Gun Safes


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Tcar
October 30, 2013, 02:26 PM
Which ones do you have? (We are talking about larger than two weapon capacity safes).



Which one would you avoid?


Last, confessions, how many to you are taking a calculated risk and do not totally secure your weapons and/or ammo? What are you waiting for? Lottery or tax refund check? Confession is good for the soul.

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farm23
October 30, 2013, 05:10 PM
I am looking forward to this thread. At this time all my arms are locked in a metal cabinet but I want a regular safe.

bugsbunny45
October 31, 2013, 12:36 AM
Cannon 24 gun from Tractor Supply
love it

Glock Doctor
October 31, 2013, 07:03 AM
A gun safe ain't worth much if it doesn't have fire insulation and, at least, a minimal fire retardant rating. A metal cabinet ain't going to do very much good. Metal cabinets quickly turn into ovens when they get hot; and an experienced thief can get into one in a matter of minutes.

Rather than dicker over which safe is best I'll offer this advice: Always use a heated humidity control rod inside your safe; and, when you go out to buy a gun safe, no matter what size safe you think you need, get one that is one size larger! (Because if your experience is typical you're going to start using it for a lot more than just guns; AND, then, there's the wife. She's going to want to use it, too.)

I do secure my guns; and I do this: WHERE I SLEEP! Some people I know keep their gun safes in the basement or downstairs. Not me! I keep my guns where I sleep; AND when I swing the gun safe's door open it will shield most of my body from any gunfire that would be coming at me from outside the room.

I don't secure my ammunition; I've got way too much of it to do that. Instead I store ammunition in out-of-the-way places throughout the house. (A small amount here; and a small amount there.) The only other caveat: I very carefully researched gun safes, and talked to several safe manufacturers before I bought mine. Consequently I don't use an electronic digital door lock. 'Why'? Because several manufacturers identified electronic door locks as the number one reason for expensive in-home service calls.

I use a mechanical lock that - for speed and ease of operation - I'll place on the next to last digit just before I go to sleep at night. When I get up in the morning I simply spin the dial to lock everything up, again, nice 'n tight. As long as you buy an honest-to-goodness gun safe, and not a metal cabinet, you should be fine. Me? I've got a 24 gun Sentry Safe that my wife's, 'stuff' takes up about a third of the space in.

You should, also, make certain that you bolt down to either the wall or the floor any gun safe that you really want to impede others from getting into. The truth is that a thief who knows what he's doing can, with even basic handtools, get into a typical gun safe in about 30 minutes, or less. ('Super thieves' with acetylene torches and diamond cutting wheels are able to get in a lot faster!)

Outlaw Man
October 31, 2013, 08:38 AM
I have an upper end Amsec RSC.

I would always recommend buying the best you can afford, whatever that may be. However, to answer your question specifically, I'd avoid store brands and other branded RSCs (like Browning or Winchester) simply because you can usually get the exact same box for several hundred less by buying the original.

I don't normally leave mine unsecured. As much as I spent on my RSC, I'd be foolish not to use it as much as possible.

JerryND
October 31, 2013, 09:20 AM
Reed Custom! Saw mine at the MN State Fair. The thing that sold me was I can gain access to anyone of 21 long guns and 15 pistol/barrels without moving anything and still has room for my cameras. Has sliding trays. Fireproof. I think it's 1200 for 90 min Heavy, 1300 lbs. and solid. DON"T try to move it yourself. Don't know about availability though. It's a small company in Warroad MN.
www.reedcustom.com

farm23
October 31, 2013, 09:25 AM
I agree my metal cabinet is not a good choice and that is why I need a good gun safe. Glock Dr I had not thought about keeping the safe in our bedroom but your idea has a lot of merit. I am looking for a 60 gun safe and they are really heavy so it may have to some where beside the bedroom.

g_one
October 31, 2013, 10:12 AM
I don't own a safe yet, but it is literally the next thing on my list of purchases. I've been living with my fiance and her two teenage children for almost a year now, but they are very safe and educated regarding firearms - I don't feel like they're a risk at all. Plus, the neighborhood we live in is almost a 0 risk for break-ins here in rural Wisconsin. For me, a gun safe is more about having one centralized location to store them all in. The Stack-on 18 gun convertible locking cabinet is probably going to end up being my purchase.

