Considering a Model 10 Smith & Wesson


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SKL
October 5, 2013, 06:46 PM
I'm considering a Smith & Wesson Model 10 for my next gun purchase. Would anyone who owns one care to share their opinion of it? Shooting is a fairly new interest of mine and I sometimes prefer to get input from those who are more experienced. Thanks to all.

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tallpaul
October 5, 2013, 06:54 PM
A model 10 is a great gun for self defense and plinking. The lack of adjustable easy to use sights limits it target shooting but they are good sturdy guns. Depending on barrel length the primary uses may vary a bit. Grips can be easily changed for a different feel with many original and aftermarket grips available.

Great basic guns!

Hondo 60
October 5, 2013, 07:04 PM
Stop wasting time considering!
Run as fast as you can to the gun store and buy one!!!!!

I have a 4" 10-5 and it's without question the most accurate gun I have.
Ammo is available & not too terribly expensive (a whole lot less if you reload).

I think my next gun is gonna be a 6" M10 if I can find one reasonably priced.

http://www.jbabcock.net/guns/10-5a.jpg

GyMac
October 5, 2013, 07:12 PM
I have 4, 5, and 6 inch tapered barrel models and two 4 inch heavy barrels. I think, of them all, the 5 inch is my favorite, but they are all great. Very accurate and easy to shoot. For years I looked down on the .38 special, but now it is one of my favorite calibers. You cannot go wrong with a Model 10.

Iggy
October 5, 2013, 07:16 PM
There oughta be a law that everbody should own a S&W M&P/Model 10 of some kind.

MrDig
October 5, 2013, 07:43 PM
I have one with a bad case of holster rash and a grip that looks like 1/2 of the K-9 unit chewed on it. It came from Buds Guns over a year ago and I would not trade it for Love nor money.

They are great Guns.

btg3
October 5, 2013, 07:58 PM
The model 10 has a blued finish and the stainless steel version is the model 64 which you may also want to consider. These are excellent basic revolvers which shoot .38 Special ammo.

Bear in mind that a .357 revolver will shoot both .38 Special and .357 Magnum making it a more versatile choice.

Regardless, you won't regret owning a model 10 or model 64.

...
However, since you already own a model 36 and 686 you REALLY need to get a semi-auto... And then move up from plinking into some competitive games like IDPA, Steel Challenge, Pin shooting. Any of these will help you take your shooting to the next level and put you in the company of some experienced shooters with invaluable advice.

shafter
October 5, 2013, 08:17 PM
Go ahead and buy one! They are excellent revolvers and if we all went through life trying to buy the most versatile item it would be a drag. 38 Special is a fine cartridge with a very long history. Plus for the money you will never find firearm of the same class and craftsmanship.

JVaughn
October 5, 2013, 08:27 PM
They are outstanding. A true classic. Can't go wrong.

KCAce
October 5, 2013, 09:29 PM
Go for it! My first pistol over 30 yrs ago was a model 10 (used). It has always shot accurately and never needed repair after way over 1000 rounds. Also a very safe gun and a good pistol to train others with.
It was dumb luck that I chose that pistol to be my first 35 years ago. I'd make the same choice again. Good luck.
Kcace

Jim K
October 5, 2013, 10:00 PM
For a long time police surplus Model 10's (or pre-Model 10 M&P's) were available at very reasonable prices and some still turn up from time to time. These (along with Colt Police Positive revolvers) were for decades the quintessential police revolvers in the U.S. and much of the western world. They are rugged, reliable guns, though the Colts now suffer from a lack of factory support and parts. But in reality, neither brand is likely to need parts or repair in the foreseeable future (unless damaged by improper attempts at "improvement").

Jim

ZVP
October 5, 2013, 11:45 PM
Grab the Model 10 quick as you can! I
I have a 10-6 HB 4" that shoots POA at 13 yards and lollypops a 25 yard bull.
Single action is the most accurate shot but I am working on the DA Mode and getting better! Very hard to learn DA shooting! You makw so many subtile movements that throw the sight's off when tou shoot DA!
You couldn't askfor a tougher,time proven design thanthe Model 10. It is made for Duty carry and use, No frills, just business!
The .38 Special is a proven fight stopper with a long track record of Poilice and Militaty use. The Model 10 is designed NOT to faileven under the most stringent conditions and keep you alive in the end.
Todays premium Self Defense ammo is head and hells above ammo from just a decade ago! Bullet design is built around penetration, expansion, and maximum Bullet weight retention. It can be counted upon to preform even under the worst conditions. Heavy Clothes, auto glass etc.
Back to the Model 10; I think S^W ought to make a Package deal consisting of a all steel Model 36 and a Model 10. That's what I own and I can't think of a better combination of fighting revolvers!
Don't hesitate too long, that Model 10 won't ladt long if it has a good price on it!
My best advice for ya!
BPDave

