Guest hunting in the US?


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Oleson
October 28, 2013, 07:37 AM
As the title says, how would a Norwegian (me) be able to hunt in the US?
I have the option of using some agencies (spellcheck) but there is one more thing to consider. In Colorado and Arizona, I have more relatives than I can count. Me and my dad was thinking of visiting them. And we can't just visit a new place without trying some of the local hunting. :)
What are the posibilities, restrictions?
Bringing my own gun? Renting one?
And so on...

Any corrections on the spelling and grammar are appreciated, I'm always learning. :)

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bainter1212
October 28, 2013, 09:51 AM
Well, restrictions vary from state to state. Figure out which state you want to hunt and visit the appropriate state fish/game website. Your answers should lie there.

Art Eatman
October 28, 2013, 10:18 AM
Coming in on a visa, you'd pay for a non-resident license. Shouldn't be any problem to bring your own rifle; no problem in borrowing. Check with the US embassy in Norway, and also with the airline you plan to use, insofar as bringing your own rifle and/or shotgun.

Patocazador
October 28, 2013, 10:24 AM
Transporting your gun on a commercial airline would be the biggest problem. Some won't transport them and certain countries will confiscate it if you transfer there.

The hardest part here would be to draw a tag (license) for the area you want to hunt.

Oleson
October 28, 2013, 10:30 AM
Thanks for the answers so far.
Let's say some of my relatives own some land on which they can hunt. Will it still be a problem getting a license/tag? Or is owning land not relevant to who controls the hunting?

Patocazador
October 28, 2013, 10:46 AM
There may be landowner tags available in those states. I'm not familiar with the rules in either Arizona or Colorado.
In the US all of the game animals are controlled by the individual states unless it's a migratory bird. The state issues a license making it legal for the hunter to harvest game during the specified seasons.

MCgunner
October 28, 2013, 10:55 AM
Depends on what you want to hunt. Elk, probably have to draw a tag. Some (I'm thinking most) states don't have draws for mule deer or whitetail. Things change, though, and I've not hunted elsewhere, but Texas in 20 years.

ldlfh7
October 28, 2013, 12:08 PM
Deer will probably be your best bet. Non-resident elk tags are pricy.

Oleson
October 28, 2013, 02:08 PM
Okay.
Let's say that "you" are my third cousin, and you have invited me to visit in whatever state "you" live in.
On my trip over, "you" decide to take me hunting. How would that work?

No, I'm not fishing for free hunting or invites ;) just curious.

ldlfh7
October 28, 2013, 02:30 PM
You could tag along for free, but if you wanted to do the shooting you would have to have all the tags, license, etc in order. Laws and regulations vary by state but to actually do the shooting, you need to be legal.

boogieman
October 28, 2013, 03:22 PM
Something to keep in mind. To my knowledge all states require hunter education before license. If I live in NJ and hunt PA I have to first submit proof of prior license (or Hunter ed) in another state. When you come be sure to bring a copy of your hunting license, im assuming that Norway has some type of license procedure. You can likely purchase your licenses via internet prior to your travels.
Colorado--- http://wildlife.state.co.us/RulesRegs/HuntFishRegulationsBrochures/Pages/RegulationsBrochures.aspx

Arizona-- http://www.azgfd.gov/

MCgunner
October 28, 2013, 07:28 PM
Okay.
Let's say that "you" are my third cousin, and you have invited me to visit in whatever state "you" live in.
On my trip over, "you" decide to take me hunting. How would that work?

No, I'm not fishing for free hunting or invites just curious.


Well, if you were going to hunt with ME, you'd just be sitting in a box blind or on a tripod stand one one of my places. Texas is mostly all private land. Now, there's some decent affordable day leasing for hogs in the state, but deer is ridiculous.

What I'D probably do is get us a day hunt for geese. I'm about 20 miles from Eagle Lake, Texas, self proclaimed "goose hunting capital of the world" and there is some first rate guided goose hunting here. It runs about 200 a gun per morning and is usually worth it.

