Worst Revolver You Ever Bought ?


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Gun Master
October 19, 2013, 05:36 PM
I have bought a few semi-autos that I was disappointed in. On the other hand, I can't think of any revolver that I had serious issues with. Have any of you ever had a "I wish I hadn't bought this :banghead: thang" wheelgun ?

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RickRandom
October 19, 2013, 05:44 PM
POS Arminius .22 revolver with pot metal frame.

HiCap1
October 19, 2013, 06:04 PM
Taurus 9mm snubbie. Back to the factory twice; would not fire more that twice per cylinder. Factory "fixed" it a third time, and it was sold to someone else. Back to the factory; still wouldn't fire more than twice per cylinder. I now have a great Charter 9mm Pit Bull.

HiCap1

gspn
October 19, 2013, 06:26 PM
I have yet to own a bad one. Ruger, S&W, and Colt...mostly stuff made from the 1960's to the 1990's.

Lizard1911
October 19, 2013, 06:38 PM
Ruger Redhawk in 44 mag. Had to have it. Most inaccurate piece of work, EVER. Wish I knew then it was likely just a bad crown.

PabloJ
October 19, 2013, 06:45 PM
Late 60s .22 H&R with fancy key that fit into butt of handle.:barf:

Gun Master
October 19, 2013, 06:49 PM
I have yet to own a bad one. Ruger, S&W, and Colt...mostly stuff made from the 1960's to the 1990's.
Generically, I agree with you on "all of the above". Usually, S&W first, then Colt &/or Ruger, depending on model. I would like for Colt to "step up to the plate", currently and not just rely on their name or reputation. S&W, my favorite, should take note and not "drop the ball". Good luck to all.:)

barnetmill
October 19, 2013, 07:00 PM
herters .22 guide revolver. It was inaccurate. The hammer block mechanism failed when a piece of metal fell out of the action. It did however always go bang. The price IIRC new was $25 mail order in old days.

RussB
October 19, 2013, 07:09 PM
Taurus stainless 22 9-shot revolver. Timing was off, and the cylinder didn't line up with the barrel! Traded it to a gun shop for a big loss

spm
October 19, 2013, 07:26 PM
I have yet to own a bad one. Ruger, S&W, and Colt...mostly stuff made from the 1960's to the 1990's.

+1
Same brands, same mfr. dates.

spm

Buckeye71
October 19, 2013, 07:31 PM
A no-name .22 magnum bought from a pawn shop. Never fired it. Turns out it had a metal defect in the top strap, so I was afraid to fire it. Anxiously awaiting for a "buy back". It makes a good paper weight though.

Coal Dragger
October 19, 2013, 08:06 PM
Dan Wesson .44 Magnum. Steaming pile of poo with horrible fit and finish. Maybe one of the last ones before they went out of business before CZ bought them a few years later.

Longhorn 76
October 19, 2013, 08:35 PM
Smith. It was a 25-5. An unforced, special edition (125th anniversary or something) given to me by a retired ranger. The front cylinder latch wouldn't latch. The cylinder would bind on two cylinders in double action. The hammer rubbed the side plate so bad it was galling. Cylinder bore to .462, barrel to .452 (never would shoot well).

That was okay, it was a gift.

The worst thing was, since it had a lot of sentimental value, I sent it back with a blank check to get it fixed. Smith told me that since it was a special model, they wouldn't work on it?????

They will never get a dime of mine.

tubeshooter
October 19, 2013, 08:36 PM
I got burned once on a no-name .22 revolver. This was a pretty good while ago, sometime back in the '90s, and I didn't know all that much about what to look for.

The gun would not fire shells reliably in double action mode, and was only marginally better in single action. It also was very difficult to extract the empties.

It also seemed to show signs of dry firing when I looked at it closely - after the fact, of course. All chambers showed signs of peening to various degrees.