marv
October 6, 2013, 12:02 AM
Go with it. I started too late. I found that there are so many options and variations of the Model 10 that one could spend a lifetime and a fortune trying to get them all. It would be a most interesting pursuit. And I've never heard of a bad one.

Onward Allusion
October 6, 2013, 12:28 AM
Great workhorses. Good plinker and does SD, too. Everyone should have at least a couple of 'em.

Twiki357
October 6, 2013, 12:51 AM
They’re good guns. I have an M&P (Pre model 10) 5” bbl that started life back in in 1950 or 1951 with a Sheriff Brown according to the name scratched in the grip and a 4” bbl no dash from 1960. Both are great guns.

CDawg
October 6, 2013, 12:58 AM
I've heard it said that the S&W Model 10 has everything you need and nothing that you don't. That's a very accurate statement. I prefer the 4" tapered (pencil) barrel, but I'm sure the heavy barrel versions are good to go too. They have been going up in price lately like everything else, but if you keep your eye out and are patient, you'll find a nice one.

TestPilot
October 6, 2013, 01:06 AM
If I was looking for a M10, I'd go for a bull-barrel setup, and a trigger job, just like Jim Cirillo had it.

ArkieVol
October 6, 2013, 02:17 AM
Buy it. Smith & Wesson started making them in 1899, have made over six million and are still making them. Got to be doing something right!

I have a 2", 3", 5" , 2 4" tapered barrel, and 2 4" heavy barrels, and two heavy barreled model 64's (stainless version of mod 10). Dang! Didn't realize how many I had until I read this post and started counting. :)

Carried a 4" taper barreled mod 10-5 for 17 years and a 4" mod 64 for 13 as duty weapons. They are like a woman's little black dress and a mans Ford F-150 pick up...dependable and effective..

Nar
October 6, 2013, 02:37 AM
Good gun, I have a Model 10 HB, my father used it to teach me when i was young. always told me if you can't solve the problem with 6 shots then you aren't going to solve it. Single action is dead on, double is good enough for most non-target applications.

The only thing i would say is that you should also look at a Model 13, it is basically just a model 10 HB in .357 i found one a while back and have been happy with it, same feel just the option for more power.

il.bill
October 6, 2013, 03:57 AM
Be patient in your search for a Model 10, and then jump on it when you find the deal that feels right. Read through the 'Stickies' at the top of this forum, especially "Common S&W Identifying Features" and the "Revolver Checkout" for some valuable information.

A Model 10 is a superb choice for a dependable and accurate handgun, but do some research on the S&W K-frame Revolver. For example, a Model 15 (with adjustable sights) or a Model 65 (stainless steel .357 magnum) will give you very much the same experience with some added features.

I would recommend a 4" barrel S&W K-frame to anyone as a good 'first' choice in a revolver. Adding a 2" snubbie and a 5" or 6" barrel version to your collection is then a natural progression. Many folks consider the 3" version to be the perfect one for carry - that size is one of the few firearms on my current long term wish list.

I usually take three to five different handguns with me when I go out to enjoy my shooting hobby and close to 99% of the time at least one of them is a S&W K-frame revolver.

SKL
October 6, 2013, 03:26 PM
Thank you to all who replied with great advise and comments. They're all very helpful.
In response to btg3, yes I will be looking into a semi auto and getting some shooting experience beyond the range. Like many other shooters, money and time are also considerations. What caliber semi do you suggest starting with? Thanks again.

btg3
October 6, 2013, 03:42 PM
My primary choice was 9mm because:
1. .380 not allowed at IDPA
2. 9mm ball ammo is less expensive than .380 or .45 (savings add up)
3. 9mm SD ballistics have improved significantly over the years
4. 9mm capacity typically exceeds pocket pistols and the 1911 platform
5. A majority of shooters have also chosen 9mm

In recent years, IDPA stats show that 9mm participation has increased, while .45 has declined. The top brand is Glock, however the M&P introduction has steadily gained on Glock.