Having said that, I do understand and agree that a gun safe is a very wise idea.

Teachu2
October 31, 2013, 04:19 PM
Summit Denali 60. About as good as a RSC gets.

Glock Doctor
October 31, 2013, 04:54 PM
I feel like my paranoia is showing! :D

Way back in 1990 we experienced a sudden, and completely unexpected, home invasion. As careful as I usually am I have to admit that the guy caught me, 'flatfooted' and completely unprepared. (I'd just been released from the hospital only the day before!) Thanks to our Pit Bulldogs we survived the experience; but the event changed me forever. We lived in a, 'very good' neighborhood and only 3 blocks from a large police station; but, still, we nevertheless found ourselves to be in a sudden, 'world of trouble'.

Keeping a loaded gun in the bedroom isn't enough. A gun has to be available to you wherever you are in the house; and, just like any other infiltration problem, you should never leave a loaded weapon (or other unresolved problem) behind you. When we retire for the night all of the guns in the house are in the bedroom with us; (but I no longer own 50 + guns). :) Because I know that, in any attack, time is always of the essence I positioned our gun safe in order to provide maximum, 'hard cover' protection for me the very moment that I jump out of bed.

My wife is trained to work the tac light and/or shout out any warning commands that might be necessary. Her job is to draw attention away from me and handle the cell phone as required. Me? I'm the dead-silent, obscure figure standing in the dark behind a heavy steel door. I know all of my available lines AND angles of fire; and I'm ready to use them if and as needed.

A 60 gun safe is one huge monster; and, yes, I've never seen one that wasn't set up on the ground floor; however, before I'd go with only one huge gun safe I think I'd settle for one 20 + gun safe in the bedroom; and another 40 + gun safe located somewhere else in the house. Home firearm storage and safety is about a whole lot more than simply owning a gun safe. Just like any firearm there is a right, a wrong, a better, and a worse way to use a gun safe to your complete home advantage.

Like my famous law enforcement Grandfather used to say, 'Only a fool would attempt to follow a bear into its own den.' A gun, a gun safe, a tactical light, a cell phone, and a trained and cooperative partner are ALL respective parts of a complete home and self defense picture. ;)

Teachu2
October 31, 2013, 09:29 PM
My 60cu.ft. RSC is located away from my bedroom, but I have a gun locker in the master bedroom closet with a Mossy 500 12ga and a M&P 15 Sport in it, along with my wife's M&P 9c. My EDC is within reach at bedtime, and on me the rest of the time. Approaches to the house have motion-sensitive floodlights, and I have two Labs outside that bark anytime someone approaches the property. Pretty good depth to my defenses.

HighExpert
October 31, 2013, 10:01 PM
I have a 24 gun Cannon and a 30 gun Fort Knox. I also agree on buying bigger than you think you will need as evidenced by the fact that I have two.

DM~
October 31, 2013, 10:19 PM
I feel like my paranoia is showing! :D
My wife is trained to work the tac light and/or shout out any warning commands that might be necessary. Her job is to draw attention away from me and handle the cell phone as required. Me? I'm the dead-silent, obscure figure standing in the dark behind a heavy steel door. I know all of my available lines AND angles of fire; and I'm ready to use them if and as needed.


There ya go, have the wife draw their fire, while you hide behind that steel safe! That should keep YOU alive, for sure! lol

DM

Glock Doctor
November 1, 2013, 06:49 AM
There ya go, have the wife draw their fire, while you hide behind that steel safe! That should keep YOU alive, for sure! lol

Yeah, glad you noticed and decided to make such a useful contribution to this thread. I know a lot of guys who'd do something like that to their wives; BUT, I'm definitely not one of them. The truth is that it's all in how you set things up.

