Henry .357 Lever Action


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460Kodiak
September 30, 2013, 05:07 PM
Greetings friends and neighbors,

Say, I've been thinking about a lever action in .357 for awhile, and I really like the look of the Henry Big Boy lever guns. I was out shoping around the other day, and happened to come across one.

I like that it is affordable to shoot, affordable to own, and chambered in a cartridge that you could easily plug a deer with.

I'm also really infatuated with the fine wood stock, and especially the brass reciever and butt plate. My question is for Henry owners.

How durable is the finish on the brass recievers? Is it easy to damage. Does it hold up to regular range sessions? I typically lean towards stainless steel for the look and durability.

If you own one, do you have any regrets? Would you buy one?

I have 3 .357 revolvers so I like the notion.

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Schwing
September 30, 2013, 05:17 PM
I almost ended up with a Henry. I had my local dealer on the lookout for a .357 lever action for a long time and he could never get a Henry in. One day, he got a Rossi 92 and I, very half-heartedly took a look at it. I had no experience with them and had heard some negative posts.

It was stainless with a walnut stock and won me over right away. I have since handled some Henrys. I think the action is somewhat smoother out of the box but, after a couple of hundred rounds, the Rossi smoothed right up. I had some minor issues with the feed tube coming lose initially but they were easily resolved.

I would do it again.

scotjute
September 30, 2013, 11:33 PM
I have one. The finish of the brass receiver seems to have held up fine. I've only shot around 30 rounds thru it, so not exactly a heavy duty range session.
I wish the gun was about 1-2 lbs. lighter.
Thought their .22 WMR version was a near perfect rifle.

mefitz
September 30, 2013, 11:46 PM
I have had mine for about 3 years now and absolutely love it. Taken to range dozens of times, finish holds up really well. I'm not especially hard on my guns, but dont baby them either.
The action is like butter! So smooth and reliable. They weigh about eight pounds so your loads can be stout with reasonable recoil. They do like a certain bullet and OAL combinations like most lever actions. Mine happens to like a 158gr semi-wad cutter at a certain OAL.
Would I buy another? yes! any regrets? No! Simple as that. In fact, I bought the .22 Golden Boy not long after. Do yourself a favor and pick one up!

Geno
October 1, 2013, 12:17 AM
Henry advertises the brass receiver to have the same strength as the steel receivers.

Geno

jakk280rem
October 1, 2013, 12:35 AM
Is it a brass "finish" or brass? Is it like their painted receiver 22's with a plated steel receiver? I thought it was solid brass in which case it should hold up nicely.

scotjute
October 1, 2013, 12:45 AM
It is a solid brass receiver.

Panzercat
October 1, 2013, 01:58 AM
No sidegate :(

Eb1
October 1, 2013, 02:28 AM
Not being able to side load is a downfall. Same with the .44 Magnum version. :(

ArchAngelCD
October 1, 2013, 04:50 AM
I own a Marlin 1894C in .357 Magnum and a Henry in .22LR. The Henry has an extremely smooth lever and it's very accurate. The Marlin in .357 Magnum is one of the most fun guns I have. I like carrying it in the woods along with either a Ruger SA revolver or a S&W DA revolver in the same caliber.

Carl N. Brown
October 1, 2013, 06:40 AM
To some people, loading a tube magazine through a port in the tube implies ".22" and "cheap" (much like bolt actions w/o a seperate bolt stop -- just open the bolt pull the trigger and slide the bolt out -- implies ".22" and "cheap".

We expect a centerfire leveraction to have a side gate for loading, then we complain about shaved bullets, thumbs and fingers from pushing cartridges through the side gate, and how difficult it is to clean the magazine tube after a few years of oxidized oil, bullet shaving, bullet lube, powder residue.

All gun designs are trade-offs. Some people grow to like the Henry loading system, or are used to the same system in the .22s they grew up with.

