Anyone into MilSurps and reloading for them?


PDA






Ken G Artillery FO.
October 8, 2013, 06:11 PM
I'v have my father in laws 7.5 x 55 Schmidt Rubin family hand me down in mint condition W/ Bayonet, he brought back from Switzerland after WWII.
Sits next to My dads 6.5 X 50 (Really X 51) Arisaka carbine not quite mint, the "weed" was filled off. Anyhow they are both tack drivers factory Norma ammo sucks on the Jap. Reloading for both gets the job done.
Anyone else into older Military firearms, & reloading to bring out there inherent accuracy? even a smooth bore can be accurate.(within reason)
PS.Just trying to rekindle an old thread.

If you enjoyed reading about "Anyone into MilSurps and reloading for them?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
TimboKhan
October 8, 2013, 11:59 PM
I am going to change this thread title, just so that people that might be have an interest in participating know what this thread is about. "Chuck Wagon Ken" doesn't really call out to MilSurpers, lol...

BCRider
October 9, 2013, 12:19 AM
I got a couple of Mosin Nagants about a year ago. Bought some milsurp ammo in SPAM cans for giggles. Found out it shoots "minute of hubcap" at best. Got a box of Privi Partizan ammo and found out that it went from an 8 to 10 inch group at 100 to 3'ish inches even with my bad old guy eyes and poor bag rest technique.

I've since managed to get all the bits and pieces together to reload my own ammo and I'm looking forward to seeing how well these old war horses can perform.

So all in all I'm firmly with you on the idea that if we can feed these war rifles some good "food" that they'll do far better than most folks give them credit for.

mudriver
October 9, 2013, 12:27 AM
I reload 14 different calibers give or take primarily for milsurps and strange stuff.

My 12 year old recently shot a 4" 10 shot group at 100 yds with his M44 (I paid $40 for the gun) using some basic reloads. Reloading seems to really bring out the best in my military guns. I've been getting under 2 MOA with my FAL, a little more with my K98 and turk, awesome groups with my Garand etc. Its also nice to drop the recoil in these guns for my kids and reduce the noise when shooting around neighbors.

Almost seems a shame to shoot the milsurp ammo in my beautiful guns!

BruceB
October 9, 2013, 12:31 AM
I have owned, studied, and loaded ammunition for EVERY major military rifle system since the dawn of the centerfire cartridge era (with the conspicuous exception of the trap-door Springfield... I'll get to that one someday).

This has taken over forty years, and I still enjoy it. The loading has morphed into mostly cast-bullet research, and that is even MORE interesting and rewarding.

This pursuit can be either very simple, with components and cartridges that are easily available, or develop into a detective story as you search for oddball brass, bullets, dies, moulds.... you name it.

Along the way, you may well get an education about world and military history, along with a good dose of obscure geography.

Enjoy.

cfullgraf
October 9, 2013, 12:35 AM
I reload for USGI M1 Garands, USGI 1903s, and USGI M1 Carbines. Do they count as military surplus?

I have a Moisin Nagant and dies for it. If I ever get around to shooting it, I will reload for it.

Don357
October 9, 2013, 12:40 AM
I've got a M48 Yugo 8mm that I want to try reloading for. It will do 6-8" groups at 100yds with some spam can 1958 vintage Yugo, and 4" groups with some 196gr Sellier and Bellot SPCE that I bought for hunting. Those groups are with my 53 year old eyes and iron sights. I hope to get some dies soon, but they're not a priority right now. I've got a nice .308 if I need a precision rifle.

119er
October 9, 2013, 01:07 AM
I reload for M1 Garand, 1903A3, M1A, and .303 British for my No.4's. I have yet to get around to 8mm, 6.5X55, or 7.62X54R. Come to think of it I havent even shot the factory ammo to get the brass yet! Too busy these days.

Hardtarget
October 9, 2013, 01:18 AM
Loading for M1 Garand, .30 carbine, 303 Brit. , K-31 Swiss, 1903 Springfield at this time. I need dies for my K 98 and I'll be loading for all the mil-surp guns I have.