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2009/2994717517_78afb8874d.jpg

Oleson
October 29, 2013, 09:18 AM
Thanks for the advice so far. This is why THR is my favourite US forum :)
If any of you have any questions about hunting here, I have a thread about it.
There should be a link here:_____, but I'm on a tablet right now... Not a techical man...

Grumulkin
October 29, 2013, 09:38 AM
1. You would have to have a hunter education course for either Arizona or Colorado unless you are old enough to have an exemption. So, if you were born in 1951, in many states you would be "grandfathered in" and wouldn't need a hunter education course. You would need to check the regulations of the particular state you wished to hunt in.

I believe in Norway, you're required to take a shooting test to hunt. I would presume you also have to take a written test. It's possible that documentation of that would be sufficient but you would obviously have to have it translated into English.

Also, in many states including Colorado, just having had a hunting license will not be enough.

2. Transporting a rifle on airline travel is not difficult but getting one into the U.S.A. would be. I would highly suggest borrowing a rifle in the U.S.A.

3. As others have alluded to, the highly sought after species require a draw to get a tag to hunt them. That would include such things as elk, sheep and bear and, depending on where you're hunting, others. For big game hunting, deer would probably be your best bet.

Personally, varmint hunting, i.e., coyote, is just as fun as deer hunting and isn't nearly as regulated. In Ohio, you can shoot coyote any time you see them so I shoot them from my front porch.

dogrunner
October 29, 2013, 10:51 AM
Insofar as a hunter safety course goes you could complete an on line course & acquire a certificate that way. I know the State of Florida offers such a course (free at that).........all you'd have to do in addition is to show some proof of firearms competency....gun license/training course would do it.

To the best of my knowledge, the hunter safety courses are recognized nation wide so one should suffice where ever you go.

Don McDowell
October 29, 2013, 10:53 AM
I can't speak to hunting Arizona, but if Colorado is your destination here are some things that should help.
Anyone born after 1949 must have a hunter safety certificate before purchasing a license. You'll need to contact the Colorado division of Wildlife to find out what you may have they would consider as equivalent.
There are several area's there for elk that you can purchase a license over the counter for certain seasons. All the deer licenses are issued by drawing, the application deadline is in April.
Here's the link to the Colorado DOW you can find the answers to most of your questions there http://wildlife.state.co.us/Pages/Home.aspx
Transporting your rifles and ammunition over here will require a fair amount of paper work thru the US Customs and State dept. Might be best in the end just to use one of your cousins rifles.

Grumulkin
October 29, 2013, 11:24 AM
I know the State of Florida offers such a course (free at that).........all you'd have to do in addition is to show some proof of firearms competency....gun license/training course would do it.

I don't think so.

Most of the course is done online but there is still 4 hours of classroom time and 3 hours of range time.

Maybe there are some but I know of no fully online hunter safety courses that can be done by out of state residents.

boogieman
October 29, 2013, 12:43 PM
I had no idea that CO HL was so stringent. I will see a couple guys tonight that hunt NJ and CO and I will ask them what they needed to prove competency.

Don McDowell
October 29, 2013, 01:07 PM
Colorado recognizes all the other states hunter safety cards, so it's not a big deal for US Citizens, the problem for the OP is going to be finding what he has that they will recognize, but that should be easy enough to figure out with a bit of email correspondence with the Colorado DOW.

Fremmer
October 29, 2013, 01:45 PM
Each state has its own rules and regulations for hunting, so you'll need to check for the state hunting regulations in Arizona or Colorado. You'll have to buy a hunting license (or "tag") in that state for the particular animal you want to hunt. Many states use a system that breaks up certain areas within the state into districts or areas, so you'll need a license for that particular area in the state where you plan on hunting. You'll have to pay the license fee and probably prove that you've attended a hunter safety class that is acceptable to the state. And there are limited numbers of licenses issued in each district of each state, so for some hunting licenses ( like elk in Colorado) you'll apply for the license and wait to see if you get picked lottery style to be allowed to buy the license. Each state has it's own license system.