Biggest waste of a gun permit I have ever had the displeasure of dealing with. I tried to get a gunsmith to do what he could, but there was nothing that could be done (he tried). Got a loan from the evil pawn shop for about half of what I paid and never went back for it. Lesson learned.

beag_nut
October 19, 2013, 08:54 PM
Charter Arms Mag Pug, recent manufacture (3 years old). Shot so low I had to machine down the front sight to hit paper. Appears to be common to them. Also, the frame screws constantly loosen. And there are chatter marks in the rifling (!). A POS.

Kayaker 1960
October 19, 2013, 09:47 PM
I've only bought 2 S&W and 1 Ruger. No regrets here.

frankiestoys
October 19, 2013, 10:17 PM
Owned a EAA Windicator really wanted to like it after about a 100 rds it locked up and the trigger only worked in SA only, I sent it back for repair and it was returned quickly I sold it and and bought a SP the Windicator was junk compared to 101 for me its Ruger ,Colt or Smith

exiledtoIA
October 19, 2013, 10:20 PM
Toss up between a Taurus 38SP and a Dan Wesson in 357Mag.
Taurus shot itself loose using 148 gr wadcutters ( factory Remington loads ).
Dan Wesson kept working the barrels loose. Sent it back to be fixed twice before giving up on it.

CajunBass
October 19, 2013, 10:48 PM
The only one I can think of off the top of my head was a cheap copy of a "Colt Navy .36 back powder revolver. I probable didn't take good enough care of it, which I'm sure caused some problems.

Never had a bad cat-ridge gun.

GyMac
October 19, 2013, 10:52 PM
I have owned several Colt, many S&W's, and one Ruger, Dan Wesson and Charter Arms. All worked just fine and I regret everyone I traded or sold.

EnsignJimmy
October 19, 2013, 10:53 PM
My "worst" was a Taurus 7-shot .357 Magnum with a 6" barrel. It wasn't actually a bad revolver, mind you ... though there was one load where it kept piercing the primers; but that was the load and not the revolver.

Why was it my worst? Well, I didn't keep it long because I decided I liked .45 Colt better than I liked .357 Magnum ... so I ultimately traded it in for a Marlin .45 Colt rifle. In fact, the only .357 Magnum revolver I own these days is a 2.25" Ruger SP-101.

Twiki357
October 20, 2013, 02:46 AM
The only bad revolver I ever had is a Beretta Stampede single action in 357 mag, probably made by Uberti for Beretta. The action malfunctions in that when the revolver is at full cock, it can not be let back down, all the way or even to half cock position. Beretta has a crappie warranty that’s only good for a year and they want $75 to tell me how much it will cost to fix it. The first, only and the last Beretta I will ever have.

Tophernj
October 20, 2013, 06:02 AM
Taurus Poly Protector .357mag snubbie.

I bought it on a whim at an NRA dinner. Got a decent deal on it. After 50 rounds, the timing locked up so bad I could barely open it. And, I found pieces of the bullet's jacket on my shooting table. Sent it back to them and sold it on it's return. Only lost 40 bucks on the deal so not too bad. Unfortunately, the way it works in NJ, it was another month before I could pick anything else up. Live and learn. Smith or Ruger from here on out.

C

Stainz
October 20, 2013, 06:20 AM
http://i171.photobucket.com/albums/u307/Stainz_2007/002-3.jpg

I knew it was a POS when I bought it to 'share' .32 S&WL/H&RM duties with my treasured 632 Pro. I wasn't disappointed - it really is a POS! A HS shop class could make a 'finer' replica of a revolver. It's DA pull rivals that of the worst of my 1895 Nagants' DA pull. Actually, I am being kind! Two Benjamins won't get you much from a gunstore these days - other than their muted laughter as you leave with that turkey.

