Who Makes the Sharpest Knife?


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stressed
October 26, 2013, 02:24 AM
Interesting.

Who makes the hardest, sharpest knife available? That model?

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ugaarguy
October 26, 2013, 03:04 AM
I moved this here from the Chinese knife discussion thread because it's a great question, and really deserves its own thread to discuss.

I'll start things out. Often, the sharpest knife isn't the hardest. Carbides are the predominant factor in making a knife hard. Yet, if there's too much carbon in the alloy the carbides tend to be large. These large carbides actually result in reduced edge stability, which prevents the blade from being sharpened to as an acute angle. Sandvik 13C26 is widely used in cutlery, and it's a near identical copy of Uddeholm AEB-L. AEB-L was originally developed as a razor blade steel, and it's really more of a medium carbon steel. However, the low carbon to chromium ratio in the alloy results in a very fine grain structure. This fine grain structure allows AEB-L to be polished to a very fine, very acute edge.

The counter to this is that a harder steel with larger carbides will typically hold its edge longer than a softer, finer grained steel. Such steels will typically take a pretty sharp working edge, and retain that edge for a long time.

Another factor is that the higher the hardness a steel is heat treated to, the more brittle it becomes. This results in a blade that isn't very tough or durable.

That's as much amateur metallurgy as I can muster at this hour, so I'll leave this to the experts to elaborate on.

Cryogaijin
October 26, 2013, 08:58 AM
Oversimplified answer: virtually any zirconium blades. There are reasons you need diamond sharpening tools to sharpen them.

OTOH they're useless outside a very narrow area of use: too brittle. Torque the blade at all and it will snap. I've snapped Zirconium paring knives dicing potatos. Still for what they do they're much sharper and easier to maintain than metal knives, right up until *crack*

hso
October 26, 2013, 11:43 AM
Who makes the hardest, sharpest knife available?

"Sharpest" isn't a term easily understood. Sharp for what cutting task can be different. Soft materials like meat or foam cut differently than rope or some fabrics. Fine vs. toothy edges cut those materials differently and are therefore "sharp" differently. Toothy is "sharpest" on materials that fine wouldn't be and vice/versa.

Hard isn't what most people mean either. Hard and wear resistant and tough are all terms people use with "hard" being said when they mean wear resistant or even sometimes tough. Hardness is simply the resistance to indentation/deformation and is easy to test with a Rockwell Hardness tester, but that doesn't mean the material is resistant to wear and will "hold an edge" for a long time. Too hard and the edges chip and "sharpness" is lost. Toughness also isn't hardness, but it is a characteristic sought in knives to resist twisting/bending repeatedly without breaking. There's commonly an inverse relationship between hardness and toughness. Resistance to wear is often the performance characteristic that people commonly seek since it equates well to edge holding.

It is better to specify the performance you want to see. Cuts rope or meat, holds and edge well or easy to sharpen, keen or toothy, resists breakage.

lobo9er
October 26, 2013, 11:56 AM
There is no answer. Most knives NIB from the factory are not as "sharp" as they have the potential to be. Which knives consistently come sharp out of the box from factory might be a better question, but doesn't help conclude which is a better knife.
I have a Ozark MTN walmart knife that I just sharpened up that is a razor right now but it doesn't make it a better knife than the BK 14 I use to make kindling by the fire because it isn't currently hair popping. I would imagine the throw away razors in box cutters are as sharp or sharper than production blades but it doesn't mean thats what you want camping.

And as HSO said harder isn't always better.

mole
October 26, 2013, 12:10 PM
Hardest and sharpest? A flintknapper. It'll be a small, brittle blade though since to have only "one" edge you'll be stuck with a large flake.

allaroundhunter
October 26, 2013, 12:18 PM
Little (general) lesson in materials.

The harder a material is, the harder it is to machine. In this case, sharpen.

The harder a material is, the less ductile and more brittle it is.


There is always trade-off, so knowing what you want out of a knife will help you determine what material you should be looking for.

Shanghai McCoy
October 26, 2013, 02:19 PM
The sharpest that I have seen straight from the factory are the Mora blades.

Sam Cade
October 26, 2013, 02:24 PM
The sharpest that I have seen straight from the factory are the Mora blades.