Mark

fpgt72
October 9, 2013, 08:35 AM
That is why I started reloading....The only thing I shoot surplus in are the Russian bolt guns....everything else I reload....and that is a fair bit. For some of these odd ball cartridges it is just too expensive or flat impossible to get ammo for. The Russian in not bad, so popular, but I do reload for the 54R in my SVT and PSL. I have reloaded quite a bit of 303 british and 7.5 French. Right now the Mas 36 is my go to bolt rifle. I also reload 30 carbine, 3006, 6.5 carcano, Both Arasaka cartridges, Krag, I know I have had to forget a few plus a few pistol cartridges.

Quite a bit of fun.

PJSprog
October 9, 2013, 05:24 PM
MilSurp is what got me back into handloading/reloading. I stopped loading many years ago because I stopped shooting as much. In fact, I rarely shot at all for several years (life got in the way). When I did start again about 10 years ago, I noticed a diminished availability of 7x57 Mauser ammo. Still wanting to shoot my excellent '95 Chilean Mauser, I started loading for it. Then I found a cherry low serial number '03 Springfield for a great price, and I started loading "soft" loads for it.

I now load for every caliber I own, with the exception of the rimfires, of course.

P5 Guy
October 9, 2013, 06:22 PM
The only way I get to shoot my SMLE #4mk1 is to handload 303BRIT.
I was going to get the dies for 7.92x57 but I sold off all the rifles that used that round. And I have been loading .30'06 for M1s and M1903A3. Just recycling doing my part for the 'Green Movement'.

Tinpig
October 9, 2013, 09:43 PM
I load .30-06 for my 1903, 1903A3, 1917, and M1 Garands, .30 Carbine for my M1 Carbines, and .303 British for my Enfield No4 Mk2. Saves me a lot of money, and keeps me out of mischief.
Tinpig

TheHappyGunner
October 9, 2013, 10:11 PM
I handload for my .30-40 Krag. She does ok with 180 gr. semi-jacketed round nosers. Money I've saved has been minimal, but the quality of ammunition you get from loading your own is better (if you're careful). I have .30-06 dies for my M1 but haven't gotten around to handloading those yet. Someday...

ball3006
October 9, 2013, 10:15 PM
I am a mislurp junkie. I bought lots of ammo when it was cheap. I am equipped to reload all of my calibers when the surplus runs out. I don't reload for my M39 Mosin Nagant. It shoots under one inch at 100 meters with Privi ammo. So, why bother.....chris3

351 WINCHESTER
October 9, 2013, 11:00 PM
Right now I just load for my .303 British. I have yet to shoot a factory load that comes close to my reloads as far as accuracy goes.

funnelcake
October 9, 2013, 11:26 PM
Several but tops for me is a Chilean contract (1895) Mauser in its original caliber.

Funnel

morcey2
October 10, 2013, 12:13 AM
I load for 8x57, 7x57, 7.62x54R, and 30-06, all for milsurp rifles of one form or another. Some still in the original form, others have been sporterized or even bubbafied. All of them seem to shoot better with handloads. Some shoot a little better, others a lot better.

Matt

Dean1818
October 10, 2013, 01:25 AM
Yugo 24/47

8 mm......

Reloading, i get 1.2 to 1.5 inch groups at 100

Hoping to tweak the loads some more to bust MOA

TrickyDick
October 10, 2013, 01:35 AM
7.62x54R..MN 91/30.. I did a handload which resulted with an 1.5" group at 100 yards, with Iron sights. could barely see the target, but prevailed quite well.

tahoe2
October 10, 2013, 09:48 AM
reloading for three-8x57 mausers (2-yugos & 98k) and two Spanish 7x57's.
Best I can manage with irons is 3"-4", but the scoped Yugo does 1-1/4" on a regular basis.

Them old guns shoot better than me.