Stainz

DIXIEDOG
October 20, 2013, 07:29 AM
Rossi .357 mag stainless revolver....the revolver was a great looking piece....on looks alone I'd give it a 10....looked better than most of the Smith/Ruger revolvers I've owned. The real problem was with the barrel, the finish in rifling itself was terrible so it would lead up something fierce and cleaning it was a bear.:cuss:

Bo
October 20, 2013, 07:49 AM
Taurus 941 22 Magnum 8 shot revolver. Cylinder locked up after 16 rds. Cleaned it, fired another 16 rds., locked again. Also had a 40 lbs. trigger pull, (well it seemed like it).
Sent it back to Taurus for repair. Came back, fired O.K. but, wouldn't eject spent shells. Took a hundred dollar loss and traded it for a new Ruger Mark III Target with the 6 7/8" barrel. Love it, no regrets.

hardluk1
October 20, 2013, 09:10 AM
I have 4 DW revolvers and two Taurus revolvers . All 25 years old plus and all run just fine. If you want a 22 revolver to have a nice lite trigger pull then don't buy a small frame revolver .

gunlaw
October 20, 2013, 11:05 AM
I didn't really buy it, my brother in law threw it in when I bought his poly tech AK/S a few years ago, but it's an Iver Johnson 67 Viking. It actually shot pretty well but the rear sight blade fell out. Anybody know where I can find a replacement? Numerich does not have them.

bannockburn
October 20, 2013, 11:39 AM
Colt Agent at the time when Colt was going through one of their many labor disputes. The gun had this cheap parkerizing finish as to conceal the lack of any metal polishing and hand fitting. Gaps between the metal were noticeable and the cylinder and crane were improperly fitted causing a major problem with complete cylinder rotation.

Jim NE
October 20, 2013, 11:51 AM
Looking at some of the responses, I'm wondering if some people aren't listing their "most disappointing" revolvers rather than "worst". :)

My worst revolver was no disappointment...it's low quality was apparent from the get go. So why did I buy it?? The price was amazing! Actually, I can't remember the exact price. I only remember that it was less money than my brand new Raven .25, which was $40.:)

It was an RG, imported through Florida, and was in .22lr. It wasn't so much a gun as device that was used to detonate ammunition. It did work, though. My guess on trigger pull was 30 lb.s. REALLY! It was incredibly hard to pull...and I used to lift weights back then. I was fascinated by it, though...I couldn't believe they could sell a gun so cheap. If they had vending machines for guns, the RG .22 would be the kind of weapon they would sell in it. It was like more than 30 but less than 40 bucks.

They also had RG .38 Specials for like $78. The "flagship" of the line :). These were only available at Pawn shops...or I should say "exclusive" to pawn shops. :)

I really regret not getting one of the .38's...OR starting my own Saturday Night Special collection. That would've been cool.

Tony_the_tiger
October 20, 2013, 12:37 PM
I really wanted to like this S&W 640 Pro.

http://i978.photobucket.com/albums/ae269/kiwirat33/p2.jpg

But it was the only revolver I have ever shot that had failure to fire events out of the box. I sent it to S&W and they replaced the firing pin.

When I got it back, I took it to the range one time. After one range session the cylinder started binding and the cylinder release would not function correctly. I sent it back again and it came back with notes that the frame was warped and the hand re-fitted.

I put it in a drawer. When I opened the drawer a couple of weeks later, the star had rust all over it.

I cleaned it up real nice and function tested it to make sure nothing else was wrong with it. I lubed up the star.

Then I traded it for a Remington 870 and some ammo. the 640 had been cleared at the factory and was accurate so other than the rust, it should serve someone well provided no other issues arise. I was in the market for a HD shotgun anyway.

http://i978.photobucket.com/albums/ae269/kiwirat33/870_zps7ff22a47.jpg

First time out with the 870, the plastic stock cracked in half. I took it on the chin and replaced the plastic stock and fore-end with walnut from the 870-P model. Then I added a limbsaver recoil pad and fitted it with a Four-Sevens Maelstrom MMX. Nothing wrong with the action. Looks better with wood anyway ;)

The 640 was supposed to be a double j-frame carry piece to go with my S&W 442. This SP101 now fills that role:

http://i978.photobucket.com/albums/ae269/kiwirat33/Chrono/SPhold920_zpsbeb611aa.jpg

I still like the 640 Pro conceptually. It was beautiful. But, I hold my revolvers to a high standard and it had to go.