That is a great example of the confluence of fine grained steel, aggressive edge geometry and a thin blade.

hso
October 26, 2013, 08:07 PM
Sharpest, as in cut you the easiest, I ever handled were the original Blackjack convex edge knives and the Microtechs. A buddy sliced his fingerprint off so finely with a BJK that it didn't bleed.

GLOOB
October 26, 2013, 09:18 PM
I can get a pretty sharp edge on anything. And I don't own any expensive knifes. But...

The sharpest knife I have, by far, is a Mora woodcarving knife. It's sharper than my straight razor. The laminated carbon steel is Rockwell 61, or so.

My Svord Peasant turned out incredibly sharp, once the secondary bevel was polished up a hair. It think it takes a keener edge than most of my regular carbon steel Moras. I don't know the hardness.

My Mora #1 takes a keener edge than my other plain carbon Moras. It must have gotten a different heat treat, or whatnot. I have shaved my face with it.

My woodcarving knife has the original scandi edge. My other Moras have been reground to full convex. And the Peasant has the original crude saber grind on it; the secondary is fairly obtuse. I think the absolute sharpness of the edge is limited by the steels rather than the grinds, though.

snapshot762
October 27, 2013, 02:11 PM
The sharpest knife (out of the box) i have ever owned was a Chris Reeve one piece hollow handled SableIV.

theboyscout
October 27, 2013, 02:37 PM
I truly like MORA knives, they are an inexpensive knife that is tough as can be.

http://moraofsweden.com/knife-care-1.0.263.2

Knife steels contain between 0.4 to 0.7% Carbon and between 13 and 18% Chromium. Carbon is necessary to make the steel hardenable and Chromium to is present to prevent corrosion ie rust. In general it can be said that Carbon contents below 0.5% are not to be recommended for professional usage since it is not possible to achieve sufficient hardness. When grinding knives used for the finishing operations, the total grinding angle should be around 25°. If this angle is less, whilst the knife will be extremely sharp, it will also mean that the knife condition will also be very sensitive since the extreme knife edge point will easily be folded over when coming in contact with harder objects. Boning knives on the other hand are ground to higher angle, approx. 35° and thereby up to tougher usage and heavier work on the knife edge even though this is at the expense of a somewhat higher cutting resistance

Deltaboy
October 27, 2013, 03:58 PM
Same here .

clearcut
October 29, 2013, 12:22 AM
flaked obsidian I think is the sharpest but you have to re flake it often.
CC

hso
October 29, 2013, 07:42 AM
Not that this is what I think we're actaully asking, but ultramicrotomes (http://www.udel.edu/biology/Wags/b617/micro/micro.htm) are probably the sharpest, but they do one thing and they're not tough. The concave glass or diamond blades are used depending upon material being sectioned.

Bikewer
October 29, 2013, 03:34 PM
The folks mentioning obsidian have a point. You can only get steel so sharp... Has to do with the micro structure of the material.
If you look at a very sharp edge under an electron microscope, it looks pretty much like a saw. Rather jagged, but all the little "jags" are in the same direction.
When such an edge gets dull, the little jags are all over the place.

Obsidian (or other glass items) fractures down to a single molecule. You can't really get any sharper than that practically, although engineers have produced a "needle" point down to a single atom... Using a scanning-tunneling electron microscope that allows the manipulation of single atoms.

As noted there's a fine line between ultimate sharpness and durability.

lobo9er
October 29, 2013, 11:48 PM
good post bikewer. interesting

SlamFire1
October 31, 2013, 06:07 PM
I saw a History Channel program on knives and they were going down the Cutco knife production line. At the end was a sharpness tester, looked to be an industrial piece of equipment. Used a special type of paper and the knife was put in a fixture and it was determined how many cuts the edge could make.

So this was a standardized way of testing sharpeness. Don’t know where you could find a tester and expect it would cost $$$. Maybe $$,$$$.00

The basic problem with all of the opinions you find on the web, on who makes the sharpest knives, is a lack of an agreed on standard test to compare edges and edge retention. Some people cut cardboard, which is a severe test in my opinion, others cut rope, some cut bricks and complain when the knife fails.

hso
October 31, 2013, 06:40 PM
There are agreed upon standards for testing "sharpness", just not commonly known outside of knife websites.

