Opinions on 'Field' shotguns being used for Home Defense?


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CoyoteSix
October 21, 2013, 03:07 PM
Hey all, I'm eyeballing Shotguns again.

I was just curious about what some of you wise gentleman thought of using a 'Field' style shotgun defensively.

I'm thinking of picking up a Benelli SuperNova in the field configuration. I'm leaning towards the Field style because I may be informally shooting clays with friends, or go waterfowling with family.

I'd also want to be able to use it for HD if I ever had to. Right now a Glock 27 pulls night stand duty.

Also, when I say Home Defense I just mean locking down a secure room while the Fiance calls the police. I wouldn't be looking for Mr. Badguy in my home. My intuition says it'll be fine for the job, but I like feedback.

EDIT: I did read through some of Mr. Dave McCracken "On Fighting Shotguns" thread. Good stuff.

Thoughts? Opinions? I'm always up for advice.

Thanks!

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ugaarguy
October 21, 2013, 03:28 PM
It'll work just fine. You can always add a spare "tactical" bbl later if you really want to. It's not like a 24"+ field is going to make it less effective at delivering lead to an intruder. If you're in a fixed position it isn't going to matter.

CoyoteSix
October 21, 2013, 03:42 PM
Thanks Ugaar. I hear that Benelli Bbl's are incredibly expensive. I may just by the SuperNova 'Tactical' (Hate that word) later if I feel the need.

MachIVshooter
October 21, 2013, 03:48 PM
Most good defensive shotguns are nothing more than a field grade hunting shotgun with an 18"-20" barrel. As such, most any field gun can be made a good defense gun with the addition of an 18"-20" barrel.

My HD scattergun began life as a 28" full choke bird gun when it was born some 85 years ago:

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n117/Hunter2506/RemingtonM11.jpg

Sheepdog1968
October 21, 2013, 03:53 PM
The Mossberg 500 at our local sporting goods box store Big 5 often has on a sale a 28" plus 18.5" dual barrel combo so you can swap out barrels for the exact reason. Often runs $300 out the door. One heck of a deal.

CoyoteSix
October 21, 2013, 03:53 PM
^^ That's just sexy MachIV. Very jealous. Honestly both the SuperNova Tactical and Field both appeal to me. Just a matter of what to buy first. Luckily most of my shotgun shooting is in the summer, so time I have.

desidog
October 21, 2013, 04:12 PM
http://m5.paperblog.com/i/44/442538/joe-biden-buy-a-shotgun-instead-of-an-ar-15-L-ma07UP.jpeg

Uniquedot
October 21, 2013, 04:26 PM
Most cases where shotguns were used in a HD situation the guns were field guns. The two accounts that I've personally seen shotguns used in HD one had a 30" barrel and the other had a 28" barrel. You just have to be willing to pull the trigger before you allow someone to get close enough to you to get their hands on the barrel, but even so with a short barrel as well.

PJSprog
October 21, 2013, 05:59 PM
The only reason for a shorter barrel on a HD shotgun is better maneuverability in tight places (corners, doorways, hallways). As stated above, if you're staying in a fixed position, barrel size is largely irrelevant.

Claymore1500
October 21, 2013, 06:32 PM
I just picked up an Ithaca mod.37, 16ga. it's going to be in the HD role primarily. Why a 16ga you ask, it is what came available, and my significant other can shoot it better than a 12ga.

CarolinaChuck
October 21, 2013, 06:33 PM
That's my call; why bring a riot gun to a little old home defense party? When Claymore mines and hand-grenades are a bit over-kill; I like a good dose of 00 shot to, "prime the old carburetor" so to speak. Anything that'll blow a man near clean in half gets my vote...

I remember as a kid the crazy neighbor coming over to the house with a rifle carrying some complaint with him. Pop came out of the house with a 12 gauge shot gun; the conversation took a turn for the worse for the neighbor. I always figured that the crazy neighbor wasn't all that good of a shot, or his firearm wasn't loaded either... The fact of the matter is, in conversation range a 12 gauge is a formidable weapon.

