Hog Hunting in Texas


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Country_Soldier
October 16, 2013, 04:32 AM
Hello THR,

Any tips for hunting hogs in Texas? Currently stationed at Fort Hood, before getting there was excited to here about hog over population :D, but hunted there since late last year and didn't see one hog :mad: , what do you look for when you are picking your hog hunting sites? Game calls in particular (asking this one because I tried a hog squealer and the only thing that came to me was a young cow)? Scent attractant or no? all the basic stuff.

Any tips on hog hunting in Texas would be greatly appreciated. Thanx THR

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Patocazador
October 16, 2013, 10:18 AM
I think hogs are about as smart as coyotes. If they've been hunted much, they are probably nocturnal.

I had a trapped wild hog that tamed down and would roll over on command (sometimes) to get her belly rubbed. She would always come when called. They are smart.

calaverasslim
October 16, 2013, 10:54 AM
Yep, they're smart. They have figgered out that humans can't really see in the dark so that's when they generally come out to play.

Find yourself a big Pecan orchard and stake it out. They are all over the pecan areas here. Big batch about 9am yesterday. Bout 25-30

KMatch
October 16, 2013, 11:06 AM
They will always be in charge. You might lure them into the area with feeders, but that takes time. Scents, calls, doodads, are all over rated. They work when hogs are interested and already on site. No pigs? All the toys on the market won't bring them in.

Start by looking for rooting of the ground. Pigs like easy food and water. Look around water holes.

Plan on night hunting as that's more the norm. Lights can vary. I hunt in a busy area so lighting isn't an issue and rarely scares them. Quieter locations might require less light, or shades of red or green. The red and green lights cast less shadows the pigs can't/barely see so they are less afraid. In a more laid back area like mine, I can get away with a high powered spot light. This is rare but due to my surroundings, I can get away with much more than most. I do notice they are less bothered by LEDs than halogen bulbs.

Don't get too wrapped up in making stink bait. If they're around, they'll attack plain corn out of the bag all night. If they're not around, stink bait won't matter. If you have coons hitting the bait, leave them alone as hogs follow their scent to the food.

Don't be afraid to wait around for more to show up if you shoot one. I usually can see others 20 minutes after a shot. They might run, but if they're a mile away when you shoot some up close, those a mile away don't know which way to run and usually head your way if that was their intentions to start with. They don't just wake up and eat around home. They travel all night so if your spot is on their travel map, a shot here and their won't likely detour them far.

To hunt them at night or without a license, word is you need a landowner's permission to remove his nuisance. Otherwise, a license is required I hear. I dunno... I'm removing nuisance hogs the landowner wants taken out. Be careful if you plan to hunt other locations as the laws change when hunting them otherwise. General hunting requires a license and no night hunting as I understand it. Removing them as a nuisance, anything legal goes - if you can shoot/light/stalk/trap/snare/explode legally, you can apply it to hogs with the landowner's blessing. No blessing? Regular hunting rules take place.

Kill all you see. There's plenty more to take their place.

der Teufel
October 16, 2013, 03:21 PM
To hunt them at night or without a license, word is you need a landowner's permission to remove his nuisance. Otherwise, a license is required I hear. I dunno... I'm removing nuisance hogs the landowner wants taken out.

I think that has changed as of this year. Feral hogs used to be categorized as Non-Game animals which, if they were damaging (deprecating) the land, could be taken without a license by a landowner or landowner's agent. In the 2013-2014 Texas Hunting Regulations (ref pages 76-77) they've been reclassified as Exotics and a license is required.

If I'm reading and interpreting things incorrectly, someone please let me know.
--

yzguy87
October 16, 2013, 03:27 PM
This should help:
http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=449721

It's a sticky at the top of the page.

KMatch
October 17, 2013, 10:36 AM
I think that has changed as of this year. Feral hogs used to be categorized as Non-Game animals which, if they were damaging (deprecating) the land, could be taken without a license by a landowner or landowner's agent. In the 2013-2014 Texas Hunting Regulations (ref pages 76-77) they've been reclassified as Exotics and a license is required.

If I'm reading and interpreting things incorrectly, someone please let me know.
--

I still see the exceptions clause listed below I follow.

http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/regulations/outdoor-annual/licenses/hunting-licenses-and-permits

der Teufel
October 17, 2013, 10:28 PM
I still see the exceptions clause listed below I follow.

http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/regulations/outdoor-annual/licenses/hunting-licenses-and-permits

Okay, I see it on page 29, in the General Requirement/Restrictions section. I was looking in the section titled Hunting Regulations and not finding it.

Thanks!
--

Flintknapper
October 18, 2013, 12:13 AM
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^



Feral Hogs have been classified as 'Exotics' for a number of years now.

UNLESS you have the permission of the land owner, the land owner's agent or lessee of the land to take DEPREDATING hogs (not just hogs present or passing through a property), then you MUST have a hunting license.

AND in either case.... you need to have the permission of the Landowner/Agent/Lessee in order to 'possess' the carcass of the animal.

So make sure you cross your T’s and dot your I’s before you go hog hunting.

An overzealous Game Warden could make things pretty miserable for you otherwise.

For most part, State Officials, Land Owners and Lease Holders are of one accord: Kill hogs at every opportunity, by any (legal) means available.

You are not likely to run afoul with a Game Warden…(as concerns hogs), BUT having a valid hunting license avoids any ‘dispute’ that could arise with regards to whether or not you have permission (and can readily prove it) to hunt the land under the exception available.