Informally, those standards are - draw cut of newsprint or toilet paper without ripping, how many push cuts of 1/2" sisal rope before the edge dulls and tears the paper, how many inches of draw cuts of corrugated cardboard before the edge dulls and tears the paper, how many lays of free hanging 1" sisal rope can be cut with one pass, back to nontearing cuts on newsprint/toilet paper.

Formally, there are machines to achieve the same thing and make the counts.


Then there are the ABS competition requirements - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GhlL1wLuZxw

ugaarguy
October 31, 2013, 06:44 PM
Slamfire, the machine you're referring to is a CATRA Knife & Blade Cutting Test Machine (http://www.catra.org/pages/products/kniveslevel1/slt.htm). They're no doubt incredibly expensive because CATRA states there are only 32 in use in the world. CATRA also makes a sharpness tester (http://www.catra.org/pages/products/kniveslevel1/st.htm) which measures pure sharpness rather than cutting performance with a wear factor.

hso
October 31, 2013, 07:43 PM
Other methods besides the Catra REST - http://bladetest.infillplane.com/html/testing_sharpness.html
http://sharpedgetester.com/products

GLOOB
November 1, 2013, 06:51 AM
As far as hardest, Ragweed Forge sells Ultra High Carbon Roselli knife blades with HRC 64-66. That's pretty darn hard. Especially considering they're scandi ground, sharpening could take some time. They recommend diamond sharpening stones.

Phaedrus/69
November 1, 2013, 07:24 AM
Judging a knife by the OOtB edge is like judging a car by how much gas is in the tank when you buy it. You would expect (or at least hope) that the knife is sharp OOTB (out of the box) but it won't be nearly as sharp as it can get. This is because it takes a lot of work to get a truly superior edge, and it can't be completely automated. So a human has to do a lot of hand/hand-machine work to do it, and that costs money. And there's a point of diminishing returns to consider; how much extra sharpness is the worth the extra money? How many will appreciate it?

Hardness with knife blades is generally expressed a number on the Rockwell scale. This number isn't linear; that is to say, 51 RC isn't 2% harder than 50 RC, it's a magnitude harder. At any rate, hardness has little to do with toughness. For example a glass or ceramic knife will be very, very hard- harder than most steels can get. But it won't be tough. You can easily chip the edge of a glass knife even though it's very hard. So you have to look at toughness, but edge stability is another factor. Many of the attributes we like to have in a knife are mutually exclusive. Raising one attribute often lowers another.

Hard knives may be a little harder to sharpen but not necessarily. Super Aogomi is often hardened to around 65 RC but it's relatively easy to sharpen. Steels with things that make it tougher, like vanadium, make the knife harder to sharpen but not physically harder. In a sense steel is little like concrete, or peanut brittle. The steel is like the concrete while the vanadium carbides are like the aggregate. Put another way the carbides are like the peanuts.

If you're asking which knives are the sharpest OOTB that's also tricky. Sharp can mean a lot of things. A polished edge may shave hair well and push cut so you'll call it very sharp...until you try to cut rope with it and it won't cut well. Likewise a knife that will rip through cardboard boxes all day seems sharp until you go to shave hair- then it's just ripping hairs out.

But as far as OOTB sharpness goes, Mora knives are usually very, very sharp. There's a little variation but you have maybe a 95% chance of getting a Mora that will be very very sharp. Bark River knives are pretty sharp OOTB, too. If you get one of the ones made in Taiwan (not China) the SOG Field Pup is sharp OOTB. And I'd say virtually every Spyderco I've ever seen was quite sharp OOTB.

hso
November 1, 2013, 09:15 AM
The Diamond Blade folks get remarkable sharpness and durability out of their process.

Valkman
November 1, 2013, 06:42 PM
Judging a knife by the OOtB edge is like judging a car by how much gas is in the tank when you buy it.

Yep, all new knives go on my Wicked Edge for some real sharpening. That's the answer: knives I own are the sharpest. :D

Officers'Wife
November 1, 2013, 10:05 PM
It depends on a what use you are putting the knife too. General purpose knives about any 220 stainless is going to give you good service. The more specific the task the more the material changes.

rcmodel
November 1, 2013, 10:19 PM
I don't really see this question as relevant.

No matter who ships the sharpest knife from the factory??

It won't be the 'sharpest' any longer after you use it a few times.

Then you got to figure out how to make it that sharp again!!

And that's the real hard question, depending on your skill level at sharpening knives.