KenW.
October 20, 2013, 09:34 PM
Rohm .44 Magnum. It never let me down. Took a buck muley with it. Always operated flawlessly. But it was still the junkiest revolver I have ever owned. Been fortunate I recon.

OrangePwrx9
October 20, 2013, 09:40 PM
6" Ruger GP-100. Trigger I never got used to; not too accurate; felt like a brick compared with my Security Six. It was reliable, though.

4" Smith 586. Very inaccurate. Took a few trips back to the factory and some money, but they finally got it so it shoots. Unfortunately, I aged nearly 20 years in the process and now I'm not very accurate. Oh, well, at least one of us can shoot.

tinygnat219
October 20, 2013, 10:03 PM
Now it's been a few years since I've talked about specifics with these revolvers, so the details are a tad fuzzy.
Taurus 905 9MM Revolver. Shavings in the action caused binding. Cracked open the sideplate and blew out with compressed air / picked out with tweezers, sent back to factory. Came back, worked ok... Sold it.
Taurus 94. 22LR Revolver. Shavings in the action caused binding. Did the same thing as above. sent it back to the factory. Came back, had misfires. Sent it back to the factory. Sold it, didn't even bother test firing it.
Taurus Gaucho Revolvers. One had an annoying trigger slap, and both would misfire. Sent them back to the factory, was told that there was nothing wrong. Tried them again. Same issue. sold them
These were bought brand new and sold with full disclaimers including copies of the letters I got back. The buyers got and extreme discout.

Stuff I've had issues with in a trade:
S&W 686 (don't remember the "dash". Crane was bent from firing hot handloads through it. Sent it back to Smith & Wesson. They sent a tag, I sent the gun. It was back 2 weeks later with a bill for $60 for parts and labor. I happily paid that (this gun was purchased used). Was a nice revolver.

lowercase
October 21, 2013, 12:50 AM
Charter Arms Mag Pug, recent manufacture (3 years old). Shot so low I had to machine down the front sight to hit paper. Appears to be common to them. Also, the frame screws constantly loosen. And there are chatter marks in the rifling (!). A POS.

I also have a Mag Pug.

Same deal with the front sight. I filed that thing down a LONG way to get it on the paper.

Also, it spits debris at my face from the ports. Especially with .357 ammo.

Third, the darn thing groups like a shotgun with .38spl. It is a bit (and only a little bit) better with .357, but not by much. Oh, yeah, the screws loosen up, too.

Other than that, it's not too bad. LOL.

What's weird, is that I have a .44 Bulldog built on the same frame that I absolutely love. My Bulldog is the cat's meow. Go figure with the Mag Pug. I tried to like that thing, but finally gave up on it. I like Charters, and own 6 others. This particular one though, is just not good at all. At least it always goes bang when i pull the trigger.

Driftwood Johnson
October 21, 2013, 10:05 AM
Howdy

I have so many Smiths that I have lost count. The oldest one was made in 1863, the newest one in the 1980s. Not a bad one in the bunch. I have Colts, Rugers, Ubertis and a few oddballs too.

The only truly bad revolver I ever owned was an Uberti cattleman that I bought used. The front sight was bent and the trigger pull was the worst I have ever felt in any revolver. Rough as a cob. I traded it in on a Ruger. Too bad, if I knew then what I know now, I probably could have fixed it, but I didn't, so I didn't.

The other Uberis I own are fine.

OARNGESI
October 21, 2013, 10:14 AM
rg rohm 38

Fiv3r
October 21, 2013, 10:33 AM
I've got a pot-metal Plinkerton .22 that is the same size and heft as a .45 SAA. It's not terrible, but it's goofy for what it is. A six shot SA with no transfer bar which makes it a 5 shooter if you plan to carry it that weighs more than a Ruger MKIII loaded with a 10 round magazine. It's a little picky about ammo, but it takes you a LONG time to go through a bunch of it. It also has this weird lock on the side of it which would make it safe to carry 6 shots in the gun, but it requires a double prong key and sticks out a good bit.