Learn the proper grip for semi-auto (not the same as a revolver) then see what feels the best at your LGS toward finding the right gun for you.

If you're not inclined toward IDPA, a standard size 9mm polymer gun still has a lot of flexibility to enjoy. (I've also shot mine at Steel Challenge, Pin Matches, 2-gun matches)

SKL
October 6, 2013, 04:01 PM
My primary choice was 9mm because:
1. .380 not allowed at IDPA
2. 9mm ball ammo is less expensive than .380 or .45 (savings add up)
3. 9mm SD ballistics have improved significantly over the years
4. 9mm capacity typically exceeds pocket pistols and the 1911 platform
5. A majority of shooters have also chosen 9mm

In recent years, IDPA stats show that 9mm participation has increased, while .45 has declined. The top brand is Glock, however the M&P introduction has steadily gained on Glock.

Learn the proper grip for semi-auto (not the same as a revolver) then see what feels the best at your LGS toward finding the right gun for you.

If you're not inclined toward IDPA, a standard size 9mm polymer gun still has a lot of flexibility to enjoy. (I've also shot mine at Steel Challenge, Pin Matches, 2-gun matches)
Thanks again.

bannockburn
October 6, 2013, 04:32 PM
SKL

Definitely can't go wrong with selecting a quality revolver like the S&W Model 10 as your next handgun purchase.

W.E.G.
October 6, 2013, 04:51 PM
Utility-grade S&W wheelguns can be addictive.

Brace yourself!

http://i227.photobucket.com/albums/dd7/rkba2da/pistol%20pics/braceofbraces.jpg

Gun Master
October 6, 2013, 05:07 PM
Model 10 first, then 9mm. Suggest surveying autoloader thread.:)

69Falcon
October 6, 2013, 05:42 PM
The Model 10 is one sweet firearm.

I'm a pencil bbl. guy, FWIW.

rikman
October 6, 2013, 07:49 PM
I love the model 10 ...have a couple of them if that says anything :-)

dprice3844444
October 6, 2013, 07:58 PM
go for a model 65

GyMac
October 6, 2013, 08:11 PM
A man at our range had brought his daughter and son-in-law to do some shooting. They were both newbies and he was letting them try several of his guns, including some of the newest autos. I offered to let them shoot my 4 inch Model 10 and the daughter, in particular, shot quite well with it. It was remarkable how much better she shot with the 10 than the other guns. I heard her tell her father that her favorite of the guns they were shooting was my Model 10.

frankmako
October 6, 2013, 08:41 PM
a model 10 is a great gun, add some +p ammo and it is hard to beat.

BCRider
October 6, 2013, 10:25 PM
Just yet another boring reply to BUY THE DARN MODEL 10 ! ! ! ! !

As for a 9mm there's lots of great options. Your choice is going to be between striker fired triggers and hammer fired triggers. And closely related to this is all metal or metal and plastic.

Of the hammer fired guns MOST will be DA/SA. Some will be DAO and some will be SAO. The which and why will be related to what you want to use the gun for.

In the meantime you simply CANNOT GO WRONG IN ANY MANNER with a model 10 unless a safe was dropped on it or Bubba had his way with it and welded on a Wurlitzer to the frame.

M1GarandDeerHunter
October 7, 2013, 02:55 AM
Buy, Buy, Buy! Get that model 10!!! Pa gave me his, and I shot it to death. The only thing in like 10,000 rounds thru that thing, that broke, was the bolt. It lives with a S&W model 442, blissfully. .38 spl. and model 10 were created for each other. Simple and Elegant I say. Great pictures in posts 18 and 25! I highly doubt you will regret the choice.

evan price
October 7, 2013, 06:40 AM
Model 10 is pretty much the gold standard for a 38 special revolver. It's hard to mess one up and often pretty obvious it's happened.
2", 3", 4", 5", 6" all available plus some half sizes in between.
I really like pre-lock, pinned-barrel K-frames- They aren't making them like that anymore.
Now let's talk 5-screw, long action pre WWII guns...

Driftwood Johnson
October 7, 2013, 08:01 AM
Howdy

You simply cannot go wrong with a Model 10. All those police departments could not have been wrong. I only actually own one Model 10, the four incher at the bottom of this photo. Most likely a police trade in with an armorer's inventory number above the trigger guard. Best deal I ever got on a Smith, $125 out the door about ten years ago.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v495/Driftwood_Johnson/smith%20and%20wesson/fourinchsmiths.jpg

Now let's talk 5-screw, long action pre WWII guns...