Factory edges ground on a CNC machine at an unknown angle with a diamond plate are hard to duplicate at home alone with a old whet-stone.

rc

Sam Cade
November 1, 2013, 11:13 PM
an unknown angle
with a diamond plate
is hard to duplicate

at home alone with a old whet-stone.



A little tweak and you have poetry. :cool:



Sharpest, as in cut you the easiest


Some of my inlaws owned a Japanese restaurant and one of their staff had brought over some sort of gargantuan chisel ground fish-knife, a bit like an overgrown yanagi. After 30 seconds of cutting vegetables with it I -very carefully- cleaned it and returned it to its owner and asked for a different knife. Not only was it the absolute sharpest knife I've ever used it was too large for me to control.

alsask
November 2, 2013, 11:16 AM
The sharpest out of the box knife I have ever owned is a Blackjack. Second sharpest was is a Mora carbon steel blade. I can re-sharpen the Mora just as sharp as the Blackjack however.

I find convex edges easiest to re-sharpen followed by the scandi grinds.

jeepnik
November 2, 2013, 10:08 PM
The sharpest, bar none is from Havalon. Not elegant, but they are designed to change the blade. One get dull, throw it away and put in a new one. I think they use surgical scalpel blades.

http://www.havalon.com/

I bought the first one to use as a "work" knife. They held up so well I've now used them for various outdoor chores including field dressing.

CA Raider
November 12, 2013, 01:06 AM
lots of fancy answers here. i dont use exotic blades myself.
practically - my Emmerson folder has about the sharpest blade for any of the knives I own. the alloy isnt proprietary - cant remember what it is off the top of my head. its one of the more expensive alloys, and it takes a great edge. so check the Emmersons if you want something really sharp. but I'm not saying other brands dont use that steel - some do.

CA R

ugaarguy
November 12, 2013, 02:16 AM
The sharpest, bar none is from Havalon.
The sharpest knife at SHOT a few years ago, as tested on a CATRA machine, was one of Ed Schempp's personal folders with a VG-10 blade. Unless there's test documentation about the Havalon knives your assertion is just a guess.
practically - my Emmerson folder has about the sharpest blade for any of the knives I own. the alloy isnt proprietary - cant remember what it is off the top of my head. its one of the more expensive alloys, and it takes a great edge. so check the Emmersons if you want something really sharp. but I'm not saying other brands dont use that steel - some do.
Emerson uses 154 CM, the American version of ATS-34. It was the hot thing to have 15+ years ago, but now it's not even expensive to buy for small scale custom builder. Benchmade still uses it heavily, and their knives sell for about 1/2 the price of a comparable Emerson. Spyderco has moved onto more expensive steels like VG-10 and CPM-S30V, yet they keep their prices in direct competition with Benchmade. Ernest Emerson is a heck of a knife designer, and knives are well made: They're just expensive compared to their peers.

Glock Doctor
November 12, 2013, 04:47 AM
In a production knife: Victorinox! I carry a, 'Sentinel' with a thumb-hole in its partially serrated blade, and a pocket clip on the handle. (It's more than enough knife for me; and nobody ever looks twice at it.)

http://www2.knifecenter.com/item/VN54886/Victorinox-Swiss-Army-One-Hand-Sentinel-with-Clip-Serrated-Edge-4-38-inch-Handle

lobo9er
November 12, 2013, 08:27 AM
Just got a new Buck woodsman that came pretty darn sharp outta the box. It cut PAPER! :) Into shreds. I got a little lost with that one. But what can be funner with a new blade but to get some quick gratification by shredding paper?
But this is still like asking who makes the hottest fire. The only question that could be answered is which steel composition will allow for the finest edge. And still each knife is going to vary by how it was sharpened.

CA Raider
November 13, 2013, 12:53 AM
"They're just expensive compared to their peers. "

true. I only own one Emmerson. and that's why :-)
Thanks for the advice on the 154CM alloy designation.
I'm very happy with it.

i would never argue against VG-10. that's a great alloy.

CA R

TNBilly
November 13, 2013, 11:40 AM
Been following this thread learning a lot as I go......... I'm wondering though how do ceramic blades fare as hunting knives if there are any? Would require diamond sharpening but any thoughts as to "sharpness" and edge life?

ugaarguy
November 13, 2013, 03:30 PM
Billy, ceramic can take a very fine edge, but it's brittle. The manufacturers have gotten better at making it more impact resistant than the early ceramic kitchen knives that would literally shatter if dropped from more than a few inches above a counter or cutting board, but it's still too brittle for any real outdoor use.