CC

bubba in ca
October 21, 2013, 10:02 PM
If it fits, goes bang when you pull the trigger, and is paid for, it will do just fine. I suspect than only a tiny percentage of the homes that have shotguns for defense have tacti-cool models. The burglar or rapist won`t care in the slightest.

I have one shotgun with a 24 or so inch barrel that I detest, but push comes to shove it will work fine, just a few training issues to practice on. (the model has very expensive replacement barrels and I haven`t psyched myself up to cutting it down). The shotgun on the other side of the house has an 18.5 vent rib which is great.
Vent rib for HD? No $100-200 add on wonder sight? Try a vent rib and see how much sight you need for minute of burglar at 10 feet.

herrwalther
October 21, 2013, 10:52 PM
Baddie won't care if your shotgun isn't tactical. 12ga is pretty much a universal language regardless of the furniture.

303tom
October 22, 2013, 12:06 AM
I`m not beyond picking any shotgun around the house & blasting a home invader, no matter what grade it is !............

BigBore44
October 22, 2013, 12:22 AM
Just bought a new SuperNova a few weeks ago. It's nice to have the 3.5" option if you ever wanted it. That shotgun will do what you need it to. As for the barrel, yes they are expensive. However, Midway offers aftermarket barrels for the for less than $200. Could always have one of those cut down and you'd be GTG.

boogieman
October 22, 2013, 07:19 AM
I know that my 30" BPS will go bang every time I pull the trigger regardless of load and or conditions. I have also put thousands of rounds through it to proove my point. I certainly wouldnt trust any tacticool model over my tried and true friend.
Also as a side note: I load the first one with #7 and follow with buck. I have kids in the house and the IMO the likeliness of making a bad first shot and injuring one of my family (stray shot through a wall scenario) is limited by lack of penetration through plaster.

rodinal220
October 22, 2013, 12:34 PM
Field type guns are GTG for HD scenarios,lots of folks using them. Benelli barrels are gold plated and for what you pay for them you could buy 2-3 used pump guns depending on your locale. Even for the price of an aftermarket barrel I would personally buy another good used pump shotgun and have two guns.
I have a Benelli Nova with the ghost ring sights and it shoots tight groups(head shot) with cheap Foster type slugs at 50 yards. The Nova series are good guns.

USAF_Vet
October 22, 2013, 02:23 PM
My current HD shotgun is a 13 gauge Mav 88 with 18.5" barrel, but will eventually be overshadowed by a Remington pre-model 11 autoloading shotgun.
I really like the recoil operated self loaders, and this one operated smoothly with everything from low brass target loads to high brass slugs, without adjusting the recoiled system. Once I get the tie to do so, I'll dial in the recoil system properly for whichever load I plan to primarily load.

I have my folks set up for HD with a Remington 1100 20 gauge. Its a field gun. For a barricaded bedroom scenario, it'll work just fine. Just gotta make sure one of them remembers to pull the duck plug. :rolleyes:

MachIVshooter
October 22, 2013, 08:49 PM
My current HD shotgun is a 13 gauge Mav 88 with 18.5" barrel

Now that's a special gun. Gotta be tough finding ammo, though...

Nickel Plated
October 22, 2013, 09:59 PM
^^ That's just sexy MachIV. Very jealous. Honestly both the SuperNova Tactical and Field both appeal to me. Just a matter of what to buy first. Luckily most of my shotgun shooting is in the summer, so time I have.

Definately get the Field model first if you can only afford one barrel. You're not gonna be shooting burglars on a weekly basis. You will be shooting lots of clays though. It's too much fun.
Since your HD needs are pretty well covered with the Glock and a field shotgun, the dedicated HD barrel can wait until you get around to it.