OK...........



http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v495/Driftwood_Johnson/smith%20and%20wesson/MPSN62123602.jpg



http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v495/Driftwood_Johnson/smith%20and%20wesson/Model19051stChange.jpg



http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v495/Driftwood_Johnson/smith%20and%20wesson/M%20and%20P%20Round%20Butt/MPRoundButt01-2.jpg



http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v495/Driftwood_Johnson/smith%20and%20wesson/snubnoseMP02.jpg

CajunBass
October 7, 2013, 12:59 PM
Back when I was much younger and under the spell of Jeff Cooper, and the IPSC crowd, I looked down my nose at the old Model 10. Six shots? 38 Special? those goofy skinny grips and barrel and fixed sights? Did any intelligent people still use those? They weren't good for squirrels were they? They always reminded me of the guns the cops in old black and white movies carried, either in those silly swivel holsters, or in the pockets of those big. long greatcoats.

Somewhere along the line, I lost a lot of my smarts I guess, because now the old Model 10/38 M&P is my favorite handgun. I consider the 38 Special to be adequate for anything I want to use a handgun for. The "pencil barrel" is a thing of grace and beauty, and carries light and easy. The grips are still too small, but are easily changed, or even better for me, a T-grip can be added.

At one time I had a pretty nice accumulation of Smith and Wesson revolvers, from 22 to 44 Magnum. I sold them all off but two. On is my Model 12-2, which is nothing more than a Model 10 made with an aluminum frame. The other is a 1955 Military and Police 38.

http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b292/CajunBass/handguns/100_0476.jpg (http://s21.photobucket.com/user/CajunBass/media/handguns/100_0476.jpg.html)

I do have another Model 10 (no dash) on layaway at Ali-Babba's House O Guns.

Get one. You won't regreat it.

*NOVA*
October 7, 2013, 01:11 PM
A used Model 10 police trade in was my first gun! Bought it just a few years ago and then let it go. Sure enough, looking to replace it I find they have gone up in market value. Get one and hang on to it!

Jim NE
October 7, 2013, 01:17 PM
Everyone's right, the OP should get one, but I haven't seen the standard caveat about the new ones on this thread, and the OP didn't state whether he was looking at a new one or an old one, so I'll chime in.

There's nothing wrong with the new model 10's, despite what people say about the internal lock systems. The only problem is you'll end up paying more than you need to with a new gun. Old model 10's kind of have a reputation (a little bit exaggerated) of not wearing out, so most of the old guns, even if used a fair bit, are generally good functioning guns. It'll save you a couple hundred with an old one.

The fixed sights mean you may have to compensate a little bit, but if you're willing to do that, they can be very accurate guns. Some people fret about the spec ranges of the old ones, but I've had some that were outside the spec ranges that were still good shooters and seemed to be safe and solid. If the lock up is a little loose, that's okay, if it's more than a little loose, have a smith check it out.

I'd avoid the old classic 5 screw "pre" models only because they tend to cost more. Somewhat true with 4 screw models, too. A 3 screw from the 60's or 70's is ideal, IMO.

krupparms
October 7, 2013, 01:34 PM
I picked up a used model 10 after the Chattanooga P.D. went to 9mm,s in the early '80s'. It must have been issue to a desk cop because of the condition of the gun & it's grips. The grips were plastic imitation stag & the gun only showed some holster wear. I put some new grips on it & fell in love. It has been one of the best pistols I have owned & I will aways keep it until I am gone, then it will go to one of my grandsons . I hope that it will give them as much pleasure & fun along with the protection it has given me. Long live the model 10! Let us hope S&W always makes them & keeps improvement up without changing the classic look of it. :)

Old Dog
October 7, 2013, 02:00 PM
Here's the last Model 10 I picked up -- a nickel-clad snubby (box in the background not for this revolver):
http://i1252.photobucket.com/albums/hh577/Beau360/DSCN0337.jpg (http://s1252.photobucket.com/user/Beau360/media/DSCN0337.jpg.html)
My favorite Model 10 remains the 4" pencil barrel, of course ...

griff383
October 7, 2013, 02:09 PM
A used Model 10 was one of the first few handguns I purchased, I still have it but not many of the others if that says anything. Someday that revolver will be passed on for yeat another generation to enjoy