And on the weight of a Henry: I sold my Rossi Puma .357 to my son, and he gave it back to me be cause light carbine + 158gr .357 was too much felt recoil: he'd rather shoot his .308 or .30-30. Weight reduces felt recoil because increased mass reduces velocity of recoil: in the e = m v2 equation for kinetic energy, reduction in velocity reduces impact energy much more than the increase in mass that reduces the velocity incleases the impact. Heavier guns kick less with the same round.

460Kodiak
October 1, 2013, 12:33 PM
I would prefer a sidegate, but it certainly isn't a deal breaker to me.

The weight doesn't bother me. I'm a bigger guy and am pretty strong. I don't see it being a problem.

goon
October 2, 2013, 04:42 PM
When I handled the Henry in .357, I noticed that it had a stock that fit me pretty well. The Golden Boy .22's have too much drop but the bigger version lined up perfectly for me. I wish they'd make a more subdued color case hardened version, but I think if I was in the market and couldn't find a good used Marlin, I'd probably buy the Henry.

KYamateur
October 2, 2013, 07:17 PM
I bought a Marlin and like it fine, but my shooting buddy bought the Henry and I like his a little better. It is actually easier to load from the tube. I don't know if one is better than the other, the Henry is just prettier. Neither of us have ever had any problems. We have both probably shot 800-1000 rounds out of the rifles. We bought them at the same time. No wear issues on either gun. Just hold them and see what ou like the best.

skeptical_in_Ohio
November 21, 2013, 05:57 PM
Hi all-

I have been sort of casting about for a centerfire lever-action rifle. From what I've heard I think Marlin (if one can find an older one) or Henry would make me happy. Rossi's are OK, there has been documentation of some variance in feeding, and that doggone safety switch on the bolt is a real turn-off for me. At any rate, those are getting rare and prices are generally in the low to mid $500 range.

I'd like something in .357, but I guess .44 would be OK too (I have something else in both calibers). When looking at Henry or Marlin, what I am finding is that 30/30 (at least Marlins and Winchesters) can be gotten in a lot of places (indeed, saw a Marlin at WalMart today for under $400); the .44's I've seen tend to be in the high $600 range, and the .357 more in the mid $700. The 30/30 Henry's are priced a lot like the .357 Henry's. I don't have anything else in 30/30, but it would meet the nominal requirement of centerfire, so I'm open to that idea.

My question. Are these prices normal, or is something going on that I'm missing? Would a Henry (used, but looks really great) in .357 be a good buy at a bit under $700, or should I wait until things get a bit more reasonable, or is this about as reasonable as things get? There's no fire - it'd just something I'd like that would be fun to shoot.

Please advise.

Thanks.

Nighteyes
November 21, 2013, 06:22 PM
...

Nighteyes
November 21, 2013, 06:24 PM
To some people, loading a tube magazine through a port in the tube implies ".22" and "cheap" (much like bolt actions w/o a seperate bolt stop -- just open the bolt pull the trigger and slide the bolt out -- implies ".22" and "cheap".
Then, just perhaps, one has never handled/fired an original 1860 Henry rifle, or any of the modern 1860 Henry reproductions. (Trust me on this, a "Henry Big Boy" is by no means a reproduction of the original Henry rifle.)

I'm just sayin'...

-- Nighteyes

jakk280rem
November 21, 2013, 06:26 PM
Prices are pretty normal. The 1894 has been out of production for several years. That is why the prices are increasing. An expanding demand and shrinking supply drive the price up. Is an almost $700 Marlin in 357 worth it? I don't know, is it? If you plan on keeping forever then what's it matter what you pay? 20 years from now will you even remember? I own a pre Remington 1894C with Ballard rifling and a checkered Walnut stock of some figure. I happily paid $400 about 4 years ago. Would I pay $700 today for the same gun? I might. It really is a fine rifle.