Missionary
October 10, 2013, 10:16 AM
Good morning
Yep, I reload my own cast bullets and happily launch them downrange when I am up north in the US of A. My cast reloads will function all my semi autos. I figure it costs my 10 cents a round and I am never out of ammo.
Bolt rifles are just the same.. at least as accurate and most far better.
Oh course the muzzleloaders have always been reloads.
Mike in Peru

303tom
October 10, 2013, 10:21 AM
I reload alot of calibers, I don`t know why you would not, when a good set of die`s rarely cost more than 40 bucks....................

TenDriver
October 10, 2013, 10:48 AM
I reload for my Garand and a friend's M48. That's the only way we can afford to shoot those two. My other milsurps (91/30 and an SKS) get fed surplus or Wolf. With the price of consumables it doesn't seem cost effective and I have no brass for either. Would have to build that supply up too.

Centurian22
October 10, 2013, 10:54 AM
Love Mosin Nagants and just picked up my first couple boxes of reloadable brass ammo for them. I was given a couple of old .308 die sets and have read they can be modified for 7.62x54r. That's one of my over the winter projects. If not a new set of 54r dies will be in my future. Looking forward to making some accurate target and hunting ammo along with some trail boss light loads.

fpgt72
October 10, 2013, 01:35 PM
Love Mosin Nagants and just picked up my first couple boxes of reloadable brass ammo for them. I was given a couple of old .308 die sets and have read they can be modified for 7.62x54r. That's one of my over the winter projects. If not a new set of 54r dies will be in my future. Looking forward to making some accurate target and hunting ammo along with some trail boss light loads.
Dies are cheap, just get them. Just about everything I use is Lee, and I have never had a problem.

DougW
October 10, 2013, 02:47 PM
Been reloading .303 Enfield for 10+ years, which led to 30.06 for the M1 Garand.

TenDriver
October 10, 2013, 04:04 PM
Dies are cheap, just get them. Just about everything I use is Lee, and I have never had a problem.

If they would sell a 2 die set I'd be all over them. I only crimp magnum and 9mm loads. Don't need to spend extra dough on a crimp die I'll never use.

Cosmoline
October 10, 2013, 04:30 PM
IMHO handloading for surplus arms represents the greatest challenge and most rewarding one in handloading short of making your own wildcat. You can spend a lifetime wringing all the secrets out of rifle and load combinations. You'll find a hidden history written into these old war rifles. The precision of the Swiss, the practicality of the Red Army, the marksmanship of the Finns. You'll find unexpected elegance in places like Greece and Sweden. And you'll learn that everything is a matter of tradeoffs. The more precise, the more picky. The best can be the enemy of good enough.

Just about everything I use is Lee, and I have never had a problem.

I agree, Lee 54R dies are plenty good enough. And they're easy to find.

Ignition Override
October 12, 2013, 01:04 AM
Yes, for .303 British and .308 for the large-ring Spanish FR8 (read several hours studying possible or rumored issues). Being often bored with making holes in paper, most of the reloads are used on chunks of concrete blocks etc.

When I decide to reload for my Garands, those will be used for paper.

Kaeto
October 12, 2013, 09:37 AM
I am set up to reload for my .303 No 4 Mk 1, and my 8 mm Turkish K Kale Mauser. As well as my .455 Webley Mk VI.

Ken G Artillery FO.
October 16, 2013, 10:30 AM
I am going to change this thread title, just so that people that might be have an interest in participating know what this thread is about. "Chuck Wagon Ken" doesn't really call out to MilSurpers, lol...
Thanks, much better tittle.
Semper Fi. RVN 68-71
Ken G Artillery FO.
AKA ChuckWagonKen

Ken G Artillery FO.
October 16, 2013, 10:35 AM
If they would sell a 2 die set I'd be all over them. I only crimp magnum and 9mm loads. Don't need to spend extra dough on a crimp die I'll never use.
Oh my good Man, Never Say Never.
Ken G Artillery FO.
AKA ChuckWagonKen

Ken G Artillery FO.
October 16, 2013, 10:39 AM
IMHO handloading for surplus arms represents the greatest challenge and most rewarding one in handloading short of making your own wildcat. You can spend a lifetime wringing all the secrets out of rifle and load combinations. You'll find a hidden history written into these old war rifles. The precision of the Swiss, the practicality of the Red Army, the marksmanship of the Finns. You'll find unexpected elegance in places like Greece and Sweden. And you'll learn that everything is a matter of tradeoffs. The more precise, the more picky. The best can be the enemy of good enough.