CoyoteSix
October 23, 2013, 02:30 PM
I think that's what I'll likely end up doing. However after stopping by my LGS, the 870 Express is calling my name again. :D

Something about that smooth action, matte finish, and wood.

tnxdshooter
October 23, 2013, 03:49 PM
Mine began life as a 28" vent ribbed ported barrel blued with wood furniture and bead sight and I turned it into this.

http://i1338.photobucket.com/albums/o685/dsclaiborne35/2013-10-10162053_zps49410792.jpg

mpia
October 23, 2013, 05:52 PM
If it comes to pass that you are in such a situation, you need to have the weapon handy,at arms reach and be ready and willing to shoot.Otherwise no matter what you have - your toast.
1 Pick a weapon.
2 figure out where you are going to store / hide it
3 now be somewhere else in the home and see how quick you can access it
... repeat 2 & 3 until you can feel comfortable [ big home? maybe 2 weapons?]
4 Is it loaded?
5 is one in the chamber? extra rounds handy?
6 can you move through the home /exterior comfortably quietly - remember you ain't quail hunting.

Now Think ---:confused:
- can you pull the trigger on a 16 year old in self-defense?:confused:
- how do you disarm, contain the situation?:o
- how do you contact law enforcement?:confused:

Personally, I think most of these conversations are BS; use whatever you have, however you can, to disable, disarm and immobilize. Then let the lawyers and legal system sort it out. Better to be judged by 12, than be carried by six.

USAF_Vet
October 23, 2013, 07:25 PM
That's why I reload. Also, my amp goes to 11.

LeonCarr
October 23, 2013, 07:33 PM
Take a look at the various Turkey model shotguns on the market. They have all the features of a good HD shotgun, plus a slightly longer barrel (20-23 inches usually) that you can use for hunting or clays, and it can still be maneuvered around the house.

Just my .02,
LeonCarr

Geno
October 23, 2013, 07:46 PM
My grandfather's HD shotgun, was a 30" side-by-side 16 guage. Can't say that I ever would want to face such a firearm!

Geno

ZVP
October 24, 2013, 03:46 AM
Fot the Bad guy just looking down the bore of any Shotgun, thoughts of why did I mess withthese folks quicklly cross their small minds!
Nothing gets the attention that a Shotgun demands!
Sure there are limitations of manuverability and magazine capacity but the idea of the shotguns potential is oftrn enough.
If you have just one gun, then think over your options and how to apply them in various situations.
No warning shots.
Yes your hunting gun may be used!
BPDave

BigBore44
October 24, 2013, 06:10 AM
mpia,
I agree with everything except the "Could you shoot a 16 year old in self defense" question. Age is/should be a non factor in SD/HD situations. Otherwise, spot on. Training and competence with a firearm and a scenario are more critical when the time comes than "what's the best gun for....?". The "best" is easily answered by: "What gun do you own, that's capable of handling the "scenario", that you are most competent with?".

That being said, if the OP is not activly seeking out the intruder and is merely protecting/covering one area from a fixed position, just about any shotgun up to and including a punt gun would work.

CoyoteSix
October 24, 2013, 06:29 PM
now be somewhere else in the home and see how quick you can access it

I house carry my Glock 27 almost all the time, That along with an amazing Streamlight Polytac handlight. :cool:

I'd feel much more comfortable with a long gun than my Glock though in a HD situation.


Also, aren't many Turkey guns rifled? If my Newbie mind is correct wouldn't standard shot pattern horribly out of a rifled Bbl?

Uniquedot
October 24, 2013, 06:49 PM
Also, aren't many Turkey guns rifled?

No they're not rifled, but there are special straight rifled turkey tubes available that help to slow down the wad, but they don't transfer spin.

wouldn't standard shot pattern horribly out of a rifled Bbl?

Yes it wreaks havoc on patterns with shot of any size.

CoyoteSix
October 24, 2013, 09:54 PM
Thanks for that info ^^

Anyone know if the Mossberg "Turkey Thug" line is worth saving up for?