Maj Dad
October 7, 2013, 09:18 PM
My first M10 was a used 5" pencil barrel I picked up in ~1970 for $50-$60 or so. My next was a "catfish" gun I bought ~2005 to keep on my boat. The last, not a true M10, was a 5" M&P made in 1946-47, one of the last long action pistols with the added hammer drop safety. The M&P will be the last pistol I will ever let go, for whatever reason - it's that good. Look for an M&P made from 1946-1958 for a real jewel of a pistol...
http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=117761&d=1268695438
http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=117764&d=1268695649

jrod
October 7, 2013, 09:53 PM
Model 10's are great !!! Go for it!

guardjim
October 7, 2013, 10:09 PM
I joined the PD in 1969 and was issued a model 10. As a detective I carried it or a model 36. I left the PD in 1978 and took a better paying job for a large defense contractor where the issue weapon was a model 10. I turned it in to the company in 2008 when I retired. A great revolver and I bought my own after I retired and love to shoot it along with my 6" 19. I have to admit though that my CCW is a Ruger SP101 DAO snub. Go to http://www.snubnose.info/ (the snubnose files) and look up "the model 10 Smith & Wessons workhorse" for a great education on the model 10.
Yeah I know my punctuation stinks.

HexHead
October 8, 2013, 07:33 AM
I got mine probably about five years ago. A LGS had bought out a security company's inventory, Smiths, Tauruses, Charters. About 85 of them were S&Ws. I had the owner pick me out a nice 4" pencil barrel, square butt Model 10. $200 OTD. The right grip was really worn, so I put new Magna grips on it. Lots of holster wear, it was carried often and shot almost never.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v343/scat999999/misc/DSC_0001-1.jpg

I may shoot it more accurately than any of my other handguns. SA, DA, one handed, two handed, it doesnt matter. It's such a joy to shoot.

aarondhgraham
October 8, 2013, 10:13 AM
There is an argument to be made,,,
That the S&W Model 10 is "the" American handgun.

It's like the Ford F-150 of DA/SA revolvers,,,
There are fancier more elaborate handguns out there,,,
But as far as pure performance, none can really top it by much.

Several years back I acquired a grizzled old specimen in a trade,,,
Most of the blue finish was worn off so it looked like crap,,,
But it's trigger was superb and it grouped very tightly.

For some reason it shot a bit to the left at 25 yards,,,
I solved that problem by aiming a bit to the right.

When a young friend of mine graduated from Oklahoma State University,,,
I made a kit of the gun, a holster I made, and a Lee hand Loader,,,
Cased all together in a box I bought at Hobby Lobby.

I really expected him to buy something newer but he never did,,,
He's now in the process of trying to wear the gun out,,,
It just keeps on shooting as he gets better with it.

My point is that it's a truly great revolver,,,
It's what all modern DA/SA revolvers are measured against.

Aarond

.

87hurricane
October 9, 2013, 02:55 AM
As many others have said, go for it, you won't be dissapointed. My old beat up Model 10 is ugly, but shoots like a dream, and almost always goes to the range with me. For me, a 4" k frame really is the perfect revolver, it fits my hand just right, balances and points perfectly.

Old Dog
October 9, 2013, 02:18 PM
While I agree with aarond about the Model 10 being "The American revolver" ... I always think of it more like the Chevy 1500 of handguns ...:D

Black Knight
October 9, 2013, 10:09 PM
I have a 10-8 with 4 inch heavy barrel. I had the springs changed and it is one of the best shooters I have. I would say it is on par with my Colt Python at distances out to 15 yards. After 15 Yards the Python is slightly better.

Jim NE
October 9, 2013, 10:19 PM
While I agree with aarond about the Model 10 being "The American revolver" ... I always think of it more like the Chevy 1500 of handguns ...:D
:) :) Or is the Chevy 1500 the Smith and Wesson model 10 of trucks??


Regardless, the Model 10 is the archetype of the American double action revolver.

SKL
October 20, 2013, 12:33 PM
Thanks for all the encouraging information. I'm also considering a S&W mod 64 or mod 67 which I think is simply a stainless steel version of the model 10 as btg3 pointed out earlier. I believe that the only difference between the 64 and 67 is the 67 has adjustable sights. Please correct me if I'm wrong about this. Does anybody have any comments or recommendations about the differences between the Mod 10, 64, and 67? Once again, I appreciate all the responses and place value on all of them.

