Please help with rifle scope "click" math


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Rule3
October 21, 2013, 04:51 PM
:) Did not study this in school.

I have a Burris Scout 2.75 Scope on a Ruger GS Scout rifle (308)

If one click is 1/2 inch at 100 yards,

What is 1 click at 50 yards and at 25 yards??

I sighted it in at 50 yards but had a real hard time doing so. Shot a lot of ammo. Never had that much problem with a scope, Seems to be real sensitive, just a click or two makes a big difference. If I knew what I was doing it might help:D

With this small scope anything over 100 is not in my ability to see.

Thanks!

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rcmodel
October 21, 2013, 04:57 PM
50 = 1/4"
25 = 1/8"

You need to take a ruler with you next time, measure the group from the center of the aiming point, and do the math in 'clicks' at the range you are shooting!

Say it's off 2" right and 1" high at 25 yards.

16 clicks left and 8 clicks down should put you zeroed.

At 50 yards it would be 8 L & 4 D.

rc

Outlaw Man
October 21, 2013, 05:33 PM
RC is dead on.

And they probably did teach it in school. They just dumbed it down with pure math or gave you "real" word problems you'd never use, rather than something useful.

We'd have all paid more attention if high school geometry was swapped out for long range shooting. And they wouldn't have to teach anything different...

Rule3
October 21, 2013, 07:22 PM
Thanks!. Probably should bring a calculator also;)

forestswin
October 21, 2013, 07:35 PM
I think there's an app for that:D

abijohn
October 21, 2013, 09:12 PM
"Seems to be real sensitive, just a click or two makes a big difference."

Maybe the turrets are not 1/2 inch @ 100???? Leupold makes different turrrets with very different rates of movement. (M1 vs M5)

taliv
October 21, 2013, 09:14 PM
in my experience, with precision rifle scopes (good ones, at least), if it says 1/4 MOA clicks, they're pretty dang close to 1/4 MOA. but with cheaper ones that don't have target turrets that you mostly use pocket change or screw drivers to adjust, what's written on the label never matches what the bullets do on paper, and that goes for high dollar ones too (acogs/aimpoints etc). i've gotten to where i completely ignore what they claim the adjustments are.

so don't get in a sweat over it. as they say, "believe the bullet"

rcmodel
October 21, 2013, 09:19 PM
A ruler, pencil, & paper target would work better then a calculator I betcha!!

All you need to know is, 100 yards (1/2" clicks) cut in half at 50 yards is (1/4" clicks).

100 yards cut in 1/4's is 25 yards, and then they are (1/8" clicks).

The closer you are, the more marked clicks it takes to move the point of impact the same amount on target.

But you need a ruler to measure, and then do the 1/2 or 1/4 cyphering in your head to multiply how many 1/2" clicks it takes x2 at 50, or x4 at 25 yards.

Even a caveman can do it in their head when chucking rocks!!

rc

herrwalther
October 21, 2013, 11:11 PM
You can save yourself quite a bit of trouble by purchasing targets that are gridded with 1" grids. That way you can save time on measuring how many squares to adjust and just count them instead. I ordered a grid target from Cabelas that have large and bright orange vertical and horizontal line to the center, just like most scopes.

Rule3
October 21, 2013, 11:34 PM
You can save yourself quite a bit of trouble by purchasing targets that are gridded with 1" grids. That way you can save time on measuring how many squares to adjust and just count them instead. I ordered a grid target from Cabelas that have large and bright orange vertical and horizontal line to the center, just like most scopes.

Yes, I have those. They do make it easy. I print the free ones, (not counting the cost of printer paper and ink jet ink)

http://www.mytargets.com/

jmr40
October 22, 2013, 07:22 AM
The above info is correct, but don't waste time or ammo trying to get a perfect zero at 25 or 50 yards. Make shots at those ranges and rough zero enough to ensure you'll hit paper at 100 yards. Fine tune for an exact zero at at least 100 yards, then come back and note where you are impacting at closer ranges. Do the same at longer ranges even if you don't think you'll be shooting that far.

Shooting at 50 yards is too close. Minor errors won't show up until you get farther away and you'll just have to spend more time and ammo doing it all over again each time you increase the range.

Rule3
October 22, 2013, 10:46 AM
The above info is correct, but don't waste time or ammo trying to get a perfect zero at 25 or 50 yards. Make shots at those ranges and rough zero enough to ensure you'll hit paper at 100 yards. Fine tune for an exact zero at at least 100 yards, then come back and note where you are impacting at closer ranges. Do the same at longer ranges even if you don't think you'll be shooting that far.

Shooting at 50 yards is too close. Minor errors won't show up until you get farther away and you'll just have to spend more time and ammo doing it all over again each time you increase the range.

Excellent point. I will have to go over to the 100 yd range and do that. I reload but I still have "wasted" a lot of expensive Sierra and Nosler bullets. Oh well, I was shooting:)

So now that I am on paper at 50 yards, with the same bullet and load will I be high or low at 100 yards??
Need to know were to look for the bullet:banghead:

taliv
October 22, 2013, 11:15 AM
for most rifle/scope combinations, unless you mount your scope several inches above the bore, they shoot pretty flat. meaning, if you zeroed at say, 100, and then shot from 30 yards and then 200 yards, without making any adjustments, the bullets would probably not be more than 1.5 inches from the point you were aiming at. this wouldn't really change if you zeroed at 30 or zeroed at 200.

that said, if you zeroed at 50 yards, you will probably be just a bit high (an inch or probably less) at 100 and a bit low at 200. the point is you will definitely be on paper.