I use it as a beater/loaner when my buddies go to the range with me. I generally ask that they help with the ammo cost as I'm supplying thousands of dollars worth of guns to shoot. If they don't pony up the cash, I give them a 50 round box of .22 and hand them the Plinkerton. They'll usually chip in for some .38 or a couple of boxes of .223 the next trip out:evil:

Maybe my worst functioning revolver is an 1895 Nagant. As always, it has about a 22lb DA trigger on it, the cylinder spins freely so you have to make sure you keep track of your shots, and it leads up if you shoot .32 long out of it instead of the intended ammo...but I love her so:D It's such a cool piece of history that I don't mind.

Revolver Ocelot
October 21, 2013, 12:48 PM
I haven't personally owned a revolver that didn't live up to my expectations, however I had a bad experience with a chiappa rhino that a friend had bought. I ran into a friend at the range one day who had bought a gun that I had been considering picking up, at first I was jealous at first, but in retrospect I'm glad I didn't beat him to that gun. He had never fired it before, and on that first rage trip the hammer spring lever broke, seizing up the entire gun. I was luckily able to safely get it unloaded, but when my friend tried contacting chiappa by phone and email he was met by silence. He has had the gun for over a year now and still hasn't been able to get ahold of them at last I checked.

Gun Master
October 21, 2013, 06:29 PM
I've got a pot-metal Plinkerton .22 that is the same size and heft as a .45 SAA. It's not terrible, but it's goofy for what it is. A six shot SA with no transfer bar which makes it a 5 shooter if you plan to carry it that weighs more than a Ruger MKIII loaded with a 10 round magazine. It's a little picky about ammo, but it takes you a LONG time to go through a bunch of it. It also has this weird lock on the side of it which would make it safe to carry 6 shots in the gun, but it requires a double prong key and sticks out a good bit.

I use it as a beater/loaner when my buddies go to the range with me. I generally ask that they help with the ammo cost as I'm supplying thousands of dollars worth of guns to shoot. If they don't pony up the cash, I give them a 50 round box of .22 and hand them the Plinkerton. They'll usually chip in for some .38 or a couple of boxes of .223 the next trip out:evil:

Maybe my worst functioning revolver is an 1895 Nagant. As always, it has about a 22lb DA trigger on it, the cylinder spins freely so you have to make sure you keep track of your shots, and it leads up if you shoot .32 long out of it instead of the intended ammo...but I love her so:D It's such a cool piece of history that I don't mind.
I " HATE " the trigger pull on the Nagant 1895. What the hey ? Forgive and forget.....I always say.:)

PabloJ
October 21, 2013, 07:43 PM
http://i171.photobucket.com/albums/u307/Stainz_2007/002-3.jpg

I knew it was a POS when I bought it to 'share' .32 S&WL/H&RM duties with my treasured 632 Pro. I wasn't disappointed - it really is a POS! A HS shop class could make a 'finer' replica of a revolver. It's DA pull rivals that of the worst of my 1895 Nagants' DA pull. Actually, I am being kind! Two Benjamins won't get you much from a gunstore these days - other than their muted laughter as you leave with that turkey.

Stainz
Yes, a POS. Mine had plastic coupling between spring & trigger that snapped not long after I bought the gun. The smith had to make new replacement (he gets these with this fairure on regular basis so he makes about dozen at a time because there are no commercial spares). To add insult to injury POS was made of poorly blued tool steel that rusted like old square 18th century spike.

orionengnr
October 21, 2013, 07:52 PM
First revolver I ever bought was a Rossi M68 (69?) .38 Spl, back in the early 80s.
Each time a round fired, the recoil caused the cylinder to un-latch and open maybe 1/8". The result was that the trigger would not pull and the cylinder would not turn. A sharp slap from the left side would seat the cylinder, and it would function for exactly one ,ore round...at which point the cycle would repeat. I replaced the extractor (pin that was coming un-done), the spring (every one I could lay my hands on) and did everything that seemed to make sense.