The other problem with waiting for Remlin to start up production again is the fact it has taken several years for the New Yorkers to learn to turn out a decent lever action. They've had some practice on the 336 and 1895, but it might take a few more to get the 1894 right. The good news is, once 1894 production is up to speed, older Marlin will slowly drop in price. If you want a 357 lever rifle, my advise is patience. Look for an older Marlin or Winchester that is in the condition you want at a price you are happy with and then buy it. If this takes a few years then so be it. By then Marlington will have the 1894 mostly sorted out and you can just buy a new one.

CaliCoastie
November 23, 2013, 02:07 AM
my biggest beef is that Henry call reference to the original Henry rifle(even though Winchester has more reason). as such, i personaly won't own one, i like what i hear about them, a friend of mines Henry 22 shots right in line with my Malin mountie.
i based on my opinions would look toward rossi.

ArchAngelCD
November 23, 2013, 05:54 AM
my biggest beef is that Henry call reference to the original Henry rifle(even though Winchester has more reason). as such, i personaly won't own one, i like what i hear about them, a friend of mines Henry 22 shots right in line with my Malin mountie.
i based on my opinions would look toward rossi.
I have no connection with the Henry company and I only currently own one of their rifles.

The current Henry Repeating Arms company can trace it's linage back to the original Henry plant in New Haven, CT. They are a family owned company who makes their guns in America with American parts. They donate to the NRA, Boy Scouts of America, The Fisher House and many many others. They raise funds for Breast Cancer research, the Boy Scouts, Teen Shooting Clubs, Farmers, Storm Victims, Ronald McDonald House and a whole lot more! IMO not supporting a good company like Henry over some perceived problem of connecting to the original 1860 rifle is not a good thing. (again, IMO)

I will support an American company who supports America before I will spend my money with any other company who sends their profits elsewhere. (in this case Brazil) I have nothing against Rossi but if I had to choose I would buy a Henry.

shafter
November 23, 2013, 10:40 AM
Rather than go with Henry, I think I'd go with a Uberti Yellowboy if I had the option. Much more historical looking and still has the brass which I would allow to tarnish if it were mine.

The current Henry Repeating Arms company can trace it's linage back to the original Henry plant in New Haven, CT.

The current Henry company has no connection whatsoever with the original company and their advertisements are blatantly misleading IMO.

TheHappyGunner
November 23, 2013, 12:32 PM
Despite what some try to tell you, the modern Henry rifles hold no lineage with the original Henry rifles. I'm all for supporting American companies, but when the American companies are producing guns like the Henrys, I will send my business elsewhere. I don't believe in spending $900 on a sin-ugly gun that lies about itself just because it's made in the USA. But that's just me..

Seriously consider a Rossi 92, or maybe even a Uberti replica of the 1873 Winchesters. Both are offered in .357 Mag

tcj
November 23, 2013, 12:45 PM
Love the look & out-of-the-box trigger feel on the Henry's...but bought a Rossi 92 (24" octagon, 357) instead because I really wanted the side gate for loading...just a personal preference.

After about 300 rounds the Rossi has smoothed out nicely and 38's run as fast as I can cycle it. 357's run a little slower but that's because I'm still getting a feel for cycling them.

So far I love the Rossi and have done nothing to it other than push lead down range.

Accuracy was dead-on out of the box.

Nighteyes
November 23, 2013, 04:20 PM
...

Nighteyes
November 23, 2013, 04:23 PM
Rather than go with Henry, I think I'd go with a Uberti Yellowboy if I had the option. Much more historical looking and still has the brass which I would allow to tarnish if it were mine.