I agree, Lee 54R dies are plenty good enough. And they're easy to find.
I Do Lee Too!

Ken G Artillery FO.
October 16, 2013, 10:56 AM
I reload for USGI M1 Garands, USGI 1903s, and USGI M1 Carbines. Do they count as military surplus?

I have a Moisin Nagant and dies for it. If I ever get around to shooting it, I will reload for it.
Yep!

Carl N. Brown
October 16, 2013, 10:59 AM
Anyone into MilSurps and reloading for them?

Most people buy a MilSurp firearm because the MilSurp ammo is/was cheaper than reloading/handloading.

I do handload for my shot-out C96 Mauser; with factory 7.63 Mauser ammo (official bullet diameter 7.86 mm (0.309 in)), patterns were all over the paper (and off) due to loose fit of ammo and worn-out barrel, with some bullets keyholing.

I worked up some handloads with .312" JHP (after trying .32" 00 buckshot) and consistently stayed in the black of the 25 yd pistol target off the bench and in one match I shot this group off hand at 25yards:
http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=170613&d=1346071719
If I did not reload/handload ammo to fit, this gun would be a wall hanger only, and where is the fun in that?

Ken G Artillery FO.
October 16, 2013, 11:11 AM
Much more productive title, Thanks.
ChuckWagon
Semper Fi. RVN 68-71

carbine85
October 16, 2013, 07:18 PM
I'm reloading 30.06, M1 Carbine, 303, and the 762x54R. Everything else falls into the newer ammo.

conrad427
October 16, 2013, 07:47 PM
I do not own any milsurps as of yet, but if I did Mike Venturino often writes about loading for military arms, both to replicate the original loads and lower velocity cast bullet loads. I find his articles informative and he has done a lot of research that will save the average joe like me a lot of money.

palmettokat
October 18, 2013, 09:42 AM
I am getting ready to reload some 3006 military surplus brass and my friend who is the expert on this tells me the powder loads are different for this brass compared to regular commercial brass due to it's thickness and is a lower load. Yet I have fail to find info on that. Can any of you help me?

tahunua001
October 18, 2013, 01:58 PM
I am, I got into it from necessity because of my two jap guns, my french gun and now most recently a M95 steyr. the steyr with handloads is right on par with my M1 garand and slightly better than my mosin nagants.

I have yet to shoot the 7.7 japanese enough to warrant reloads, I've just been putting hornady custom through it. it's about as accurate as my 1903 springfield and enfield number 4 though the zero if off and I haven't taken the time to drift the sight.

the 6.5 jap is a tack driver no matter what I put in it. it's a carbine so velocity sucks compared to the long rifles but I regularly ring an oxygen tank at 400 yards with that little gun off sandbags. it is easily the most accurate milsurp I own(second only to a 1903A4 sniper I used to own).

the 7.5 french sucks. it's zero is way off and the only way to adjust it is to get a rear sight with the peep drilled in a different spot which is impossible to find. I never shoot it, I've been trying to sell it for several months... no takers.

ldlfh7
October 18, 2013, 02:02 PM
I reload for my 8mm Turkish Mauser. The gun is not a tack driver but good enough for hunting deer. It sure is nice going into the garage and making up a box of shells vs ordering online and spending around $40 for some core-lokts after shipping...

