under any kind of pressure tend to get over-excited and short stroke them to a surprising degree. That makes the gun look unreliable, because EVERYONE knows it isn't the shooter's fault.

Yep. Shotguns are surprisingly unreliable... :D

bullseyebob47
September 24, 2013, 12:22 PM
i hunted with pump shotguns for 30 years. guess that makes a difference. mossberg 500 works best for me. i remember short stroking it once while duck hunting. it just didn't chamber the next round. no jams. i say focus on slamming that pump back like you mean it rather than trying to shoot so fast.

i used my 500 as a paddle then shoot with duck weed coming out the action with the empty shell. i dropped it in the muddy river sand on a hunting trip once. i could feel the sand grinding away while shooting/pumping. by the end of the hunt, the 500 worked smooth again.

sometimes i see 500s for around $100 at pawn shops during off season and i pick them up. its unbelievable the amount of gunk in those guns, but they still work even if some are a little stiff before cleaning.

i whacked off 10 inches and put a stock shell holder on two of them. i keep one in my truck(federal flite control) and would defiantly go for that if possible before my pistol.

If you enjoyed reading about "Buckshot tested @ 50 yards (video)" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!