Like this? ;) :D

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a124/danielnighteyes/CAS%20Guns%20etc/2013-06-17102852_zpsa9692d7a.jpg (http://s10.photobucket.com/user/danielnighteyes/media/CAS%20Guns%20etc/2013-06-17102852_zpsa9692d7a.jpg.html)

jim in Anchorage
November 23, 2013, 04:40 PM
The current Henry Repeating Arms company can trace it's linage back to the original Henry plant in New Haven, CT.
Do you have a link for that or any evidence to prove it? If true it would require me to revise Every thing I thought I knew about the history of Winchester.

george d dennis
November 23, 2013, 05:01 PM
Did a search, Looks like New Haven ct. Typed in Henry Rifles

jim in Anchorage
November 23, 2013, 05:45 PM
george d dennis Did a search, Looks like New Haven ct. Typed in Henry Rifles
Is that directed to me? what are you getting at?

george d dennis
November 23, 2013, 08:51 PM
Not you Jim, Liked to look up the history myself as i was reading through
the topics. I didnt live far from Winchester a few years ago , But never was inside. Theres alot of Firearms history in Connecticut , But im afraid its
mostly all gone now.

Milkmaster
November 23, 2013, 11:59 PM
Why not buy the newly released Winchester 1873 that comes in 1873? I am hopeful to see one soon. I have not been able to find a specimen yet. The list price is a bit steep, but I would bet the fit and finish will be nice. Miroku tends to build a nice rifle if my Browning firearms are any indication.

BTW... I don't mind the tube magazine on the Henry. My 22WMR Golden Boy loads really fast with my speedloader. I can pull the tube and dump the full dozen rounds in less than a minute.

jim in Anchorage
November 24, 2013, 12:14 AM
Not you Jim, Liked to look up the history myself as i was reading through
the topics. I didnt live far from Winchester a few years ago , But never was inside. Theres alot of Firearms history in Connecticut , But im afraid its
mostly all gone now.
You should go to the Connecticut library museum then. fantastic collection. I would far rather go there than Disney world.

conrad427
November 24, 2013, 12:33 AM
I bought a Henry for my dad a while back to match the one my mother won in a raffle. I have no complaints with either. I could care less what others think about the marketing, I like the company.
I would love to find a Henry Big Boy in any caliber. I like the front load feature. A person can shoot something different than the Marlin or Rossi, both of which I like.

2fewdaysafield
November 24, 2013, 03:30 PM
I own both a Henry .357 and a brass receiver LSI/Rossi Puma .357. Both are good guns.

The Henry is Made in the USA....I like that.

The Henry is heavy at 8.75 lbs with a 20" barrel. It's certainly not a lightweight carry all day gun, but that weight does make it a kitten in the recoil department. Action is super-smooth and the trigger was a crisp 3.25 lbs right out of the box. The lack of loading gate doesn't mean anything to me one way or the other. All HRA Henry rifles come with a lifetime warranty whether you are the 1st or 21st owner. They have the best customer service in the firearms business.

The Rossi has a 24" barrel (as opposed to the Henry 20" barrel) and weighs a bit less. Haven't actually weighed it on a proper scale. The trigger and action on this gun were at best heavy and rough out of the box. An action job fixed that and brought the price of the gun to about the same as the Henry. The action is not as slick as the Henry, but it's close. The trigger is now darn near as good as the Henry.

The Rossi has that annoying safety. Just out of place on a levergun. It can be replaced with a peep sight for about $60. Well worth it if your eyes are getting a little older. Helps the esthetics too.

To summarize my feelings on both guns.....

New out of the box, the Henry has a better action and trigger. And it is more expensive. The Rossi is less expensive, but to get it to run as nice as the Henry will make them about the same price.

The loading gate/no loading gate thing means a lot to some. It means nothing to me.

Some people get their panties all in a twist about HRA using the Henry name without proving that they have some sort of connection to the original Henry rifle. I say WHO CARES? It's a rifle, not a "collectors item".

I use both very happily. If I had to pick only one, I'd probably go with the Henry because they are Made in the USA and for their excellent customer service. But as far as I am concerned they are both good rifles.