theotherwaldo
October 18, 2013, 09:21 PM
Lessee. I'm currently set up to reload:
6.5, 7, 7.65, and 8mm Mauser. 7.5 French and Swiss. 6.5 Arisaka. .303 British. 7.62x39 and 7.62x54 Russian. .45-70, .30-40, .30-06, .308, and .30 carbine US.
-And a few others that I've been considering once I've fired them a bit more.
I always wanted an example of every major shoulder weapon type of the modern era, and the ability to keep them loaded.

browningguy
October 19, 2013, 12:08 AM
I'm not really "into" it but I do shoot an 1891 Argentine Mauser and handload for it. It's one of the most accurate rifles I have now that I have a load worked up for it.

mokin
October 20, 2013, 12:57 AM
I've got a couple of .303s, a 6.5 Carcano, and a Finnish M-39 I reload for. The M-39 prefers .308 diameter bullets to .310 or larger ammo manufactured for Mosins. One of the .303s is a 1918 Enfield. Both of those rifles are tack drivers. Lots of fun.

tgonza
October 20, 2013, 10:30 PM
I was given a 7.5x54 Cal 1936 MAS my cousin picked up at a yard sale years ago. It had been sportorized by a California company in 1949 according to a stamp on the barrel. It had no bolt at the time. I found an online company that had one and ordered it. Headspace looked okay so my buddy and I went to the woods, mounted it on a rifle rest, tied a string to the trigger and pulled the string. It shot fine. I had originally bought some factory loads I found. After shooting two boxes I had enough brass to begin reloading. I got some soft point 150 grain blemished repackaged bullets from Midway.

They shot good - I was able to hit a gallon milk bottle at 200 yards. I was on a cow elk hunt last November. I told my son if I saw one within 100 yards, I would use the MAS. We spotted one, I put the rifle on a fence post lined up the peep and pulled the trigger. She went right down, thankfully landing on a dirt track that we could pull up to. I would not hesitate to use it again up to 200 yards (peep elevates to 1200 meters!) on deer or cow elk, probably nothing bigger than that.

Jcinnb
October 20, 2013, 11:17 PM
I have been reloading both 8 mm Mauser and 7.62x54 for six months now. I have 1,000s of surplus x54 in storage that I will never shoot barring calamity. IMHO reloading IS SO MUCH BETTER all around.

fpgt72
October 21, 2013, 09:41 AM
I am getting ready to reload some 3006 military surplus brass and my friend who is the expert on this tells me the powder loads are different for this brass compared to regular commercial brass due to it's thickness and is a lower load. Yet I have fail to find info on that. Can any of you help me?
I don't think your friend is too much of an expert....and likely that brass is berdan primed. Pretty much useless in the reloading world...yea you can do it but why on something so common as a 3006.

Romeo 33 Delta
October 21, 2013, 04:13 PM
Since I've been collecting and shooting Milsurps for over 40 years, I load for close to 70 different calibers from 5.45 to .577 to feed arms from Sniders and Spencers to AR-15s and AKs. Were it not for reloading, there are far too many rifles and calibers that I'd never have been able to shoot.

There have been times when the supply of even common calibers has been short to just not available and for the less common and odd-ball calibers, that is the case most often ... or always. Remember some years back when we couldn't find surplus 8 X 57? Remember the day you found out that CMP had burned through nearly all their totally clean .30-06 and annual purchase limits were imposed? How about the days of HXP .303? When have you seen .236 Lee Navy for sale? How about .276 Enfield or 8 X 58R Krag? We have Privi today and while it's not cheap ... it's available! If not for them, where would you find 6.5 and 7.7 Jap or 6.5 and 7.35 Carcano?

Reloading is a godsend and while now may not be the best time to plunge into it because of component, powder and primer shortages ... my thought is that if circumstances permit, you should take a second look at it. It's not rocket science and it's safe! There are reloaders near you, when you're at the range, just ask around. They can help get you started with hands on experience. There are dozens of good books (The ABCs of Reloading and the Lee Reloading book are great sources of basic information) and good, safe reloading data is everywhere.

As an aside, reloading expands your shooting hobby into the off-season (for those of us north of the Mason-Dixon line) and there is nothing quite like taking your first batch of ammo to the range, loading your Milsup rifle and pulling the trigger. The BANG that follows is something you will NEVER forget!