One of the mistakes you make is that you have neither a prearranged PLAN, nor a mutually PRACTICED response for in the home self-defense. Another mistake is the ridiculous assumption that I'm married to a woman who doesn't know how to take care of herself.

In a CQB firefight there's nobody I'd rather, 'have my back' or take up a position across the room from me than the woman I married. (You must realize that I'm the one who taught her how to skillfully handle firearms as well as she does!)

This said: Everybody, 'hides' behind a gun; and this truism applies - I am certain - to you, too! Some do it better; and others do it worse. ;)

DM~
November 1, 2013, 09:24 AM
One of the mistakes you make is that you have neither a prearranged PLAN, nor a mutually PRACTICED response for in the home self-defense. Another mistake is the ridiculous assumption that I'm married to a woman who doesn't know how to take care of herself.


Now who's making assumptions???

DM

Glock Doctor
November 1, 2013, 09:41 AM
Come on, Sport! I know you're the king of internet gun forums. Why don't we both be nice and leave it at that, OK. You carefully plan and think out everything you say and do; (Which is always relevant and in good taste.) and I use my wife as bait. I think everybody's got it , now.

CB900F
November 1, 2013, 11:42 AM
Fella's;

I, of course, have Graffunders. What would I avoid? Anything that's not a true safe, but that's my personal decision that I pay the financial consequences of. I very much recognize that not everybody can afford a true safe, and anything is better than nothing, after all.

I was somewhat amused to see: "Metal cabinets quickly turn into ovens when they get hot; and an experienced thief can get into one in a matter of minutes." That's true, as far as it goes. But, I've seen RSC's that are a triumph of marketing over substance that a 12-year-old boy with motivation could pop in that same matter of minutes. Therefore, to paraphrase; We don't need no experienced thief 'round here!

:D 900F

nyresq
November 8, 2013, 03:09 PM
I bought my Graffunder from the man above me... The difference between what an RSC can offer and what a true rated safe can offer is astounding.

I always get a kick out of guys who think nothing of spending thousands of dollars on a high end scope and a custom made rifle, to then store it in a RSC they paid $1,200 for...

If you have a $1,000 collection of guns, then buy a cheap tin box. But if you have any substantial amount of money in guns that you really want to protect, move past the hype and marketing of RSC gun cabinets and look at a real safe made with plate steel and concrete.

I made the mistake of buying 2 RSC's before I got some education on safes and what the RSC rating is really worth (hint- not much). I bought a real safe, and while it cost more, I got more, far more for my money.

CB900F
November 8, 2013, 03:13 PM
Nyresq;

Thank you sir.

900F

rockhopper46038
November 8, 2013, 04:01 PM
I use an ISM CashVault to secure my firearms. It's more of a bank vault than a gun safe, but it serves my purposes. It's rather large and heavy.

AABEN
November 8, 2013, 04:16 PM
What about a Fat Boy safe. Yes it is a very large safe. It is the largest single door safe that I have every seen 40 plus guns. My safe will hold 24 with scopes.Plus 40 hand guns some in box's some on a rack. Yes it is fire safe. Wish I had a Fat Boy!

WRGADog
November 9, 2013, 06:13 PM
American Security BF6032

CB900F
November 9, 2013, 06:58 PM
AABEN;

See my post #17.

900F

loose noose
November 16, 2013, 08:55 PM
I've got one gun vault that is over 40 years old that holds about 35 long guns, and at least 20 pistols and revolvers I do believe it is an older Canon, with a Sergeants and Greenleaf combination lock. It is constructed of 1/4" steel with two vertical locking lugs, and 3 horizontal locking lugs I'm not sure if it is fire proof though.

I also have a 24 gun Canon fire proof safe with a digital combination lock that has a dry weight of 453 #s that has 3 horizontal locking lugs and 3 vertical lugs.