CaliCoastie
November 24, 2013, 04:30 PM
actually i have no objections to them using the Henry name, the fact they deliberately mislead people on their history.
that they mislead is easy to prove, look up Benjamin Tyler Henry, you will find he ended up working for Winchester.
that being said they seen to make quality guns if a bit heavy.

2fewdaysafield
November 24, 2013, 10:27 PM
And who is to know that the Imperato family is not somehow related to Benjamin T Henry or for that matter Oliver Winchester? Has anybody done a DNA test?

And yeah....they do make good rifles.

Marketing is marketing. If the Imperato family were direct descendents of Benjamin T Henry and made crappy rifles I'd say they were junk and that the connection didn't matter. Instead they may or may not be somehow related to Benjamin T Henry and they make good rifles and the connection or lack thereof still doesn't matter.

They make excellent rimfire rifles also.

shafter
November 24, 2013, 10:40 PM
Some people get their panties all in a twist about HRA using the Henry name without proving that they have some sort of connection to the original Henry rifle. I say WHO CARES? It's a rifle, not a "collectors item".


They can use the name all they like, doesn't bother me a bit. What does bother me is blatant lies. They know lots of people associate the name Henry with that cool old Civil War repeater and now they're trying to cash in on it by lying.

2fewdaysafield
November 24, 2013, 11:12 PM
As I said above....

1) Who knows if they are actually related to Benjamin T. Henry? Have you seen the results of a DNA test to prove it one way or the other?

2) It's marketing. If you get all upset about marketing that is less than 100% true you will have a very pained life.

3) The rifles they make are good so who gives a hoot about the marketing? A quality rifle is a quality rifle. The rest is all BS.

I mean He!!.....Todays Winchester has NOTHING to do with the real Winchester. All Browning did was buy the name out of bankruptcy court. Does that mean we should have nothing to do with the current Winchester rifles.

All I give a ship about is whether a company makes good rifles or not. Henry does.

jim in Anchorage
November 24, 2013, 11:43 PM
Actually Smith and Wesson [yes that S&W of handgun fame] had far more to do with the henry rifle than Henry did. The modern Henry rifle company has no more claim to the original Then I would if I started making glass bodied cars with tube frames and OHV V-8s and called them Packard's

I find it entertaining that people complain the Henry repo's have no side loading gate. THATS why it's a Henry and not a Kings improvement Model 1866..

skeptical_in_Ohio
November 25, 2013, 01:01 AM
Hi all-

I just picked up a Henry chambered in 22 Mag used this weekend. The Henry I bought is a very pretty rifle; the wood finish is gorgeous, the wood/metal fit is amazing, the bluing is deep and rich, and the octagonal barrel is well-finished. The receiver is coated with some sort of pretty durable-looking black finish. It also shoots very well and the action is butter-smooth.

To the point of lineage, I see the branding/history thing this way (if anybody is interested). A few years ago I was in Seattle for work and went to the Boeing Museum. I was stunned by one thing - the Gemini Spacecraft (which were built by McDonnell-Douglas) were listed as the "Boeing" Gemini Spacecraft. Also, the F15 (again built by McDonnell-Douglas) is now identified as the "Boeing" F15. After my initial confusion, it made sense - since Boeing bought McDonnell-Douglas (and its name and associated intellectual property), it's now Boeing if that's what the owner wants.

In this light, I see Henry as equivalent to (as one example) the current Springfield Armory (http://www.springfield-armory.com/aboutus.php). The current Henry Repeating Arms bought the Henry name in 1996 as noted in this article from American Rifleman (http://www.americanrifleman.org/article.php?id=24530&cat=3&sub=8). Still, it is very clear that the name behind the current "Henry" is Imperato (http://www.henryrepeating.com/about-henry-repeating.cfm). I see no evidence that the company is trying to hide that. Does it have a "straight-line relationship" to the original Henry? Not so much save perhaps that the owners apparently like working in this line of business and they do make good products (and one should add made in the US, unlike a lot of Springfield's offerings).

