Shooting the Spirit Moose


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Black Butte
October 9, 2013, 07:13 PM
How do you feel about these hunters killing the "spirit moose"?

http://www.grindtv.com/outdoor/excursions/post/hunters-spark-outrage-by-killing-white-spirit-moose/

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Robert
October 9, 2013, 07:35 PM
Three hunters were within their rights when they killed a rare albino moose last week in the Nova Scotia wilderness
There you go. Would I have taken the animal, I don't think so. But they were legal so if they wanted to I don't really have a problem with it.

Sam1911
October 9, 2013, 07:56 PM
Seems they're being awfully nice about it to the folks who're upset.

And also is another FINE example of why it really is a terrible idea to go publishing everything about your life for all the world to see. There's a little too much disclosure/bragging/advertising/openness/sharing in the world these days.

Kind of like a toddler with a machete, folks really haven't figured out how to properly/safely use social media just yet. Gonna be the death of many. Heck, it already has been the death of some, no doubt.

Sam Cade
October 9, 2013, 08:17 PM
The Moose needed to be killed, and the sooner the better. Albinism is NOT a survival trait.

gspn
October 9, 2013, 09:57 PM
It was legal to kill...end of story. If you start 'not killing' animals because someone, somewhere will be upset then you won't be able to hunt anything...period.

Sucks for that tribe but their way of life was on the downhill long before these guys shot a white moose.

surjimmy
October 9, 2013, 10:08 PM
Legal kill, I'm all for it and they dang sure wouldn't be getting my hide.

Outlaw Man
October 9, 2013, 11:27 PM
The Moose needed to be killed, and the sooner the better. Albinism is NOT a survival trait.
This. Or put in a zoo. Aside from a few critters north of the Arctic circle, being an albino will get you killed by a predator PDQ.

I have to say, that would make a very unique mount.

HarcyPervin
October 10, 2013, 02:19 PM
I see no problem with taking the moose. I'm also pretty impressed with the hunters making nice about it with the tribe. They had zero legal obligation to do so, but it's a classy move.

I hear everyone talk about how landowners don't let people use their land anymore because so many have had bad experiences with disrespectful hunters in the past. It would seem that a story coming out of a good-guy hunter isn't the worst thing that could happen.

Patocazador
October 10, 2013, 05:50 PM
If the tribe has a problem with it, they should lobby the Provincial government to make "spirit" animals off limits.

I have a hunch that they wouldn't have raised a stink if one of the tribe members killed it.

montanaoffroader
October 11, 2013, 12:10 AM
In the article the hunters indicated that they would not have taken the moose if they had been aware of it's significance to the local natives.

Also, it does not appear to me that the hunters are in any way behaving in an irresponsible, unethical or unsportsmanlike manner.

If the tribe has a problem with it, they should lobby the Provincial government to make "spirit" animals off limits.

Perhaps this would be the best approach, ask the government to change the hunting regulations regarding albino animals.

Sam1911
October 11, 2013, 07:55 AM
Oh jeeeeez. I pulled up the weather channel site this morning and this "story" is one of their featured videos!

As I said...
And also is another FINE example of why it really is a terrible idea to go publishing everything about your life for all the world to see. There's a little too much disclosure/bragging/advertising/openness/sharing in the world these days.

Kind of like a toddler with a machete, folks really haven't figured out how to properly/safely use social media just yet. Gonna be the death of many. Heck, it already has been the death of some, no doubt.

We've seen it with pro sports guys and Donald Trump's kids and who knows who all else. Post a few "Me The Mighty Hunter" pics for all your fans and anyone else who just happens by and spend months dealing with the ignorant masses bombing your FB page, the media, your sponsors, etc. with hate and ridicule.

Post a few shots or vids of your fun night out or afternoon of sillyness and discover that you've just published yourself violating the law, or embarrassing your family, or ticking of your employer and getting canned, or as in this case, greatly angering a native tribe you probably didn't know existed and finding yourself pressured into making sheepish public apologies and giving up your kill.

A wise man once said, "never miss an opportunity to keep your (daggone) mouth shut."

Posting information about yourself opens you up to all kinds of vulnerability, whether legal or not, as these guys and many others have found out.