LeonCarr
October 25, 2013, 10:51 AM
The Turkey Thug would be an excellent choice for home defense.

Just my .02,
LeonCarr

toivo
October 25, 2013, 11:27 AM
+1 on a pump with an extra barrel. I found that it was cheaper to buy a "field" model of the gun and then add a "defense" barrel than to buy it the other way around. Also, many of the defense models have an extended mag tube and can't take the field barrels. Something to consider.

mgkdrgn
October 26, 2013, 10:13 AM
Take a look at the various Turkey model shotguns on the market. They have all the features of a good HD shotgun, plus a slightly longer barrel (20-23 inches usually) that you can use for hunting or clays, and it can still be maneuvered around the house.

Just my .02,
LeonCarr
yep

the diff between one of those and a "tacticool" shotgun won't make a wit of difference to the BG on the wrong end of it at 2:45 am.

CoyoteSix
October 26, 2013, 02:39 PM
Does anyone know if my rifle rated Evil Roy targets will react well to cheap target loads?

mr.trooper
October 26, 2013, 06:59 PM
Got a Benelli Nova 24" that pulls double duty just fine.

PabloJ
October 27, 2013, 06:05 AM
Very suitable for HD. Not long ago local shop had Pa. A.H. Fox A grade two barrel set. Second set of barrels which was numbered to the firearm was 24" and made at Savage Arms. That gun with low velocity BK in 24" configuration would make an excellent HD gun sort of like Coach or Howdah kind of concept.

Ash
October 27, 2013, 06:35 AM
Everything about a field shotgun, except perhaps barrel length, seems absolutely perfect for home use. They are clean. There are no protrusions to snag or grab anything. They are slim and smooth enough that you can grasp and get into position quickly, which is useful either for ducks/geese/dove/rabbit etc that suddenly show up or for a baddie who does the same.

They also carry the bonus of looking "normal" should you have to go after a baddie. It would be best for the responding officers to not see a Tom Clancy Rainbow Six wannabee standing over the bloody corpse of the baddie. They can get the wrong impression. Of course, standing in such fashion is preferable to being the body they discover the next day on an investigation of an open door, but when they show up and the field grade shotgun is standing beside the door, action open, unloaded, it sure looks like an innocent homeowner startled into deadly force by a ne'er-do-well looking to visit harm upon him and his family. An honest rabbit or pheasant hunter who has to perform the dreadful act of home-protection.

For me, my firearms need to be simple and functional without excess bobbles or protrusions. Legions disagree and that is fine, but my family has used firearms in defense many times (my grandfather twice, my mother once, my great grandfather once, the latter involving a justified killing). Coincidentally they all involved revolvers, only one involved firing a shot, none required folding or collapsing stocks, lasers, led lights, heat shields, or the like. My grandfather kept a Remington Model 11 behind the door for animal defense (mostly rabid raccoons but also against armadillos). It was virtually the same as the Savage 720 MachIVshooter has on the first page. That is good enough for me.

boogieman
October 27, 2013, 09:19 PM
In all the SD shootings I have read about I dont ever recall pattern being an issue. If you can get the gun in your hands and pull the trigger on the BG before he does the same to you I am pretty sure you will live for another day. Be familiar with the gun and where it is when you need it. Confirm the target and pull the trigger. No regrets or remorse for anyone uninvited

ugaarguy
October 27, 2013, 09:57 PM
none required folding or collapsing stocks, lasers, led lights, heat shields, or the like.
We used to drive cars that got 8 mpg and used leaded gasoline. They still got us from point a to point b.

Knowing one's target and what's beyond it is a fundamental rule of firearms safety. White LED lights have become cheap, reliable, and readily available over the last decade. Why handicap yourself by not having such a light on your defensive firearm for target ID?

I was also created with short little T-Rex like arms. Collapsible stocks let me adjust firearms to fit me quickly and easily without permanently altering the gun.