Gotta' go now, I have quite a few boxes of fired brass that need reloading before next Spring!:D

palmettokat
October 22, 2013, 09:35 AM
"I don't think your friend is too much of an expert....and likely that brass is berdan primed. Pretty much useless in the reloading world...yea you can do it but why on something so common as a 3006."


He has some specs on reloading the older military 3006 brass that gives lower specs. So go from there. As to the brass being thicker it is and even by my eye sight can see that.

As to the primer, nope it is not berdan primed. So very much reloadable. He reloads a good bit of it. I will soon be doing the same.

mtrmn
October 22, 2013, 08:48 PM
"I don't think your friend is too much of an expert....and likely that brass is berdan primed. Pretty much useless in the reloading world...yea you can do it but why on something so common as a 3006."


He has some specs on reloading the older military 3006 brass that gives lower specs. So go from there. As to the brass being thicker it is and even by my eye sight can see that.

As to the primer, nope it is not berdan primed. So very much reloadable. He reloads a good bit of it. I will soon be doing the same.
Just use standard operating procedure--start low and work up. If using it in a Garand or other gas gun-do some more research for loads specifically for these guns.

palmettokat
October 22, 2013, 10:59 PM
This afternoon got copy of what he based this upon: Sierra's 5th edition reloading manual, page 544. It reads: " Loads for G.I. cases should be reduced by one to one and a half grains to compensate for their heavier construction."

That follows some comments on the Garands so it might be possible they are talking about only for that rifle but I do not think so.

Think will follow MTRMN's suggestion and begin on the low side.

Thanks all. PK

fpgt72
October 23, 2013, 11:41 AM
This afternoon got copy of what he based this upon: Sierra's 5th edition reloading manual, page 544. It reads: " Loads for G.I. cases should be reduced by one to one and a half grains to compensate for their heavier construction."

That follows some comments on the Garands so it might be possible they are talking about only for that rifle but I do not think so.

Think will follow MTRMN's suggestion and begin on the low side.

Thanks all. PK
Never read that before....interesting.....I stand corrected.....it however does not change that most of the military cases I have seen are berdan primed....you said your stuff has the friendly primers so it sounds like you are on top of it.

Vern Humphrey
October 23, 2013, 12:00 PM
Let's see -- I have two M1903A3s, a Garand and a Canadian Ross in .303. I also have a sporterized M96 Swede in 6.5X55 and a sporterized Springfield in .35 Brown-Whelen. I load for and shoot all of them.

mstreddy
October 23, 2013, 11:14 PM
For me -- MilSurps will be fed mostly by reloads. I have the dies for all except for the 7.5 Swiss already. I've loaded 30-06, 30 Carbine, 6.5x55 already and will roll some 8MM and 30-40 Krag soon.
30-06 in my Garands, M1903, M1903A3, M1917, and Belgian Mauser
30 Carbine - M1 Carbine
6.5x55 Swedish Mauser
8MM - Yugo, Kar98 and M48
303 Brit - Enfields No 4 Mk 1
7.5 Swiss K31
7.7 Jap Arisaka
30-40 Krag in 1898 Krag
7.62x25 CZ52

palmettokat
October 24, 2013, 10:05 AM
fpgt72....man it is a big learning process to me. My friend can quote more specs off the top of his head then I can find. Amazes me but he has been at it for a long time.