The advantage of private property is that it won't be full of idiots who will shoot first and verify target and what's behind the target later. But you'll still have to get a hunting license for the particular animal in the district where the property is located. There are different periods of time (sometimes only a few weeks long, sometimes longer) during which you are allowed to hunt, and there are different license for different times of the year that depend on the weapon you use (bow, muzzle loader, center fire rifle, etc.).

Oleson
October 29, 2013, 03:19 PM
In Norway, you must have a hunters course. (jegerprÝven)
It consists of nine classes/evenings, one range day and a final exam.
The exam is fifty multiple choice questions, and you must have at least forty right.
For hunting big game (roe deer and up) you must pass a shooters test each year.
And to be able to take the shooters test, you must have at least thirty training shots logged, this have to be from two different days. (so maximum fifteen shots logged pr. day)
No matter what you hunt, for each hunting year you must pay hunters tax.

Don McDowell
October 29, 2013, 03:27 PM
Oleson , your best bet would be to contact the state where you are intending to go, find out about hunting seasons, licenses etc, then if you can make it all come together start jumping thru the hoops to get your rifle and ammo over here and back.

Davek1977
October 29, 2013, 03:38 PM
Depends on what you want to hunt. Elk, probably have to draw a tag. Some (I'm thinking most) states don't have draws for mule deer or whitetail. Things change, though, and I've not hunted elsewhere, but Texas in 20 years. Change they do....I know for a fact that in SD and many other states, deer permits are by drawing only. If after the drawing there are leftover licenses, those are made available for purchase. In SD, that typically almost always means an "antlerless" deer tag, as buck tags are popular and are usually gone after the first round of the "lottery" drawing

Grumulkin
October 29, 2013, 03:59 PM
For hunting big game (roe deer and up) you must pass a shooters test each year. And to be able to take the shooters test, you must have at least thirty training shots logged, this have to be from two different days. (so maximum fifteen shots logged pr. day).

I'm curious. What does the shooters test consist of? Also, do you just attest to the fact that you have logged 30 training shots or does someone else also have to confirm you did the shooting?

Oleson
October 29, 2013, 04:13 PM
The logging is written down and stamped/signed by the club where you shoot. This paper must be taken with you and verified for the test. The test itself is a reindeer silhouett (of course) at 100 meters. On the target is a ring, 30 cm diameter, that can't be seen from the shooters place. (unless you have a reaaaaally good scope) 5 shots, all have to be within the circle. You can, for some stupid reason, try until you're broke. It costs about 20 $ pr. try, I think... I pay annual membership fee with everything included, competitions, training, test, so I don't remember exactly.

Grumulkin
October 29, 2013, 07:18 PM
Do you have to be in any particular shooting position when you shoot to get 5 shots in the 30 cm ring?

der Teufel
October 29, 2013, 08:10 PM
In Norway, you must have a hunters course. (jegerprÝven)
It consists of nine classes/evenings, one range day and a final exam.
The exam is fifty multiple choice questions, and you must have at least forty right.
For hunting big game (roe deer and up) you must pass a shooters test each year.
And to be able to take the shooters test, you must have at least thirty training shots logged, this have to be from two different days. (so maximum fifteen shots logged pr. day)
No matter what you hunt, for each hunting year you must pay hunters tax.

You may encounter a bureaucratic problem in that some states may stipulate that they will recognize hunter education courses from other states, but they might not have thought about other countries. I'd check in advance with the appropriate authorities and find out if what you have is acceptable.

I also agree that it would be much simpler if you could borrow a rifle here in the U.S.

Oleson
October 30, 2013, 04:33 AM
Do you have to be in any particular shooting position when you shoot to get 5 shots in the 30 cm ring?