I have tan furniture on one of my rifles as well. Many of my friends think it looks cool. I chose tan over other colors because the lighter color is cool - it's cool to the touch in heat of a Georgia summer.

I really don't understand the resistance so many folks have to practical advances in technology. I understand the sentiment against accessories that added for the sake of making something look tactical or cool. Practical accessories are another matter entirely.

Deltaboy
October 27, 2013, 10:02 PM
Field shotguns were first one used in defence of the homestead. They still get the job done.

Ash
October 28, 2013, 06:54 AM
ugaarguy, would it not be better to have a stock permanently fit to you? It isn't a good idea to stop and try to adjust a shotgun's stock to fit you while a baddie is in the house. Indeed, when you're worried or nervous, that is the worst time to adjust anything. So, you keep it set before hand so you know it will work when desired. Why bother with adjustable at all, then? It would be better to just fit a stock to yourself. After all, who wears adjustable eye glasses? Nobody. They get them fit to themselves.

The car example is very weak. My 1945 Savage 720 is just as effective as any current "tactical shotgun." The power is the same, the shot shells are the same, and the efficiency of fire is the same. Ditto for a modern turkey gun. Your example would better fit were I defending the idea of using black powder Damascus-barreled shotguns or perhaps using Greener-Martini shotguns in 14 ga. I'm not.

The "combat" features generally added to a "defensive" shotgun are akin to spoilers, ground effects, spinning rims, and the like on Japanese compact cars. I'm saying a Toyota Corolla FX-16 was just as effective without those bobbles as it would be with them. I know, I was in a Mustang 5.0 that got beat by one without stuff tacked on. All the other things that make a car "Fast and Furious" are generally a waste of money.

Keep it simple. A field shotgun, particularly with a shorter barrel, doesn't need to be adjusted. If it is yours, it doesn't need an adjustable stock. It doesn't need a heat shield. It doesn't need a pistol-grip only stock (which is really a bad idea in defensive situations). It doesn't need a ghost ring. It doesn't need a bayonet lug. The only point you have in your argument is having a light. The other "features" are, of course this is an opinion and others, you included, disagree, at best needless and at worst things that render the firearm less effective.

ugaarguy
October 28, 2013, 02:00 PM
Ash, I made the first reply to this thread. That reply was:
It'll work just fine. You can always add a spare "tactical" bbl later if you really want to. It's not like a 24"+ field is going to make it less effective at delivering lead to an intruder. If you're in a fixed position it isn't going to matter.


As for your other points:
ugaarguy, would it not be better to have a stock permanently fit to you? It isn't a good idea to stop and try to adjust a shotgun's stock to fit you while a baddie is in the house. Indeed, when you're worried or nervous, that is the worst time to adjust anything. So, you keep it set before hand so you know it will work when desired. Why bother with adjustable at all, then? It would be better to just fit a stock to yourself.
I've been down that route, and it killed the resale value when I had to sell some guns when money got tight while I went through the VA disability claims process. There are other advantages to adjustable stocks, but that's a discussion for another thread. I'm well aware of the deterioration of fine motor skills under stress, when suddenly awakened, when sleep deprived, etc. Been there, done that, got the t-shirt. I agree that simple is good, and pre-adjusting a stock is pretty simple.
It doesn't need a heat shield. It doesn't need a pistol-grip only stock (which is really a bad idea in defensive situations). It doesn't need a ghost ring. It doesn't need a bayonet lug. The only point you have in your argument is having a light. The other "features" are, of course this is an opinion and others, you included, disagree, at best needless and at worst things that render the firearm less effective.
My last two sentences of my last post were: "I understand the sentiment against accessories that added for the sake of making something look tactical or cool. Practical accessories are another matter entirely."

We're in full agreement about PGO shotguns - they do nothing other than hurt your wrist and significantly hinder using a shotgun. I never said anything about "the shoulder thing that goes up" (heat shields) :D , nor bayonet lugs. Heat shields have that their place, but only in limited applications. A heat shield would only add weight and look silly on a field shotgun. No argument from me on that.