I do appreciate the info on the primer but again his guidance prevent that error. Now one error his missed or maybe can say he had never run into with military surplus is how hard some primers are. I have two 3006 rifles and one has no issue firing them and the other will dimple the primer but not hit hard enough to fire all, about 50%. Talked with local shop and they said it is not rifle issue but primer issue. Another story. One reason pushing to reload. PK

mtrmn
October 24, 2013, 01:04 PM
Never read that before....interesting.....I stand corrected.....it however does not change that most of the military cases I have seen are berdan primed....you said your stuff has the friendly primers so it sounds like you are on top of it.
I haven't seen a lot of different military 30-06 cases, But NEVER seen a Berdan primed one. All of the ones I've dealt with have been US made. I've seen "surplus" from other countries for sale from time to time-maybe this is what you're talking about.

mookiie
October 24, 2013, 11:26 PM
I reload .303, 7.62x54R, 30-06, 7.5x 55, 7.62x25, 7.62x39, 6.5 x 55, 30 carbine, 7.7 jap, 8x57 Mauser, 6.5 carcano, 308 win, and 8x56 R...that is all I can think of off the top of my head that are milsurps calibers.

hang fire
October 25, 2013, 04:31 AM
IMHO handloading for surplus arms represents the greatest challenge and most rewarding one in handloading short of making your own wildcat. You can spend a lifetime wringing all the secrets out of rifle and load combinations. You'll find a hidden history written into these old war rifles. The precision of the Swiss, the practicality of the Red Army, the marksmanship of the Finns. You'll find unexpected elegance in places like Greece and Sweden. And you'll learn that everything is a matter of tradeoffs. The more precise, the more picky. The best can be the enemy of good enough.



I agree, Lee 54R dies are plenty good enough. And they're easy to find.
I will not attempt to improve on your post, as it boils all down to it's essence.

hang fire
October 25, 2013, 04:41 AM
I am, I got into it from necessity because of my two jap guns, my french gun and now most recently a M95 steyr. the steyr with handloads is right on par with my M1 garand and slightly better than my mosin nagants.

I have yet to shoot the 7.7 japanese enough to warrant reloads, I've just been putting hornady custom through it. it's about as accurate as my 1903 springfield and enfield number 4 though the zero if off and I haven't taken the time to drift the sight.

the 6.5 jap is a tack driver no matter what I put in it. it's a carbine so velocity sucks compared to the long rifles but I regularly ring an oxygen tank at 400 yards with that little gun off sandbags. it is easily the most accurate milsurp I own(second only to a 1903A4 sniper I used to own).

the 7.5 french sucks. it's zero is way off and the only way to adjust it is to get a rear sight with the peep drilled in a different spot which is impossible to find. I never shoot it, I've been trying to sell it for several months... no takers.


Mas36: For windage the front sight is only soft soldered in the dovetail, little heat and it can be easily drifted.

The rear sight for 100 yard or less elevation, can be shimmed to lower aperture.

hang fire
October 25, 2013, 04:50 AM
I don't think your friend is too much of an expert....and likely that brass is berdan primed. Pretty much useless in the reloading world...yea you can do it but why on something so common as a 3006.
Methinks you speak out of turn there.

Most reloading books will caution against loading thicker wall military surplus boxer primed brass with loads listed for commercial brass, without working slowly up to them.

tahunua001
October 25, 2013, 01:03 PM
Mas36: For windage the front sight is only soft soldered in the dovetail, little heat and it can be easily drifted.

The rear sight for 100 yard or less elevation, can be shimmed to lower aperture.

this is only on certain guns. my gun is not part of that group.

hang fire
October 25, 2013, 07:36 PM
this is only on certain guns. my gun is not part of that group.
If it is a Mas-36, perhaps you could enlighten me as to the differences.

If you are referring to rear sight, merely press down on aperture and then shim as required with paper, plastic, brass, or what ever.

tahunua001
October 25, 2013, 09:34 PM
and you do this to fix 8 inch right deviation at 25 yards?

hang fire
October 25, 2013, 11:39 PM
and you do this to fix 8 inch right deviation at 25 yards?
The answer to your horizontal question was as posted here: Mas36: For windage the front sight is only soft soldered in the dovetail, little heat and it can be easily drifted.

lencac
October 27, 2013, 08:57 PM
Anyone else into older Military firearms, & reloading to bring out there inherent accuracy?

This must be a rhetorical question :neener:

There might be a couple of folks who do that :o

If you enjoyed reading about "Anyone into MilSurps and reloading for them?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!