Rule3
October 22, 2013, 12:19 PM
for most rifle/scope combinations, unless you mount your scope several inches above the bore, they shoot pretty flat. meaning, if you zeroed at say, 100, and then shot from 30 yards and then 200 yards, without making any adjustments, the bullets would probably not be more than 1.5 inches from the point you were aiming at. this wouldn't really change if you zeroed at 30 or zeroed at 200.

that said, if you zeroed at 50 yards, you will probably be just a bit high (an inch or probably less) at 100 and a bit low at 200. the point is you will definitely be on paper.

OK, Thanks!. I am more of a handgunner.

I had the rifle boresighted (as all my others) and they were almost dead on, but for some reason this one was so far off I had no idea if I was high low or left or right. (if was way high and left off the 2' x 2 cardboardbord It was a frustrating experience. Plus it is still hot as hell and I was getting bent out of shape!.

ArchAngelCD
October 22, 2013, 05:06 PM
Is there a chart for going the other way?
If the scope does .5" @100 yards what does each click do @200 yards, 300 yards and 400 yards?

I would do a google search but I don't know how to correctly phrase the question to get what I'm looking for. The searches I've done so far were useless. :o

Outlaw Man
October 22, 2013, 05:51 PM
It works the same way. You'd double it, quadruple it, etc. (or cut it in half, 1/4....) If you're really interested, look up "similar triangles" and the math associated with them.

If you're looking for a chart that's gun related, look up ballistics tables. It's exactly the same, only it takes wind and gravity (and a few others; I'm simplifying, really) into account.

forestswin
October 22, 2013, 07:16 PM
Rule
if you got off the original bore sighting

the Ruger Scout is a bolt, isn't it?
can't you put it on a rest and just remove the bolt and look down the bore to line up the bullseye - that should get you pretty close - then just adjust the scope until its on the bullseye too

also, here's a link to Winchester's online ballistic calculator

http://www.winchester.com/learning-center/ballistics-calculator/Pages/ballistics-calculator-silverlight.aspx

its pretty fun - just wish we could put more variables into it
it'll give you the trajectory and an idea where to look for the bullet hole - high or low at whatever range

and by the way - there is a pretty cool app for rifle scope adjustment here's a link to one I was looking at
http://www.accuscopeusa.com/smartphone-apps.html

if you don't have a smart phone (I don't) or tablet (I got one $150) - maybe you could borrow someone's - someone you know real well

Rule3
October 22, 2013, 07:31 PM
Rule
if you got off the original bore sighting

the Ruger Scout is a bolt, isn't it?
can't you put it on a rest and just remove the bolt and look down the bore to line up the bullseye - that should get you pretty close - then just adjust the scope until its on the bullseye too

also, here's a link to Winchester's online ballistic calculator

http://www.winchester.com/learning-center/ballistics-calculator/Pages/ballistics-calculator-silverlight.aspx

its pretty fun - just wish we could put more variables into it
it'll give you the trajectory and an idea where to look for the bullet hole - high or low at whatever range

Yes. I was keeping this "event" shortened":D I originally had it boresighted with a collmenator (sp)type. My LGS does it for me and he is usually spot on. Went to range without my spotting scope and screwed around at 25 yards and finally got it. Then I took the scope off (it has Burris quick levers (another story not happy with them) I then did the eyeball through the bore, which was OK.(doing that even on a rest, you have to remove the bolt with the rifle moving a hair or its messed up.
I checked it with a new fangled laser beam type and it was OK but then at the range it was screwed up again, shot another 30 rounds, which brings us back to the Burris tactical Quick levers, seems they got just a bit loose and the scope was moving!!

So I have an e mail in to Burris and tried calling sat on hold for hours so there you have it!:eek:

I shot better with the iron peep sights! Never had this much trouble with a rifle scope!.

I am going to return the expensive QD lever rings and just get regular ones.

I like Burris optics but do folks know they are part of Beretta now and the damn rings are made in China??!!! Think I will get some Warne rings.

rcmodel
October 22, 2013, 07:39 PM
If the scope does .5" @100 yards what does each click do @200 yards, 300 yards and 400 yards?Guys!

This ain't rocket science!

Whatever the click value is at 100 yards?

It is half that at 50 yards and 1/4 that at 25 yards.

On the flip side.

It doubles at 200 yards, and x3 at 300, x4 at 400, etc.

rc

Jim Watson
October 22, 2013, 07:55 PM
I think it easiest to remember that the adjustment is one inch (or 1/2" or 1/4" or 1/8" depending on the sight) PER HUNDRED YARDS.

If you have quarter minute clicks that move the zero 1/4" at a hundred yards, then 50 yards is half a hundred, so the sight change is half of 1/4" or 1/8". Shoot at 300 yards, then it is three times a hundred, so the sight change is three times 1/4" or 3/4".

taliv
October 23, 2013, 04:36 PM
The math isn't unique to scopes. It's just a proportional or linear relationship. It's the exact same thing as if a recipie for a loaf of bread called for a cup of flour. If you want to make 2 loaves or 1/2 a loaf how much flour do you need?

rcmodel
October 23, 2013, 07:28 PM
I don't think they teach that stuff in grade school anymore!! :D

rc

Walkalong
October 24, 2013, 09:36 AM
Naw, that's strictly graduate work now. :D


Heck, I just guesstimate with my eyes and do the clicks, shoot again and adjust if needed. Once it's on it's on.

Yep, 1/2" clicks are big if you don't remember to adjust your thinking.

Kp321
October 24, 2013, 05:33 PM
Although Burris usually is top quality, some scopes do not track adjustments well. You make a change and the scope moves to the new setting over a series of shots. This is very frustrating and can waste a lot of ammo. I tap the adjustment bezel of the scope with a screwdriver handle to make sure the adjustment is "settled in".

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