I took it to a smith who dismissed me and told me that it would cost more to fix than it was worth. He may have been right, may have been wrong. But it turned me off of revolvers for the next 20+ years. When I tried again I bought a used S&W and have bought many more since. :D

As far as the Rossi? I took an 8-lb sledge hammer to it. Beat it as flat as I could, then threw it in a lake. Maybe not the most mature approach to the problem, but a very pure and satisfying one. :)

witchhunter
October 21, 2013, 09:59 PM
I saved up for a bit when I was a kid, wanted a single action like my uncles Colt. Found possibly the worst one in a Rohm .22. The thing would shoot more lead out the sides than in the front. The absolute worst. the front sight was attached to a band around the barrel that held on the ejector rod housing. It was always coming loose, didn't matter it was like throwing rocks at flying quail.

JERRY
October 21, 2013, 10:06 PM
1988 blued charter arms bulldog in .44spl, then a stainless version of the same a few months later.

Steve51
October 21, 2013, 10:10 PM
I have purchased 2 Taurus revolvers (Model 992 & Model 66), 2 Ruger revolvers (.32 H & R Mag Single Six & .357 Blackhawk), and 2 Heritage revolvers (both .22lr/.22mag). All are good except one. One Heritage .22lr/.22mag revolver is way off on accuracy.

splattergun
October 21, 2013, 10:30 PM
RG 37 .22 revolver I "inherited" from the X. It must be one of the good RGs :rolleyes::what:
It actually shoots ok and it always functions in battery, always, but it is guilty of about a 10% light strike, even on CCI ammo. 10% fail to fire makes it a good throw away piece.

el Godfather
October 22, 2013, 06:16 PM
Webly & Scott .32 SW Long

UpperAtmosphere
October 23, 2013, 11:58 PM
NAA Mini Revolver.

I wanted to love the thing so much. It's adorable. It weighs nothing. It can hide as a belt buckle or absolutely vanish into your pocket. It seemed like an outstanding backup idea.

Mine has trouble getting on paper at five yards. I tried various ways of holding it. I tried the holster grip. I figured it was me and not the gun, so I let a respectable shooter give it a whirl with no better success than what I had.

Seems that at range, I'd be better off keeping it unloaded and throwing the gun itself!

just for fun
October 24, 2013, 10:53 AM
Ruger redhawk Shoot for one hour, clean for 3! Rough barrel. Sold it. No more Ruger's in this household.

Jim NE
October 24, 2013, 11:11 AM
First revolver I ever bought was a Rossi M68 (69?) .38 Spl, back in the early 80s.
Each time a round fired, the recoil caused the cylinder to un-latch and open maybe 1/8". The result was that the trigger would not pull and the cylinder would not turn. A sharp slap from the left side would seat the cylinder, and it would function for exactly one ,ore round...at which point the cycle would repeat. I replaced the extractor (pin that was coming un-done), the spring (every one I could lay my hands on) and did everything that seemed to make sense.

I took it to a smith who dismissed me and told me that it would cost more to fix than it was worth. He may have been right, may have been wrong. But it turned me off of revolvers for the next 20+ years. When I tried again I bought a used S&W and have bought many more since. :D

As far as the Rossi? I took an 8-lb sledge hammer to it. Beat it as flat as I could, then threw it in a lake. Maybe not the most mature approach to the problem, but a very pure and satisfying one. :)
My Rossi 68 is great. They're actually fine guns generally speaking. The model 88 and 68 are essentially the same gun, and highly regarded by a good number of people. The problem is it says "Rossi" on the side. Had it said "S&W" and had the exact same problem, very few people people would've beat it with a sledge hammer.

Every model of gun has some bad ones get through production, but if it happens with a Smith, they say "Hmm, that's odd. I'll send it back to the factory."

If it happens to some off brand, they say "AHA!!! JUST AS I EXPECTED!!" And dismissive gunsmiths don't help.

I have a very nice pre-model 10 from the late 1940's develop a couple of problems recently. I sorted everything out and it works great...

