New to Reloading question


PDA






shekarchi
October 16, 2013, 04:12 PM
first: I do not have a chrony [yet] and am very careful not to go near the max charges...
Question is:
Is it considered generally safe to interchange bullet brands [of same weight, similar BC, similar shape] in load recipes?
I am not asking about duplicating a certain level of performance, velocity, or accuracy, etc... just want to know if e.g. the load asks for a Nosler 165 g spitzer... can I safely use a Hornady 165 grain spitzer instead?

If you enjoyed reading about "New to Reloading question" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
jwrowland77
October 16, 2013, 04:20 PM
Absolutely. You'll need to find your OAL again with the new/different bullet though. And of course, start back at the min and work your way up again in a new workup.

bob4
October 16, 2013, 04:23 PM
Short answer I think is no.

I only load for my 270 at this point. I am surprised at the differences in the load data from 1 130 grain bullet to another, even using the same powder. Example: 130 grain bullet and same powder.. Lyman tells me 58. Nosler tells me 59. max .. Sierra tells me 59.2 max. And as I approach max loads I can feel it in the felt recoil, so I ALWAYS check the load data.

joustin
October 16, 2013, 04:42 PM
Yes for the most part, as stated OAL may change etc and work back up. The differences in the load manuals is due to testing methods/rifles used and lawyers. I load ALL 55 and 62gr 223 Rem bullets with the same 24.5gr H335/WC844 but change the OAL as needed. They are all accurate enough for plinking/hunting.
For match grade there can be major differences. An example, the Sierra 69gr Match King is somewhat short and stubby, the 68 gr Hornady BTHP is much longer (same length as the 75gr BTHP). There is no difference in OAL as they are all set to mag length but the room in the brass is impacted so charges are 1-3 grains lighter for similar velocities.
Also, all copper alloy bullets are longer and lighter and the load data can be wildly different.

mjsdwash
October 16, 2013, 04:44 PM
yes, thats the advantage of starting loads. If the weights are the same, and the profile is the same, or very close, it wont make much difference. Usually its a good idea to keep closer to the maximum overall length, and start light when subing

shekarchi
October 16, 2013, 04:48 PM
great advice y'all
thanks

gamestalker
October 16, 2013, 05:59 PM
If you are seating up close to the lands, then re-working the charge is necessary. But other wise you can pretty much just go with the same data provided you aren't operating above mid range.

GS

shekarchi
October 17, 2013, 11:37 AM
here is what Hornady Tech support said to this question:

It is ok to do this but you should back off 5% from your current load and work the load back up with the "other" bullet as it may have a higher drag factor so you will reach max. pressure with the same load data but before you did with the previous bullet.

steve4102
October 17, 2013, 01:02 PM
Short answer I think is no.

I only load for my 270 at this point. I am surprised at the differences in the load data from 1 130 grain bullet to another, even using the same powder. Example: 130 grain bullet and same powder.. Lyman tells me 58. Nosler tells me 59. max .. Sierra tells me 59.2 max. And as I approach max loads I can feel it in the felt recoil, so I ALWAYS check the load data.

The differences you see in data can be the result of the bullet design, it can also be the different lot numbers of poewder used,different lot numers of Primer, altitude, temperature, case capacity, most often it is the result of the testing medium used, or it could be all or none of the the above.

In reality the "short answer" is Yes. It is perfectly acceptable to use published data of Same Weigh bullets of Similar Construction from different Bullet Manufacturers as long as you Start Low and Work Up.

If it was not acceptable, then bullet manufacturers like Remington, Montana Gold, Armscore, Missouri Bullets, Penn, and even our own home grown cast bullets would be useless as there is little to no load data to support these and many other brands of bullets.

Arkansas Paul
October 17, 2013, 01:08 PM
I'm with gamestalker. If its not a near max load and you're just seating to the recommended OAL, then go for it. Of course if you change the style of bullet you really need data for that bullet, but you prolly already know that.

And don't worry about not having a chrono. I don't have one. I don't have a clue what the velocity of my loads are. But you know what? The deer flop when I pull the trigger so I don't care. :)

stavman11
October 17, 2013, 01:17 PM
Im like joustin


I run primarily 55gr in my .223, and use about 5 diff bullets.... all loaded with the Same 25gr of WC844 and get very similar results..

I have also tested with .357 and 9mm and do similar with those.... but nothing is loaded to MAX so it hasnt been an issue

targetshooter22
October 18, 2013, 10:50 AM
Importance of OAL is pretty well covered, so I won't belabor that. I do/did this all the time with 223, 243, and 7mm. One thing I noticed was that even if the bullet weighs the same, it doesn't always fly the same. Longer noses and boat tails and soft points and plastic points all make some kind of difference. Therefore it was beneficial to back off and work up in powders again to find the "sweet" spot with a given powder/bullet combination.

FWIW, the Winchester, Savages, and CZ's all like to run "hot" right around max published data (which varies from book to book and year to year). The milsurp Mauser liked to run less hot; go figure.

shekarchi
October 18, 2013, 11:10 AM
I think I got the information I needed - and more... which is icing on the cake
Thanks all

witchhunter
October 19, 2013, 09:30 PM
With a different brand bullet of the same weight you probably will get a different Point of Impact at your sight in distance. Not a problem, just adjust your scope. The other thing that might happen is your rifle will not like the other brand of bullet of the same weight and shape....some rifles like a certain bullet, powder or certain velocity. You might have to work up again.

If you enjoyed reading about "New to Reloading question" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!