The originators of the modern "Henry" company found stuff that they were interested in doing that has a market, and created value that customers would pay for. When a name (and associated intellectual property) with significant cache' came available the company bought it and built around it. Hence, what we know now as "Henry Repeating Arms" owns the Henry name and associated intellectual property such as past designs. Henry Repeating Arms is apparently now building something very much like the original Henry rifle (save chambering from what I can read (http://www.thetruthaboutguns.com/2013/05/robert-farago/new-from-henry-repeating-arms-the-original-henry-rifle-ish/)), and given the ownership of the name and intellectual property the company has that right.

Hence, at the end of the day, the current Henry Repeating Arms owns the Henry name and the patents, so they're just as much "Henry" as the current Springfield Armory is "Springfield" and the current F15 is "Boeing", or the current Marlin (owned by Remington) is "Marlin".

More relevant to what I think is the point that matters, Henry makes well-built, good-looking and functional products and from what I can tell stands behind them.

2fewdaysafield
November 25, 2013, 01:48 AM
VERY nicely said Sir.

Some will get their knickers in a twist about "lineage" and marketing. Others will simply enjoy a high quality rifle.

An HRA Henry is every bit as much a "Henry" as is a new production Winchester.

CaliCoastie
November 25, 2013, 02:07 AM
simple?
Henry
pros: solid, dependable, great customer service.
cons: weight(typically 2-2lbs heavier)

rossi
pros: cheaper, side loading gate
cons: customer service spotty, lawyer safety, sometimes needs work to action.

depends on what your looking for. sorry for any that read my original post, trying to get this topic back on track.

2fewdaysafield
November 25, 2013, 11:11 AM
That pretty much covers it.

jim in Anchorage
November 25, 2013, 01:03 PM
The current Henry Repeating Arms bought the Henry name in 1996
Your link no work. Who pray tell owned the henry name in 1996? 130 years after the fact? Only Winchester would have a claim to that, Henry was a sub contractor and all his patents where assigned to Winchester.

2fewdaysafield
November 25, 2013, 06:27 PM
Jim,

This is just a guess, but not a bad one I think....By 1996 Winchester was already in financial trouble and had been for quite a while. If they (Winchester) actually owned the Henry name it wouldn't surprise me one bit if they sold the name to generate some cash. Much as Pan Am sold the Pan Am building in NYC and many other assets to try to keep afloat.

The Imperato family has been in the firearms business for many years (they built guns for Colt for a while long before they started HRA) so it wouldn't surprise me a bit if the Imperato family approached Winchester about buying the Henry name. Keep in mind that Imperato Sr. was involved with Ithica (I think it was) which in conjunction with Erma in Germany (I think it was) sold the original rimfire rifles that are the basis for all the HRA rimfires which are their core business.

Pity the link that was posted does not work, but I find the idea that the Imperato family bought the Henry name from Winchester very plausible. Imperato had been in the firearms industry for quite a while, had connections and were sharp. If they saw a chance to buy the Henry name from Winchester at a firesale price it is the kind of thing they would have done.

Like them or hate them, the Imperato family are a bunch of smart businessmen.

Nighteyes
November 25, 2013, 07:54 PM
Dear God in Heaven.

IMO, this thread has devolved so far from the OP (original premise) that I see no way back. The current Henry Big Boy has about as much of a relationship with the original 1860 Henry Rifle as a Twinkie does with a Johnny-Cake.

-- Nighteyes

skeptical_in_Ohio
November 26, 2013, 03:29 AM
Your link no work.

Sorry about that; fixed it.

Who pray tell owned the henry name in 1996? 130 years after the fact? Only Winchester would have a claim to that, Henry was a sub contractor and all his patents where assigned to Winchester.

One may take that up with the nice publishers at NRA (American Rifleman), who stated this in the above-referenced article, "...Imperato acquired the Henry Repeating Arms brand in 1996...".

