Ramrods


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rodwha
October 26, 2013, 12:09 PM
I recently inquired about thinks made by a fellow who makes $10 custom punches. Among other things he makes fiberglass ramrods for $20.

When he told me it was fiberglass it conjured up images of the one that came with my Lyman's rifle, which is quite flexible.

Nope. It's rigid and comes with a brass jag attached to the end with both ends being threaded. Nice! These are made to length.

He's a retired machinist and makes a lot of things.

dwwoodworker@yaoo.com

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Col4570
October 26, 2013, 12:22 PM
http://i1052.photobucket.com/albums/s452/livebattery/003-7.jpg (http://s1052.photobucket.com/user/livebattery/media/003-7.jpg.html)
Fibreglass rod is excellent for Ramrods.Here is a Range Rod using 9mm Rod and a small Brass Doorknob.

kwhi43@kc.rr.com
October 26, 2013, 01:41 PM
I assume that you know if you use a rod such as this without a muzzle guard
that it will ruin your barrel. It will make your crown out of round. More barrels
have been ruined with the use of these than anything else.

rodwha
October 26, 2013, 02:04 PM
To whom is that directed? And why does it batter the crown?

Zeke/PA
October 26, 2013, 04:03 PM
I made one piece Aluminum range rods for myself and several shooting buddies but I also furnished Aluminum short starters which, for whatever reason, many shooters refuse to use. A short starter makes even a flexable fiberglass rod easier to use.

BHP FAN
October 26, 2013, 04:16 PM
I always use a muzzle guard, unless I'm hunting. Track of the Wolf has 'em cheap.That being said, I think a steel barrel is harder than fiberglass, or wood. Sure, particles of lead and solvent could make a slurry on your patch, but again, lead is also...softer than steel. I think it would take a long while to wear out the barrel this way.

Doak
October 26, 2013, 04:21 PM
Glass, as in fiberglass, is extremely hard...and sharp, at the microscopic level.

Imagine scraping the crown, at the muzzle, w/a shard of broken bottle glass.

Same thing happens w/a fiberglass ramrod, only at a microscopic level.

Solid nylon/plastic rods, ie. "super-rods" sold by most of the BP suppliers are the way to go.

Regardless what rod is used, a muzzle protector should be used. I use plastic detergent bottle caps. Cut away everything that doesn't look like a sleeve w/a brim around it. They come in different sizes, depending the size of the bottle.

Slide the plastic sleeve down the rod to the tip, start the rod, insert the sleeve into the muzzle. Hold the sleeve in place w/support hand pressure on the brim.

Aluminum is a poor material for rods because of "imbedability" of abrasive particulate matter in the aluminum: making the aluminum rod a "lap".

Kindest Regards,
Doak

BHP FAN
October 26, 2013, 04:31 PM
OK, now it makes sense, but I still think it would take a loooong time. I like your home made muzzle protector idea. My dad made one out of the snap on top for a plastic honey bear.

Col4570
October 26, 2013, 05:13 PM
A Brass Muzzle guard slipped over your Fibreglass rod does the trick.

Doak
October 26, 2013, 05:44 PM
Ramrods also bow in the middle when pushed.

Then the fiberglass rod abrades the lands in the middle of the barrel.

To each his own, but I stay away from the dern things. :-D

Another thing I see alotta shooters do, is bounce the rod on the seated ball. They can tell, by the indications of the bounce, if the ball is seated, to their liking, the same way each load.

Not a bad idea, except for one detail: When the brass tip on the rod bounces, it peens the lands of the rifling in front of the ball.

Barrel steel is soft, and brass can dent the corners of the lands. The more ya do it, the more it deforms the lands. This leads to other problems later on.

I think it's better to place a folded rag over the end of the rod, and pull down on the rod w/the same force each time, avoiding the bouncing.

Kindest Regards,
Doak

kwhi43@kc.rr.com
October 26, 2013, 06:41 PM
Why do you think they make fiberglass rods to sharpen knives for? Fiberglass
rods will cut steel just fine. Aluminum is soft, but it will pick up a abrasives.
Also the aluminum will oxadise, and that is much harder than the aluminum
and will cut steel. The best and what ever the people I shoot with, we all use
steel rods with a plastic muzzle guard on them. I have both nylon and brass
muzzle guards.

http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o127/prizzel/a302e21ccb48bb51a8fae61884d5a147.jpg

rodwha
October 26, 2013, 07:08 PM
Gotcha.

I hadn't heard anything really about the need for this. I assumed that since it wasn't steel or anything harder it wouldn't damage things, much like using brass pieces and such.