...sure glad I didn't take a sledgehammer to it.

Old Dog
October 24, 2013, 03:32 PM
I cannot say that I've ever bought a bad revolver. The cheapest new revolver I ever picked up, a Taurus Model 85 CH in 1991, has been superb. The beater police trade-in Model 10s I've had over the years have all been great. But, the only revolvers I've ever used have been two Taurus and a multitude of S&Ws, so I either have good taste or am just plain lucky.

"Worst" revolver I ever had was my first S&W with The Lock -- a 637 that had the peculiar clear-coat peel off the aluminum frame, looked hideous ... traded it off shortly after.

madFive
October 24, 2013, 03:53 PM
I've only ever owned one revolver, and I love that gun. But since I've only owned one, I guess it is also the worst. :P

A S&W 681: .357-mag, 6-rd, 5" bl, low-profile fixed sights.

I got it for $300 in 2005, a police turn-in. It did actually have some minor timing issues when I first got it - was easy for LGS to fix. Been 100% ever since.

PistolPete45
October 24, 2013, 04:14 PM
I only had one problem A Taurus 44 Special.. but I have to say I might be the blame .. I kind of went off road in a muddy curve on a motorcycle .. came to about two hours later . Long story short when the Trooper gave me my gun back the timing was screwed . For those that have not figured it out .. either I landed on it somehow or the trooper screwed it up on porpoise when he had to give it back ...

orionengnr
October 24, 2013, 04:21 PM
The problem is it says "Rossi" on the side. Had it said "S&W" and had the exact same problem, very few people people would've beat it with a sledge hammer.
No, the problem was that it would cost more to fix it than it was worth.
If it was an S&W, I could have sent it back to the factory knowing that it would be fixed correctly, and very possibly free of charge.
And today it would be worth 4 or 5X what I paid for it in 1984.
The Rossi would be worth about the same today as it was back then.

PistolPete45
October 24, 2013, 04:43 PM
Forget the sights look down the side and use the cylinder to aim .. I hit a lot of things farther away then anyone thinks possible.. practice practice and you can hit with it .. no target gun for sure but a great comin out of nowhere surprise.

Deaf Smith
October 26, 2013, 11:02 PM
I guess worst for me was a Charter Arms Police Bulldog in .38 Spl. The aluminum shroud for the barrel would fly off. Crummy trigger, crummy sights, and weak lockup to boot. Other than that it was a good gun.

Deaf

GaryP
October 27, 2013, 01:19 AM
We'll for me it was a Wesson Arms 738P. I purchased it back in 1993 NIB and from day one I had issues with the Hand spring. This was a well built revolver that was a good shooter as long as I shot it in single action mode, but if I tried shooting it in DA mode rapidly the hand spring would flex resulting in the cylinder not turning. When I finally decided to get it fixed Wesson Arms had went out of business (1995) and parts were not available from Dan Wesson for this model. My point is there are poorly engineered revolvers out there but I still prefer a good revolver over an auto. This was the only revolver I ever had an issue with right out of the box. I did find a good Gunsmith who found a stronger spring to put in it and all was good, but I never trusted the 738P after that. The 738P was rated for +P and was built like a Tank - what were the engineers thinking in this situation. :banghead:

PO2Hammer
October 27, 2013, 02:40 AM
NAA Black Widow in .22 WMR.
Had a barrel/cylinder gap that you could slip a dime through.
The blast was ferocious.

Geezer Glide
October 27, 2013, 08:20 AM
I've owned some good Taurus handguns before so I'm not bashing Taurus. I will bash one particular Model 94 .22 that I had. After about 75 rounds, the timing was way off. It was so far off that the firing pin just hit the very edge of the rim on the cartridge and luckily it didn't fire.

Esoxchaser
October 27, 2013, 08:26 AM
Never had anything but S&W's, Colts and Rugers. All were excellent. I have seen a lot of crap in my day, but the only piece of crap I ever bought myself wasn't a wheel gun, it was a Kimber Solo.

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