A Texas hunting license (even a non-resident license) is not expensive, just GET ONE.



http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/regulations/outdoor-annual/hunting/nongame-and-other-species

Exotic Animals and Fowl

Exotic animal refers to grass-eating or plant-eating, single-hoofed or cloven-hoofed mammals that are not indigenous or native to Texas and are known as ungulates, including animals from the deer and antelope families that landowners have introduced into this state.

Includes, but is not limited to feral hog, Aoudad sheep, Axis deer, Elk, Sika deer, Fallow deer, Blackbuck antelope, Nilgai antelope, and Russian boar. Exotic fowl refers to any avian species that is not indigenous to this state, including ratites (emu, ostrich, rhea, cassowary, etc.).

There are no state bag or possession limits or closed seasons on exotic animals or fowl on private property.

It is against the law to:

Hunt an exotic without a valid hunting license.
Hunt an exotic on a public road or right-of-way.
Hunt an exotic without the landowner's permission.
Possess an exotic or the carcass of an exotic without the owner's consent.

Penalty: A person who violates these laws commits an offense that is a Class A Parks and Wildlife Code misdemeanor ($500-$4000 and/or up to one year in jail).


The Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC) regulates the movement of feral swine for disease-control purposes. For more information please call TAHC at (800) 550-8242 or visit the TAHC Web site.

Country_Soldier
October 18, 2013, 06:45 AM
sorry it took me so long to get back to my post, deployed right now, was out all day yesturday doing some field work.

One issue I think that I may be having is that I don't know if there are hogs in the area, I know there are alot of cattle (Fort Hood allows cattle ranchers to graze on the land that is owned by Fort Hood, but outside of the main post), but know that I got an idea of what to look for, when I get back I can get a map and start plotting some points. Will start with areas with more water, think there is a creek in some low lands that pass through one of the training areas.

Also saw the post about the lights, did a quick google search and came up with this:

http://www.elusivewildlife.com/products.htm?section=22&p=productMore&iProduct=274

It is meant to go on the bottom of a feeder, but it comes with hooks and such to be hung from trees, I was thinking this, some corn mixed with hog attractant, and maybe a scope mounted light (if needed (http://www.elusivewildlife.com/products.htm?section=22&p=productMore&iProduct=198)) and that might do the trick. Looking into a stake-down ground blind. Fort Hood sometimes doesn't let you put up feeders or permanent stands and blinds (that and I really can't afford to purchase or maintain a feeder). I know I'm kinda at the disadvantage by not having a lot of the things others use, but willing to try hard to get what I'm after.

Now here is something that I have to ask, I have a hog squealer as I have said before, how would that help, in my mind I would think that if I heard another hog in distress I wouldn't want to go near the area, but I don't know what hogs think, are they that intelegent? should I leave hog calls at home? If my assumptions are false please shed alittle light on that please.

Again, thank you everyone, won't get to put this stuff into practice till I get stateside again, but at least I can start preparing for when I do get home

falmike
October 18, 2013, 07:20 AM
Go by the Rod and Gun to get your TX license...it's free for Active Duty. You will have to pay for your Hood permits but they are not bad.

The base biologist's office is almost next door so you could talk to them About where hogs are being seen.

Mike

Country_Soldier
October 18, 2013, 07:33 AM
falmike,
Base Biologists? Didn't know we had something like that on Hood. You say by the Rod and Gun club, same area as the game wardens office right? I think sportsmens complex and game wardens office in the little area next to the Air Assualt course right?

Patocazador
October 18, 2013, 01:33 PM
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
An overzealous Game Warden could make things pretty miserable for you otherwise.

Is there any other kind?

der Teufel
October 18, 2013, 02:38 PM
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
An overzealous Game Warden could make things pretty miserable for you otherwise.

Is there any other kind?

Even without the smiley I detect the humor. As for me, I've talked with several game wardens in the past few years and every one was pretty reasonable. Of course, I'm hunting hogs exclusively and I get a license, so I don't feel I have anything to worry about.

Actually, I could very easily hunt without a license. I manage about 700 acres of land for a friend. He pays me for that (I show the income on my tax return), and I deduct some expenses. I do more than just eliminate hogs. I mow, plow, repair fences, represent the land owner with the folks who lease hunting rights, etc. It would be quite easy to claim that I am the landowner's agent but I find it simpler to just get a hunting license. That way there's no question about whether the hogs are deprecating the property or any other issues. Besides, license fees are one of the main sources of revenue for TP&W.

Also, one of these days I'm going to take a little time off and go squirrel hunting. For that one definitely needs a hunting license. Of course I've been saying that for several years, but hey, it could happen!

AKElroy
October 18, 2013, 02:44 PM
Is there any other kind?

Oh you bet. Most here in my neck of the woods in the texas hill country are salt of the earth. If you aren't violating, they are your friend. When my then 11 year old son shot his first deer, they were all over him with praise, wanting to know the distance of the shot, took pictures, gave him a certificate, invited him to a BBQ dinner. Very cool. I've been stopped numerous times and every encounter has been positive. Of course, violators may have a different experience.

Country_Soldier
October 19, 2013, 07:52 AM
What would you all say is resonable for hunting on someone elses land? If heard that most want you to lease the land rights to hunt it, but in Kentucky if you ask the land owner they usually don't mind, just as long as your willing to share half your harvest, which I never minded, they was kind enough to let he hunt there for free

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