Stay off the flippin' radar!

Dframe
October 11, 2013, 11:41 AM
Legal yes. A good idea? HELL NO!
They have just given the PETA types a huge PR victory!

boogieman
October 11, 2013, 12:08 PM
They have just given the PETA types a huge PR victory!
I respectfully disagree. The actions of the hunters after they found reflects favorably on all hunters.
I probably would have shot the moose had I seen it, I would also share the spoils of the kill with the tribe that has laid claim to it.

Cosmoline
October 11, 2013, 12:41 PM
They were right about the bad luck. Best not to spit in too many eyes even if your decisions are logical and legal.

Patocazador
October 11, 2013, 05:42 PM
The guys did NOTHING wrong. Everyone should get off their backs.

Sam1911
October 11, 2013, 06:52 PM
"The guys did NOTHING wrong" ... except let their faces and their harvest get plastered all over social media and get famous in a bad way. :)

Patocazador
October 11, 2013, 08:18 PM
That's their fault????

If I kill a white bear, deer, moose, etc. and post the photo here, am I the bad guy?

Easy answer = NO.

Sam1911
October 11, 2013, 08:28 PM
Nope. Not a bad guy. Just possibly opening yourself to more unpleasantness than you'd like.


These guys aren't bad guys, and I don't know exactly how their story "got out." Maybe the hunting company posted it or maybe they had it up on FaceBook right away. Either way, they assuredly now wish they could put the djinni back in the bottle or the cat back in the bag, so to speak.

I think they're poster boys for exercising the most discretion possible. A cautionary tale for all of us.

Art Eatman
October 11, 2013, 08:29 PM
While I understand Sam's point, I figure that as long as what I am doing is to the best of my knowledge legal, ethical and moral, what I offer my detractors is the Royal Order of the Rigid Digit. Granted that I'm old, craniky, retired and independently not-broke.`

SimplyChad
October 12, 2013, 02:20 AM
That would look great next to my fire place and given the chance would be there.

morcey2
October 15, 2013, 11:18 PM
At least no one has shot the spirit squirrel yet. :neener:

buck460XVR
October 16, 2013, 08:59 AM
Similar to an incident that happened here in Wisconsin last year. Some out of state hunters shot an albino deer that folks in the area had befriended and protected. Generally albino deer are protected in the state from hunters, but this was in a CWD area where the restriction had been lifted. Altho the shooting was legal, the landowner had warned them about the deer. The fallout was much the same.....on all the local news broadcasts and in all the papers in the state. While legal.....it still did not promote a positive image for hunters. Something we all need to think about.

Paul7
October 23, 2013, 06:05 PM
Tell the Indians to shove it, I for one wouldn't pass up a legal shot on a rare animal like that just because of their superstitions.

boogieman
October 27, 2013, 09:27 PM
Tell the Indians to shove it, I for one wouldn't pass up a legal shot on a rare animal like that just because of their superstitions.
What a rotten way to put it. Meat is easy to come by, favorable public opinion on hunters is not. We are stewards of the land, animals, and men who came before us. Not to mention our sons and daughters that we hope will follow us.

Oleson
October 28, 2013, 06:21 AM
We had the same situation here in Norway a couple of years ago. The moose was of course named "Albin" by the city-dwellers... The hunters who had the terrain said that they would not shoot it. But a guest hunter from Sweden did. :D The papers were full of deaththreats from the vegans... Who were probably so anemic that they couldn't wrestle a carrot.
Anyway, the whole deal died off on it's own.
But as we have seen more than once, if you do something extraordinary while hunting: shut up.

Art Eatman
October 28, 2013, 09:13 AM
Regardless of superstion or color or whatever, the critter is gonna be wormfood in a few years. Seems to me that the argument is over who gets to immortalize the animal and how.

So you shoot an unusual critter and have it mounted or the hide made into a rug or whatever: That's as close to immortality as any wild animal ever gets.

Outlaw Man
October 29, 2013, 11:06 AM
I understand trying to convey a positive image for hunters, but let's be honest. You're going to hack off a few people regardless of what you do. If you're that concerned about what radical groups think about you, either don't hunt or, like Sam said, at least keep your mouth shut about it.