Not really, but you can't use any support like rests, slings or similar. Most people shoot lying down. (prone?) Some people recognize that it is easier when sitting, and a few crazy ones stand up:p

Loyalist Dave
October 31, 2013, 10:28 AM
In Maryland you are required to have taken a hunter education course. You are not required to have taken an American hunter education course, so your Norwegian certification would work.

LD

Oleson
October 31, 2013, 01:48 PM
It's basically the same here. If you're a certified hunter in your country, you can hunt here.
That has pros and cons of course...

d2wing
November 1, 2013, 12:28 PM
I think your training certificate is valid in most states. Some states have small game lic for non residents for hunting birds, varmints, squirrels and rabbits. Some also have non resident big game lic over the counter for deer. Minnesota is one of those and we have plenty of Norske here as well. There are lots of public hunting areas.
There are also game farms for hunting Pheasants or other game birds. You can rent guns and even dogs. There is no license required, you pay a fee and are good to go.

Oleson
November 2, 2013, 02:18 PM
Minnesota sounds like a good place to visit in the future :)
And if my memory serves me right, it's loaded with people of norwegian ancestry as well.

d2wing
November 3, 2013, 12:24 AM
It sure is, my wife is Norwegian and some of her cousins from Norway have visited several times. They like shopping here.

Andrew Leigh
November 3, 2013, 01:47 AM
It almost sounds like foreign hunters are discrouraged from hunting in the US. Not because that was the intention but rather just because hunting is so well regulated that it becomes a barrier for foreigners.

Don't you have privately owned tracts of land in the US where the land owner controls the game population through commercial hunting?

Here is it common for land owners to establish a "hunting farm". It needs to be fully "game fenced" to stop migrant free ranging animals from entering. The farmer will allow the species to naturally breed and will control animal popultions through hunting which provides a revenue, apart from the accomodation etc.. The farmer is licensed and shooting may occur all year round as the stock belongs to the owner and not the citizens of the country. Few farmers allow for year round shooting as one does not want pregnant ewes and cows shot, in any event the animals need time to relax as they get very skittish toward the end of the season.

I would have thought that a system like or similar to this would be common in the US? In fact I would estimate that more hunting takes place on these farms than on government tracts of land. It makes hunting a really sustainable industry.

Pilot
November 3, 2013, 08:23 AM
It almost sounds like foreign hunters are discrouraged from hunting in the US. Not because that was the intention but rather just because hunting is so well regulated that it becomes a barrier for foreigners.

Well every state within the U.S. has a Game Commission or similar with different rules from other states, so you must start at that level. The only barrier I see after reading this thread would potentially be if states would recognize a foreign hunting license, or hunting course to get an "out of state" hunting license. Therefore an email or phone call to the specific state's game commission may be in order if it is not addressed on the commission's website.

bpl
November 3, 2013, 07:54 PM
Game animals in the US are generally "owned" by the citizens and regulated by state game commissions or in some cases federal regulations. Landowners do not own the game animals on their land and must abide by the state hunting regulations. Landowners can, however, charge people to hunt on their land. Most public land can be hunted on by anyone with a hunting license during the proper season. Some states have a lot of public land and others very little, so hunting access opportunities are very variable. Oleson's hunter education seems much more extensive than any US state hunter safety courses I've ever heard of, so I doubt he would have any problem obtaining a state hunting license. He probably should call or email the game commission of the state he is interested in hunting. Additionally, he should go online and explore the game commission website of the state he is interested in to familiarize himself with the license rules, necessary game tags, seasons and dates, sporting arms allowed (rifle, bow, shotgun, muzzleloader, etc.), proof of sex on some big game when quartered, caliber mimimums, etc. Some game animals such as deer can be hunted with a general license in most states, but some require entrance into a lottery drawing for a tag, which is not always assured. I'm sure that bringing a sporting rifle into the US for a hunting trip is possible as well, just would take more research to discover and comply with any regulations.

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