Neither of the gun vaults are secured to the floor or the walls, I figure if a thief can carry them out without a reefer dolly handy they can have 'em.

HOWARD J
November 16, 2013, 10:29 PM
My safe is about 30 years old---it was made by the Mfr that now makes Browning---with the guns it weighs sbout 800 #'s & is bolted back & down on concrete.
I have never been broken into maybe because of the monitored burgler alarm---so I have no idea how the safe would hold up
the metal is about 3/16" thick

forestdavegump
November 17, 2013, 11:44 AM
I never had a quote gun safe when growing up. We had a cabinet at the end of the hallway, you know the wood ones with a glass front. That being said times change. Since I moved out etc... A 100 years ago or so... It did NOT seem like a priority until around 1975. Paranoid not likely. PTSD doubt it. Young wife and two kids maybe...lol. The timing was a miracle. A month after we got it we had a break in. The jerks did not get any guns it worked.
The safe my father had he got from my grand fathers shop. Like I said we never had a quote gun safe. Back in the late 30s or 40s my father helped his dad move this monster to the basement and there it still lives no doubt. It took 6 men and a young boy to get it in there. I should know I was that boy. We took the coal/wood schute apart to get her down there. We stored guns and ammo in there along with jewelry and coins some stamps. Was it fire rated? Dunno.

Today. I used various safes and metal cabinets. Some are merely there to be seen. So a crook or junkie that were to break in would think they scored and quit looking. I am not one who likes to advertise with the giant Cabelas gun safe in the living room next to the 80 inch 3D TV. I own neither. I don't have a gun safe out in the open like furniture. We have some of the cheap metal cabinets in bedroom closets. They work great for ammo and knives and guns etc as the are out of plain sight. I know they are not fire proof. My plan is to not have a fire. We have alarms and fire extinguishers too. Crazy they are in all the rooms of the house. The biggest single safe I think we have probably only holds 40 or 50. We have had good luck with Liberty and Patriot. To that we have had good fortune with the Sentry and stack on safes and cabinets. What is better and what a guy can afford are to different things. MANY do skimp on the gun safe and gun safety and just plain old safety in general. Get the best you can afford. Get more than one. Those 80 gun safes weight a ton they are harder to hide when and if you move. Also when you bring it home from Dick's sporting goods your nosey rosies will be watching. The less others know and the less that it seen the better. Sometimes a pad lock on a gutted refrigerator or freezer is best. Stop think observe plan act. What is best for your neighbors might not be what is best for you. Shop around. Bigger is not always better. Even when size matters.

I6turbo
November 18, 2013, 12:12 PM
there ya go, have the wife draw their fire, while you hide behind that steel safe! That should keep you alive, for sure! Lol

dm
lol :D

armsmaster270
November 19, 2013, 03:54 AM
Pentagon Dual access Outside door 1"thick, ceramic plates, insulation

http://i239.photobucket.com/albums/ff207/armsmaster270/Family/SafeSharon.jpg (http://s239.photobucket.com/user/armsmaster270/media/Family/SafeSharon.jpg.html)

http://i239.photobucket.com/albums/ff207/armsmaster270/Guns/SafeHandguns.jpg (http://s239.photobucket.com/user/armsmaster270/media/Guns/SafeHandguns.jpg.html)

http://i239.photobucket.com/albums/ff207/armsmaster270/Guns/Safelongarms.jpg (http://s239.photobucket.com/user/armsmaster270/media/Guns/Safelongarms.jpg.html)

CB900F
November 19, 2013, 09:39 AM
Armsmaster270;

I'd suggest that you not keep ammunition in your container. If for whatever reason, the thermal protection capability is exceeded, and the ammo goes off the interior then becomes filled with a cloud of incandescent gas. How dense the cloud is depends on how much you had in there at the time. I've seen the results first hand, and it's not pretty.

900F

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