Gun Master
October 20, 2013, 01:53 PM
There are some copies of the Model 10 that look good, but are not well made (such as some Spanish copies). Look for the S&W logo, to be safe.:)

BCRider
October 20, 2013, 03:01 PM
Check out this for a list of the various K frame models;

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smith_&_Wesson

Just before half way down there's a list of all the various frame sizes and models produced with those frames. The names are links to Wiki pages for each model. This should be a good first reference for you.

SKL
October 20, 2013, 04:19 PM
Great info. Thank you.

deputy tom
October 20, 2013, 04:56 PM
My HB model 64 4" is the only gun I'd never consider selling. tom. :cool:

SKL
October 20, 2013, 06:48 PM
Thanks. I'm wondering how the 64 compares to the 67 other than the adjustable sights.

deputy tom
October 20, 2013, 08:46 PM
The skinny bbl 64 is like a 67 with fixed sights. Heavy bbl 64s are like hb 10s. tom.

M1GarandDeerHunter
October 20, 2013, 08:48 PM
The 67 handles like the Model 10 skinny barrel. Stainless version of the model 15 combat masterpiece. You really would not be making a mistake buying a 67. Very nice piece.

SKL
October 21, 2013, 02:02 PM
Are the current mod 10's, 64's, and 67's being produced by Smith & Wesson today standard barrel or heavy barrel?

Janos Dracwlya
October 21, 2013, 07:30 PM
My first gun, almost 20 years ago, was a Model 10 Royal Hong Kong Police issue. I took my CCW test with it, and taught my wife to shoot. It took a lot of abuse from both of us, and still works great. I gave it to my Dad a couple of years ago as a house gun since all he had were .22's.

tomrkba
October 21, 2013, 08:59 PM
There oughta be a law that everbody should own a S&W M&P/Model 10 of some kind.

Nah...some people, like me, dislike the K-Frame. I much prefer the GP100, Super Redhawk, and N-Frame sizes.

btg3
October 27, 2013, 07:12 AM
I have some of each... Model 64, Speed Six, Service Six.

After trigger jobs on all, the Rugers just don't measure up. If you're happy with any trigger, the Rugers are otherwise just fine.

SKL
October 27, 2013, 08:38 AM
I'm still interested to know if the current production 10's, 64's, and 67's being produced by Smith & Wesson today are standard barrel or heavy barrel. They appear to be heavy barrel on the S&W website but I'm still not sure.

David E
October 27, 2013, 09:33 AM
IIRC, the M-15 has a svelt skinny barrel that really makes it balance well. The M-67 has a thicker, but not a bull barrel that, for me, doesn't feel as nice.

Still, I'd give that 67 a good hard look.

Baba Louie
October 27, 2013, 09:59 AM
I'm still interested to know if the current production 10's, 64's, and 67's being produced by Smith & Wesson today are standard barrel or heavy barrel. They appear to be heavy barrel on the S&W website but I'm still not sure. HB.

But I'll ask you to ponder this... why buy new when you can find so many nice used older pre lock model 10-15-64-67's for less $$?

I'll also throw this out there to ponder, look for a 3" or 5" M10.

SKL
October 27, 2013, 10:18 AM
That's a good question. I've always preferred new, never owned stuff because you never can be sure of the use and care a preowned item has had. I'm sure that I've missed out on some good buying opportunities but everyone needs to do what they're most comfortable with. Thanks for your interest.

MrBorland
October 27, 2013, 10:45 AM
Still, I'd give that 67 a good hard look.

Agreed. If this is going to be a range gun, I'd opt for adjustable sights. IMO, fixed sights are ok for a carry gun, in which case, I'd also prefer something with a 3" or less barrel.

As far as the M10, I had one (a pristine pencil-barreled 4" 10-5) because "everyone ought to have one". I neither carried it, nor found myself shooting it at the range, since I have better revos for that. Not much of a collector, I eventually sold it.

SKL
October 27, 2013, 03:15 PM
Is the adjustable sights the only difference between the 64 and 67?

PawDaddy
October 27, 2013, 04:14 PM
I wish that I still had my Model 10 snubby! :(

MrBorland
October 27, 2013, 04:17 PM
The front sight's different, too. The 67 utilizes a red ramp front that's pinned in, so it can be swapped for, say, a fiber optic if you prefer that. The 64 has a small-ish plain front sight that's integral with the barrel, so it's effectively unchangeable, especially if it's on a 2-piece barrel as shown on the S&W website.