I had read that that statement to mean that something was purchased from somebody, but it seems a more precise statement (than the one in American Rifleman) may be found in the Wikipedia entry for Henry Repeating Arms (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Repeating_Arms), which states "...the company resurrected the Henry name in 1996...", which doesn't seem to suggest a purchase from anybody, but a new construct intended to evoke a certain tradition.

If this is the case, it would appear that there was no transfer of intellectual property (such as in the McDonnell-Douglas or Marlin examples I provided in the earlier post). I drew this inference (perhaps too hastily) from the statement in American Rifleman, which now appears questionable.

This said, given that Henry Repeating Arms is invoking the legacy of the original Henry (which is strongly suggested by the company's history page (http://henryrepeating.com/henry-history.cfm)), if somebody else did own the rights to that name, then it's plausible that somebody would assert that right at some point. Hence, it's reasonable to suggest that the new "Henry" is indeed a new construct.

As to patents, they are not an area of expertise for me, but I don't think that they would last for 130 years (e.g. that Rossi makes a clone of the Winchester suggests that something's lapsed).

All of the above stated, I return to my previous statement, to wit: "More relevant to what I think is the point that matters, Henry makes well-built, good-looking and functional products and from what I can tell stands behind them."

Still more importantly in the end - I intend to be out later this week shooting the Henry I own (and a few other things as well) with my kids.

Sorry for the rambling and the thread hijack, and for my part in taking us into the weeds :).

jim in Anchorage
November 26, 2013, 04:08 PM
Sorry for the rambling and the thread hijack, and for my part in taking us into the weeds .
No need to be sorry Ohio. It's plain you've done research on this. I just do not like people blindly stating as fact the modern Henry rifle company can "trace it's lineage to the original" The toggle link lever action Winchester [henry, models 1866, 1873, 1876] was designed and patented by Smith and Wesson. Those patents where sold to the company that would become Winchester [new haven arms I believe-I don't have access to my Winchester books at the moment] The S&W design was the basis for the volcanic rifles/pistols that used a caseless bullet that had the powder charge in a hollow base.
Henrys main contribution to the rifle that would bear his name was designing and producing a .44 rimfire cartridge [the .44 Henry-who would guess he would call it that?] and adapting the S&W/volcanic design to handle it. The "Henry" name on the rifle is more the cartridge then the gun.

Well now I am the one rambling but I have a passion about early Winchesters and hate seeing the facts distorted. The shirt maker Oliver Winchester just bought the patents and provided the capital to manufacture the gun. Henry's main role was to adapt the design to his new rim fire .44. He left the company in 1866 at which time the name was changed to Winchester.

How any one could claim "lineage" to the Henry rifle given that history?

Edit: I have no opinion on the modern Henry rifle what so ever. In fact I have never seen one. I am just interested in clarifying the historical facts.

shafter
November 26, 2013, 08:29 PM
Henry's Henry rifle doesn't even look like Tyler's Henry. It's more like a b-----dized version of the 1866.

ArchAngelCD
November 27, 2013, 06:43 AM
No need to be sorry Ohio. It's plain you've done research on this. I just do not like people blindly stating as fact the modern Henry rifle company can "trace it's lineage to the original" The toggle link lever action Winchester [henry, models 1866, 1873, 1876] was designed and patented by Smith and Wesson. Those patents where sold to the company that would become Winchester [new haven arms I believe-I don't have access to my Winchester books at the moment] The S&W design was the basis for the volcanic rifles/pistols that used a caseless bullet that had the powder charge in a hollow base.
Henrys main contribution to the rifle that would bear his name was designing and producing a .44 rimfire cartridge [the .44 Henry-who would guess he would call it that?] and adapting the S&W/volcanic design to handle it. The "Henry" name on the rifle is more the cartridge then the gun.