HoosierQ
November 13, 2013, 05:00 PM
I am with RC here. The question is practically relevant only if two things are true a) you can't sharpen a knife, and b) you can afford to keep buying new ones whenever they get dull. Heck, I sharpen my stanley knife I use for leather work. I use a ceramic rod. Sharpen it before every cut. I use it until the tip breaks off and only then change the blade.

Knife sharpening is difficult but it is a skill that will serve you very well.

TNBilly
November 17, 2013, 04:28 PM
ugaarguy

lost this thread so didn't get back timely.

thanks for the response on ceramics.... I'd pretty well figured they were probably too delicate for our purposes.

In my past experiences what I hate most is trying to figure which knife is going to hold and edge and take one with the least trouble. I've found you "generally" can put a heck of an edge on most any blade but the "sharp" time varies immensely. I'd always liked Case pockets but have found over the years most of their stainless is junk, unless you get over the $50 mark. The older carbon steel blades sharpen up nice but if you really use it the edge is short lived. About the strangest old knife I have is an old Precise hunters fixed blade. It originally came with a more or less rounded shape edge which while you could use a hammer and pound on it, it was so tough, it left a little to be desired for sharpness. I hollow ground the edge with a 25 degree finish and have been well satisfied since. Whatever the stainless is it holds a good edge and it still a tough edge.

Officers'Wife
November 17, 2013, 05:32 PM
Just got a new Buck woodsman that came pretty darn sharp outta the box. It cut PAPER! :) Into shreds. I got a little lost with that one. But what can be funner with a new blade but to get some quick gratification by shredding paper?
But this is still like asking who makes the hottest fire. The only question that could be answered is which steel composition will allow for the finest edge. And still each knife is going to vary by how it was sharpened.
Cutting paper???? That is a sure way to ruin an edge!! Shame on you!

My late uncle used to check how sharp one of his newly forged knives were by swinging it at a length of 1/2" sisal rope hanging from a rafter, if it cut through it was sharp enough, if the end wrapped around the knife or his hand it needed more sharpening.

Added thought: I've been told the proper way to check the sharpness of a knife is to gently rub the blade against your arm with the grain of the hair. If it shaves the hair it's serviceable, if not... "you could ride to town on the edge. You do know a dull knife will hurt you a lot quicker than a sharp one. Get your buns out to the shop and sharpen it now!

(Stern parental lecture #28)

351 WINCHESTER
November 17, 2013, 06:41 PM
The Swedish Moras and other like Swedish knives are the sharpest I've ever encountered.

hso
November 17, 2013, 08:59 PM
Cutting paper???? That is a sure way to ruin an edge!! Shame on you!

That's incorrect.

I've been told the proper way to check the sharpness of a knife is to gently rub the blade against your arm with the grain of the hair.

That's just one way, therefore not the "proper" way, to check and is handy since most folks have an arm handy if they're checking an edge. ;)

Shaving hair without touching the skin, shaving fingernail smoothly, cutting news print held horizontally without ripping, even cutting toilet paper are all proper "field" methods folks use to test sharpness. Cutting a soft tomato along with the sharpness testing machines that measure force are even better.

As pointed out, a sharp edge may not be easily maintained depending upon the materials the edge encounters.

craftsman
November 21, 2013, 04:26 PM
By "sharpest" if you mean "kewlest looking" - that is a matter of perference! LOL

If you mean able to get the cutting edge to the smallest width possible, then the white blade ceramic, zirconium dioxide (ZrO2; also known as zirconia) comes in as #2, and the black blade ceramic, Zirconium Carbide is #1. Both, however, are very very brittle - made more for slicing than anything else. Next best and most useful is a high carbon steel. Preferably, one made in the traditional Japanese fashion
( http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/japb/hd_japb.htm ) or of damascus steel.

I've had my Zirconium Dioxide in the kitchen for over a decade and my Carbide is 8 years old, both are as sharp as the day I bought them - never sharpened.

jakk280rem
November 22, 2013, 02:04 AM
I'll let the others talk about what the sharpest knife is and tell you what the sharpest knife I've ever seen come out of a box. It was a Seki Japan made 440C knife branded under the Walther name. It has a skeletonized blade and is only a couple inches long. It also has a mirror polished blade and is capable of cutting the tissue paper the knife came in using only the weight of the knife. A close second was a Japanese made Gerber also made of 440C. I see a pattern here.