Jaymo
October 27, 2013, 11:59 PM
I like the look of the fixed sight Smiths better, but I like the sight picture of adjustable sight Smiths better.
Own both, like both, won't sell either. If I were to sell one, it wouldn't be my 15-3 or my 586 no dash.
Doubt I could sell my 10-6, though. She's not real purty on the outside. She's great on the inside, but she was an evidence locker gun, and looks to have possibly been a suicide gun.
Kinda morbid, if you think about it. I try not to think about it. Can't blame an inanimate object for the actions of it's owner.....wait a minute, the gun control crowd does.

Water-Man
October 28, 2013, 01:25 AM
My first carry gun was a 1953 Model 10 snubby. I've had a few since then but I only have one left. It's a 10-7 3". A good shooter with great balance. I carry it from time to time.

ka4pxk
October 29, 2013, 10:07 AM
Buy it, it is a good carry gun, with flat nose bullets it is a good stopper, and it hold up great. I have a 53 M&P and a newer one. I don't carry them, they stay by my bed or in the gun safe as they are collectors piece. I am looking for one to carry to replace my Bersa Thunderer. I carry a Colt SAA a lot. I figure a revolver is a good choice for a carry gun in that when the nerves hit, fine motor skills can go out the window. Here in SC I can carry any gun I want, I used the M&P 38 for qualifying and scored better than most with Glocks and such. Get a used but not abused Model 10 save the money and use it to practice and get your skills honed. Also in a push you can pull bring the gun up not aim and with the point ability of the 10 you can save a second or two and it might save your life

Tortuga12
October 29, 2013, 01:46 PM
Can't go wrong with a K-Frame!

http://i.imgur.com/8pRFp9m.jpg?1

ka4pxk
October 29, 2013, 01:54 PM
Can't go wrong with a K-Frame!

http://i.imgur.com/8pRFp9m.jpg?1
Nope, they are great guns and a great trigger pull and as sound as a double eagle gold piece.

krupparms
October 29, 2013, 09:58 PM
+1 For the S&W model 10! Everyone ought to have at least 1! ;)

shep854
October 30, 2013, 09:50 PM
When the S&W bug bites, it bites HARD! Check out the Smith & Wesson Forum:
http://smith-wessonforum.com/forum.php

A couple of videos featuring Model 10s (or Military & Police, as they used to be called)
"FBI Training Video--Fundamentals of Double-Action Revolver Shooting" From 1960-ish
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PmdsZXV4Hh0

A 1936 film of LASD officers exhibition shooting and training--some of the techniques look surprisingly modern!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jDP8BRSEjrA

Jaymo
October 30, 2013, 10:01 PM
The shooter in the start of the film appears to have been left handed/cross eye dominant. He's shooting LH and canting the revolver to the right, while apparently sighting with his right eye.
He's also one helluva shot.

shep854
October 30, 2013, 10:07 PM
There's NO WAY I'd want to be anywhere around some of those stunts!:what:

Jaymo
October 30, 2013, 10:46 PM
Not even behind the trigger.

shep854
October 30, 2013, 10:49 PM
Got that right! ESPECIALLY behind the trigger!

evan price
October 31, 2013, 05:54 PM
Agreed. If this is going to be a range gun, I'd opt for adjustable sights. IMO, fixed sights are ok for a carry gun, in which case, I'd also prefer something with a 3" or less barrel.

Yeah, but...load it up with some 38 special 158-grain lead SWCs running in the 750-800 fps range, and you'll never need to adjust those sights, they will hit right where you point it everytime.

Gun Master
October 31, 2013, 07:48 PM
Give that man a cigar, and I'll give him a hair lip ! I'll be pulling the trigger. I pass on holding the target .:)

ka4pxk
October 31, 2013, 09:14 PM
Yeah, but...load it up with some 38 special 158-grain lead SWCs running in the 750-800 fps range, and you'll never need to adjust those sights, they will hit right where you point it everytime.
I love that load, and for my SAA 45 255 gr RNFP, both shoot right to point of aim or point, the 158 is a great load in most Model 10s and copies and beat the tar out of RN for small game and 2 legged varmints, if that terrible need ever happens.

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