Guess I need to add one of those to my Grafs cart!

kwhi43@kc.rr.com
October 26, 2013, 07:22 PM
I just didn't want anybody to ruin a barrel. Another way to make a guard is to
take a brass case like a 30-30 or what have you and drill out the back say to
1/4 inch and use a 1/4 rod . This will save your muzzle. The tapered case will
fit more than one caliber. This works great!

rodwha
October 26, 2013, 07:23 PM
I see Grafs does not offer them...

But Dixie does. I haven't ordered from them as I've been waiting a very looooong time for the .45 cal pistol speed loader tubes. And since I have to mail order my powder I've been dealing with Grafs.

Zeke/PA
October 26, 2013, 08:01 PM
Glass, as in fiberglass, is extremely hard...and sharp, at the microscopic level.

Imagine scraping the crown, at the muzzle, w/a shard of broken bottle glass.

Same thing happens w/a fiberglass ramrod, only at a microscopic level.

Solid nylon/plastic rods, ie. "super-rods" sold by most of the BP suppliers are the way to go.

Regardless what rod is used, a muzzle protector should be used. I use plastic detergent bottle caps. Cut away everything that doesn't look like a sleeve w/a brim around it. They come in different sizes, depending the size of the bottle.

Slide the plastic sleeve down the rod to the tip, start the rod, insert the sleeve into the muzzle. Hold the sleeve in place w/support hand pressure on the brim.

Aluminum is a poor material for rods because of "imbedability" of abrasive particulate matter in the aluminum: making the aluminum rod a "lap".

Kindest Regards,
Doak
I furnish a brass muzzle guide with the aluminum rods that I make so in reality the rod never touches the barrel if used properly.

kwhi43@kc.rr.com
October 26, 2013, 08:13 PM
http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o127/prizzel/277a7080f111ce36ea7c18046d6c5d8e.jpg


http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o127/prizzel/be8beb02884ea417379282422a97b339.jpg


http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o127/prizzel/9b9da059434938319ff8ae1e94aca28f.jpg

Rattus58
October 27, 2013, 02:59 AM
I recently inquired about thinks made by a fellow who makes $10 custom punches. Among other things he makes fiberglass ramrods for $20.

When he told me it was fiberglass it conjured up images of the one that came with my Lyman's rifle, which is quite flexible.

Nope. It's rigid and comes with a brass jag attached to the end with both ends being threaded. Nice! These are made to length.

He's a retired machinist and makes a lot of things.

dwwoodworker@yaoo.com
Just know that I have no problems with a fiberglass rod especially when used with a (as all should in my opinion) a bore guide. However, I got excoriated by some dude on Cast Bullets (Waksupi or whatever) about how he could saw through a muzzleloader barrel in an hour with a fiberglass rod. :D :cool:

Rattus58
October 27, 2013, 03:19 AM
Ramrods also bow in the middle when pushed.

Then the fiberglass rod abrades the lands in the middle of the barrel.

To each his own, but I stay away from the dern things. :-D

Another thing I see alotta shooters do, is bounce the rod on the seated ball. They can tell, by the indications of the bounce, if the ball is seated, to their liking, the same way each load.

Not a bad idea, except for one detail: When the brass tip on the rod bounces, it peens the lands of the rifling in front of the ball.

Barrel steel is soft, and brass can dent the corners of the lands. The more ya do it, the more it deforms the lands. This leads to other problems later on.

I think it's better to place a folded rag over the end of the rod, and pull down on the rod w/the same force each time, avoiding the bouncing.

Kindest Regards,
Doak
I've heard this bending in the middle story and with my White I pulled the breech plug to see just how this would happen. I'm not arguing with you about it, I'm sure that it could happen, I just don't buy it. If you load properly, 4 to 6 inches at a time with a bore guide I'm thinking that it is damn well impossible.

Second, I've been taught to use slip fit bullets, bullets sized to the bore or maybe a thousandth over... and THAT aint gonna do it either. Patched roundballs. If not slick enough I can see the possibility without using a bore guide.. but not with my patched balls slicked up according to the Dutch Shultze techniques... and THAT aint happening either....

If you all want to know what I think and in my opinion what wears the bores are patches run over the debris field in the bore. This is why I also use wads over powder....

As to pinging the ramrod off the lead ball or bullet... really? Consistent is it? And of course you do no damage to the bullet when you do this... which on the nose isn't anywhere as critical as it is in the base but why do it... over powder wads allow you to tamp the powder then just slide the ball or bullet on the powder without stress. Works every time.

The foregoing of course is strictly my opinion.... :D :cool:

Steel Horse Rider
October 27, 2013, 09:46 AM
I think a lot of internet advice and warnings are similar to the government cancer warnings. Something COULD give you cancer if to used it 10,000 times in excess of its normal use, sure, but will it in normal use? NO.

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