GLOOB
December 2, 2013, 04:27 PM
Since regrinding it, I am simply fascinated with the blade on my Svord Peasant. It sharpens incredibly fast and easy. I feel like a monkey could sharpen this knife. And that edge holds up impossibly well. I put an edge on the knife that I was sure would fold, but it just keeps cutting. Periodically running a nail down the blade continually surprised me by revealing a single, unified edge that will still peel a hair.

This prompted me to do a little research. From what I can guess, Svord uses 15N20 bandsaw steel. It appears that some knife makers have perfected the heat treat of L6 and/or 15N20 steel in order to obtain large amounts of fine-grained bainite. The major limitation is that this kind of steel doesn't come in thick stock.

For a sub $20.00 knife, this might be one to try. I have some super hard high carbon woodcarving knives, and this blade matches or beats them all (at least within my own limitations in sharpening ability). The nickel in the steel seems to add just a tiny bit of corrosion resistance, to boot.

Maybe I got one that is exceptional, but this knife makes my 1095 carbon knives seem like pure junk. Between the ease of sharpening and the durability, this is a knife that will more than likely be crazy sharp every time I pick it up.

Sam Cade
December 2, 2013, 08:58 PM
From what I can guess, Svord uses 15N20 bandsaw steel. It appears that some knife makers have perfected the heat treat of L6 and/or 15N20 steel in order to obtain large amounts of fine-grained bainite. The major limitation is that this kind of steel doesn't come in thick stock.

Svord is L6 I think.

I've made some practice stuff from 1/8" 15n20 and it does indeed get stupid sharp...and shiny.

meef
December 2, 2013, 09:28 PM
Bikewer: The folks mentioning obsidian have a point.Naw.

They have an edge.

:D

RetiredUSNChief
December 2, 2013, 09:51 PM
What it's to be used for makes a lot of difference, too.

Sharp edge, and retention/maintenance of the same, is what's important. For shaving, a common straight edge is an excellent example...it's sharp enough to literally shave hairs off your face, yet soft enough to properly maintain via stroping. Use it for anything else and it'll fail in short order.

For kitchen use, a variety of edge designs is important, depending on the intended use of the blade. Because of this, a variety of materials and hardness/toughness may be used. Take, for example, the serrated edge of a bread knife vs. the meat cleaver's wide, stout edge.


Hardness/toughness is a balance that's variable and depends on both blade design and intended use for an optimum utilitarian use. Ain't no super-blade out there that is infinately sharp and infinately strong.

Officers'Wife
December 3, 2013, 07:29 AM
The Swedish Moras and other like Swedish knives are the sharpest I've ever encountered.
Ah the Swedes, they couldn't build ships very well but they did have making high carbon steel down to an art. Somewhere around here I have a book (reprinted in the 1800's) of a 16th century monk describing a Swedish blacksmith making steel. A brick box was filled half full of charcoal, then the pig iron ingots placed on top then finished filled with charcoal. The charcoal at the bottom was set fire then the top sealed. After several days of soaking in fire the now steel ingots were fished out, the "blister" removed and the steel folded to manufacture tools. Interesting story but not worth learning Latin to read.

GLOOB
December 8, 2013, 08:29 PM
I got a couple more Peasants to play with. I ground the blade even thinner on these two.

Well, I did find the limit of the steel. I have an edge on the one that will roll when making aggressive cuts in wood across the grain. But even so, the rolled edge comes right back into alignment on a stone, let alone a steel.

On my mini peasant, I put an even finer edge. It shaves better than my straight razor.

Now one oddity I've noticed with these Svords is that the edge works up a burr quite easily, and the burr is quite difficult to remove. After some use with these knives, I might occasionally be able to see tiny flecks of wire edge pushed to this side or the other (mainly on the thinner ones, but to some degree all of them). But yet, the blade still cuts cleanly without catching. I can't even feel this with a fingernail, yet I can see it glint in the light. This burr disappears with a stroke on a stone or a steel, but it might reappear, later. It may be I'm technically cutting on a partial wire edge with these knives, but if so, that edge is sharp and it lasts.

I like these knives.

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