Bayonet lugs? Well I'll play devil's advocate here. I guess if you had a Mossberg 590A1 (or whichever model it is that has the bayo lug - are there any other shotguns currently made with a bayo lug?) you could put one of those bayonet lug to Picatinny rail adapters on it to hold your white light. That's also about all a bayonet lug is good for on a rifle now too - mounting accessories other than bayonets. So, no, I'm not running out to find a bayonet lug I can silver solder onto the bbl of the Winchester 37A single shot that was passed down to me. :evil:

Rifle sights are slightly different matter. I'd never put them on a field gun used for birds or clays, but they're right at home on a field gun used for pigs or deer. If I lived or hunted in a state or zone that was shotgun only for big game I'd have an 870 with the fixed mod choke, rifle sighted bbl. Or maybe a rifle sighted, rifled bore, slug bbl. I wouldn't use a shotgun with a rifled slug bbl for HD. However, a fixed mod choke bbl that patterns even cheap buckshot nicely would be a great on a HD shotgun. The factory rifle sights, whether open notch or aperture rear, wouldn't make it any less effective. I wouldn't add rifle sights unless I had a practical field use for them either though.

Overall, I think we're on the same page, and we just had to more thoroughly discuss our similar views on practical vs. tacticool. :)

12Pump
October 28, 2013, 03:57 PM
the diff between one of those and a "tacticool" shotgun won't make a wit of difference to the BG on the wrong end of it at 2:45 am.

Remember, there are 2 ends of a shotgun. The "send", and the "receive". The person on the receiving end won't be able to tell the difference, but the sender (shooter) might be able to handle the gun more effectively with one gun versus another, thus dictating whether the shot ends up being a hit or a miss--which would actually mean a great deal to the "receiver".

IOW, what matters is how proficient you are with it.

Uniquedot
October 28, 2013, 06:21 PM
I really don't understand the resistance so many folks have to practical advances in technology.

I read an article written by a couple of guys that taught shotgun SD/HD classes (I think it was in guns magazine a few years back) and they said most people showed up to the course with lights, side saddles, slings etc. hanging from their shotguns, but by the time the course was over most of them were always stripped down to a bare shotgun leaving the hollywood stuff at home. Myself I've always considered the advancement in technology of flashligts shining from the end of my shotgun to be a giveaway of position...at least outside the premises. I simply take a flashlight out with me just in case and I don't have to worry about junk hanging from my weapon. I'd be willing to bet that the hardcore bird hunter is better trained with a shotgun than most of the guys teaching HD/SD shotgun classes.

plumberroy
October 28, 2013, 07:19 PM
I read an article written by a couple of guys that taught shotgun SD/HD classes (I think it was in guns magazine a few years back) and they said most people showed up to the course with lights, side saddles, slings etc. hanging from their shotguns, but by the time the course was over most of them were always stripped down to a bare shotgun leaving the hollywood stuff at home. Myself I've always considered the advancement in technology of flashligts shining from the end of my shotgun to be a giveaway of position...at least outside the premises. I simply take a flashlight out with me just in case and I don't have to worry about junk hanging from my weapon. I'd be willing to bet that the hardcore bird hunter is better trained with a shotgun than most of the guys teaching HD/SD shotgun classes.
Exactly on the light, Your in my house uninvited which I can walk through in total darkness (I practice) and a tactical light comes on I will put it out. with buckshot long gun or pistol that won't end well for whoever turned the light on . Bad guy will also have to deal with the dogs not mean but noisy . and they have different bark for my kids the only ones with keys and a stranger My kids also know if they come in unexpectedly to call out as soon as they enter .
Roy

ugaarguy
October 28, 2013, 07:35 PM
Myself I've always considered the advancement in technology of flashligts shining from the end of my shotgun to be a giveaway of position...at least outside the premises. I simply take a flashlight out with me just in case and I don't have to worry about junk hanging from my weapon.
That's why you need to understand how to use the momentary on function, move, etc. That's where training comes in. Knowing when not to turn on a tac light is just as important as knowing when to turn it on.
I'd be willing to bet that the hardcore bird hunter is better trained with a shotgun than most of the guys teaching HD/SD shotgun classes.
You'd lose that bet, but there's far more crossover between the two than you realize. To your point though, one should always carefully evaluate the trainer's credentials before committing the time and money to attend a course. Don't trust just anyone who's offering courses.