As far as the natives who are upset about this particular instance (I'm not lumping them in with the radical groups I mentioned), it's a tough situation. The hunters have offered to try to make up for it, and if it was that big a deal you should have put it in a zoo or wildlife reserve.

Paul7
November 2, 2013, 03:22 PM
What a rotten way to put it. Meat is easy to come by, favorable public opinion on hunters is not. We are stewards of the land, animals, and men who came before us. Not to mention our sons and daughters that we hope will follow us.
If the Indians don't like it then they should campaign to change the game laws. Their ideas aren't more important than the rest of us.

buck460XVR
November 3, 2013, 12:40 PM
If the Indians don't like it then they should campaign to change the game laws. Their ideas aren't more important than the rest of us.

Since this happened in Nova Scotia and not India, it was the indigenous Mi'kmaq people that were upset, not Indians.....:rolleyes:

Remember my first post in this thread about the shooting of an albino deer? It was legal game because it was in a CWD zone. The state now proposes to make albinos in CWD zones a protected species just like they are in the rest of the state. This proposal has nuttin' to do with biology or game management, but solely because of the negative perception of shooting a rare animal. We as hunters in the lower 48 are a minority. We are allowed to hunt only because the majority of folks that do not hunt allow us to. Most of the hunting opportunities we have lost in the last few years other than habitat loss and lack of game has to do with negative perceptions of hunters by that majority. Most all of us that have hunted for more than a few years have lost a good hunting spot because of the actions of another irresponsible hunter. What they did may have been legal, but it upset the landowner to the point that they no longer allow hunting on their property. The attitude that whatever is legal goes and the perception of others of us does not impact us is foolishness. While it's legal to drive around for weeks with a dead deer on top your car, does it give any of us a positive image? While it's legal to wound game, lose it to coyotes and then brag about it in the bar, does it make us look responsible and ethical? In the home town where I grew up, a local KOA campground fed the local deer. They started feeding a small nubbin' buck one year and four years later he was a true trophy. Every one in town knew him and he would come up to folks that called his name. Local dirtball had permission to hunt the farm next to the campground. Lured "bucky" across the fence and then shot him @ point blank range with his bow while patrons of the campground watched. Perfectly legal. Did nuttin' but harm to the image of the rest of us local hunters. Ended up closing many spots to us in the area because of his negative actions. His greed and desire to have a "wall-hanger" meant more than ethics and the future of hunting and it impacted more folks than just him.

I think the hunters that killed the "Spirit Moose" did not know the impact that shooting it would have. I also think they are truly saddened by their actions and are doing whatever they can to make up for it. Kudos for them. Ethics is not always just doin' what is legal. It's doing the "right" thing when no one else is around.

Patocazador
November 4, 2013, 02:56 PM
Albinos are inferior animals. Vision problems galore. Wisconsin is nuts to protect them, especially CWD deer. Your DNR should be commited.

buck460XVR
November 4, 2013, 07:23 PM
Albinos are inferior animals. Vision problems galore. Wisconsin is nuts to protect them, especially CWD deer. Your DNR should be commited.


As I said, the decision to protect them has nuttin' to do with biology or game management. But folks enjoy seein' them and get upset when they're shot. There actually is a pretty good size herd of them in the Boulder Junction area that has had national attention. They bring in tourists from all over the world. Seems they're worth more to the folks up there alive than dead. Wisconsin's DNR does just fine. Look at the amount of trophy bucks, the amount of deer taken and the numerous opportunities to hunt deer in the state. Then compare that to your state, or virtually any other state in the Union. We really don't need to shoot of the white deer. We can't even shoot off all the brown deer than need to be controlled. If allowin' a few white deer to live makes folks happy and easier to get along with, and gives us sportsmen a positive image to those folks, in the majority, that don't hunt......so be it.

Ghost Deer of Boulder Junction (http://boulderjct.org/recreation-trails/birding-wildlife/white-deer-the-albino-deer-of-boulder-junction-wisconsin/)

http://boulderjct.org/bigmusky/wp-content/gallery/albino-deer/the-albino-buck.jpg

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