Well now I am the one rambling but I have a passion about early Winchesters and hate seeing the facts distorted. The shirt maker Oliver Winchester just bought the patents and provided the capital to manufacture the gun. Henry's main role was to adapt the design to his new rim fire .44. He left the company in 1866 at which time the name was changed to Winchester.

How any one could claim "lineage" to the Henry rifle given that history?

I tried not to answer all the posts about what I said because I didn't want to add to the thread hijack but this is just too much!

I never said the current Henry owners were related to Henry or Winchester. Most people know about King, Benjamin Henry and his relationship to Winchester and the levergun. They know about the 1860 rifle which was named a Henry the 1866 was named a Winchester so I didn't go into a half page post explaining all that. All I said was, "The current Henry Repeating Arms company can trace it's linage back to the original Henry plant in New Haven, CT." (which most know became the Winchester Plant) Since the current owners bought the rights to the Henry name how is what I said wrong? All the other stuff said after that was not anything I said...

Would anyone claim Redfield scopes aren't Redfield scopes just because the name wasn't used for many years? No, it was bought by Leupold and brought back so of course the current Redfield has linage to the original. Same thing with Ithaca, they were gone for Decades and the name was bought several times IIRC but would anyone say an Ithaca shotgun isn't an Ithaca, I hope not...

I just can't understand all the hate and how some people on forums think it's alright to jump all over others if they feel someone didn't explain every little detail and make them feel good. These companies don't put food on your table and they don't pay your bills so why go to battle for a name that's over 130 years old?

Edit: I have no opinion on the modern Henry rifle what so ever. In fact I have never seen one. I am just interested in clarifying the historical facts.
This is a forum for goodness sakes, not a classroom! The OP asked about a .357 Magnum Henry levergun and even though by your own admission you don't own one you did a lot of posting and why? Because you are only interested in clarifying historical facts! I think the OP was interested in current facts about the new Henry rifles.

Listen, do all the posting you want, just please leave me out of your snide remarks.

jim in Anchorage
November 27, 2013, 02:48 PM
Wow. I didn't know a discussion about a obsolete 150 year old gun could generate so much emotion. Who did the modern Henry company buy the naming rights from? In other words, who owned it 1996? You seem to be omitting that. I also wish to point out that you where the first to bring up the "lineage" thing here, stating it as fact. I questioned that opinion and requested more information. I did not "highjack" the thread. You did when you made a false statement about Henrys connections to the original rifles.

CaliCoastie
November 27, 2013, 03:02 PM
ArchAngel, the redfield scopes are compley different, they say that redfield has a heratige but that they are now part of Leupolds family...

ArchAngelCD
November 27, 2013, 08:30 PM
Wow. I didn't know a discussion about a obsolete 150 year old gun could generate so much emotion...

You did when you made a false statement about Henrys connections to the original rifles.
Even if I'm wrong that wouldn't make my "statement" false, it would make it incorrect. I do not appreciate being called a lair. It doesn't matter you played word games by saying I made false statements, that calling them lies.

I truly wish I could tell you exactly what I think about what you are doing here but that would get me in trouble with the Mods. Do not ever call me a liar again unless you are willing to do so face to face instead of behind the safety of your computer screen. You can now talk to yourself in this thread because I'm done here. I won't continue be insulted in a forum over a stupid rifle and it has nothing to do with the 150 year old rifle, it's all about how you talk to people...

doc2rn
November 27, 2013, 08:55 PM
I have a couple of other Henry's and mine all show significant wear on the brass receiver. I opted for the Marlin which also comes in stainless but I got the blued. I think the Marlin just shoots better.

Art Eatman
November 27, 2013, 11:55 PM
From the OP: "How durable is the finish on the brass recievers? Is it easy to damage. Does it hold up to regular range sessions? I typically lean towards stainless steel for the look and durability.

If you own one, do you have any regrets? Would you buy one?"

I guess about all the on-topic answers are done.

Sorta like this thread. :)

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