Uniquedot
October 28, 2013, 08:16 PM
You'd lose that bet

How do you know I'd lose? I mean after all everything in the training is for imagined scenarios. Being a hunter myself I know that when the shotgun touches my shoulder the shot is away and the beast or fowl is dead. All the while manipulation has occurred with every required control on the shotgun and it's back on safe without ever realizing it. Speed is the key and the hunter doesn't teach or practice imagined scenarios as he deals only in reality and his guns are used much more often than people who take SD HD classes. The hunter that also plays on the clays field gets more trigger time and gun training than any other. You never know how someone is going to react in a real situation when their life is threatened, but the hunter and clay target shooter has reaction time down to the T.


That's why you need to understand how to use the momentary on function, move, etc. That's where training comes in.

I'm pretty sure that if I can manage to peel gray darts outta the sky runnin' 60 mile an hour in the wind without thought I can tag the fellow thinking he can flash a light and then move fast enough to get away...I think he'd need more on his side than training for an imagined scenario. :D Who knows for sure though.

Fred Fuller
October 28, 2013, 09:20 PM
I mean after all everything in the training is for imagined scenarios.

Interesting. Have you ever taken one of the classes? If so, who was the instructor?

Being a hunter myself I know that when the shotgun touches my shoulder the shot is away and the beast or fowl is dead.

And you never miss? :D

All joshing aside, I definitely agree that hunting - especially quail or rabbit - is good prep for using a shotgun for defense. BUT there are things even the best hunter will learn from a good professional defensive shotgun trainer. I know - I've been there on both fronts, in the field and in the classroom.

Uniquedot
October 28, 2013, 09:34 PM
Interesting. Have you ever taken one of the classes?

No, not physically I've just watched a couple dvds and read a few book articles on the subject. From what I've seen I haven't been impressed enough to think it would do me any good.


And you never miss?

I have bought some ammo that the factory left out the shot before...and sometimes my reloading press fails to drop the shot. :D

BUT there are things even the best hunter will learn from a good professional trainer. I know - I've been there on both fronts.

I understand there is knowledge in every aspect of training and the more training someone has the better off they'll be if or when the need arises, but there are a lot of people out there that have only took a few SD classes and then stick their gun in a corner where it sits collecting dust and I doubt they would have much a chance... say against a burglarizing hunter gone mad. :D

200Apples
October 28, 2013, 11:10 PM
.
So, yeah. Field shotguns for defense.

Run whatcha brung!

Wingmaster w/ 18'5 cyl bore barrel is my hd gun

Warming up an 1100 LT-20 SPECIAL for the lil' lady. Pick up the gun on Friday!

12Pump
October 29, 2013, 12:54 AM
So, yeah. Field shotguns for defense.

Run whatcha brung!

Wingmaster w/ 18'5 cyl bore barrel is my hd gun

Yes, back on subject!
I too see a field shotgun being just fine for HD if you're in a stationary position. The shorter barrel of a normal HD gun is for better maneuvering. But if you won't be moving around, then it doesn't matter. But if you do need to get up and move, use your handgun for that and leave the shotgun in your stationary position. Might be a good idea no matter how short your shotgun barrel is anyway. Handguns are quite superior in maneuverability, at the expense of power and ease of hitting. A shorter shotgun would be a good compromise between the field gun and handgun.

You just have to take all this into consideration and decide what your needs are.

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