Does anyone else consider themselves strictly a meat hunter?


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Jason_W
November 7, 2013, 09:20 AM
I definitely am. When I hunt upland game birds, I try to shoot them on the ground whenever I can as I find I miss and wound fewer birds that way. When it comes to deer hunting (which is not a chore I enjoy at all), I could care less about antlers and buck maturity, and really just want venison in the freezer. In fact, if I ever had the option of choosing an antlerless only tag or a buck only tag, I would choose the antlerless tag knowing that it would give me a statistically much greater chance at scoring meat.

Obviously, I don't have anything against those who pursue only the most mature bucks with the biggest sets of antlers or those who pride themselves on being able to knock fast flying birds out of the air, but I have no interest in those pursuits. For me, it's all about enjoying time outside (except for deer hunting from a fixed position, that's just horrible :D) and eating delicious hormone and preservative free meat.

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Art Eatman
November 7, 2013, 10:24 AM
Never been "strictly" a trophy hunter or a meat hunter. I've killed some nice bucks after having done "an honest day's work" in the effort, but they were quite yummy-tasty.

And, for many years in Texas, it was bucks-only. Then, at long last, permits for one doe to 50 acres. Not a problem for me, but a 40-acre fella had to make do with horns.

Arkansas Paul
November 7, 2013, 10:28 AM
I'm with Art. I'm not strictly one or the other. Meat for the table is a huge part of it though. Considering the money spent on deer hunting I've got to bring something home to show for it or the wife would prolly kill me.

In Arkansas we're allowed six deer total, no more than two of which can be bucks. You can fill the tags as you please other than that (1 buck and 5 does, 2 bucks and 4 does or just 6 does).
Usually I'll kill a doe or two first, then I'll start letting them pass and wait on a buck. However, the bucks are eaten too, and they're just as tasty if you take care of the carcass correctly. Usually have more meat to take home too.

horsemen61
November 7, 2013, 10:29 AM
I go because I like to eat deer so yes I am a meat hunter

Outlaw Man
November 7, 2013, 10:30 AM
I'm pretty much that way. I'll go after a trophy on occasion, but I won't hardly hunt anything I won't eat other than varmints.

I may be one of the only hunters in Arkansas that won't duck hunt. I suppose I could give the meat away, but it's not really worth the trouble.

There's not a whole lot else I won't eat. I guess that's why I'm more interested in the meat than the trophy.

Captain Capsize
November 7, 2013, 10:35 AM
I identify with Jason. I love hunting and being in the woods but I enjoy eating the fruits of my pursuit even more. And I truly hate sitting in the woods waiting for that one deer in a thousand acres that might just happen to pass by me within 30 yds. When I go bow hunting for deer I usually leave my squirrel gun in the truck so when I get cold and tired of sitting I go back to the truck and get my rifle and walk the woods and HUNT!

MCgunner
November 7, 2013, 11:03 AM
I'm with Art, not strictly anything. I'll kill a meat deer without qualms when my freezer is empty. I'll take a big buck if he presents himself, but I ain't passing on a non-B&C buck. If I hunted only for B&C bucks, I'd never have killed a deer. :D I can't afford to be a trophy hunter. There aren't trophies around here and high fence hunting for high protein fed, genetically selected bred deer is expensive. Anyone can kill a trophy if he or she has 5-10 grand to do it with, at least in Texas. Small places where I own land, if you don't shoot it, the neighbor will. You need millions of dollars worth of land in this state to be picky and start your own management plan. Either that, or you can high fence 10 acres. No thanks. :rolleyes:

I kill/trap hogs mostly for the meat, though it's enjoyable and I have fun doing it. :D I NEVER ground swat birds! It ain't a proper kill unless it's shot on the wing. Ain't like it's illegal, I'm just out there for other reasons than meat when I'm bird hunting. I don't hunt birds for the meat. Oh, I eat 'em, but I just love the challenge of wing shooting and ducks and geese are REALLY in my blood, have been for nearly 50 years. It's about the experience, not the meat. As the Harley guys say, "If I have to explain it to you, you wouldn't understand." I love the whole experience of duck and goose hunting, especially duck hunting. Eating 'em is okay, I like 'em enough (prefer pork or venison), but the wife doesn't like ducks. She likes doves when I kabob 'em, though. I just make her something else when I grill my duck breasts. :D

brainwake
November 7, 2013, 11:18 AM
Meat hunter here....I sometimes hope I don't see a trophy...because that adds the expense of a mount...plus the meat isn't as good as the young doe. We like to fill freezer and hook up a few of my friends that are always appreciative of the meat. To us...deer meat is a delicacy. In fact...we just ran the dehydrator last night...so I will come home to 2 gallon size ziplocks of some award winning jerky! Now I will just have to fend off the kids!

Arkansas Paul
November 7, 2013, 12:03 PM
You need millions of dollars worth of land in this state to be picky and start your own management plan.

I keep telling the guys at our deer lease this. We've got 12-1300 acres and they're trying to get us to let the 13"-14" bucks walk. Well, if we do, the next deer lease over is going to shoot them. We simply don't have enough to manage bucks. Can't tell them that though.

wyohome
November 7, 2013, 12:05 PM
Meat mostly, although I will spend a day or two trying to chase down a good rack if I see one. The freezer gets empty, no one ever sees the antlers.

Muskyman
November 7, 2013, 12:55 PM
When it comes to deer I'm mostly interested in the meat. I love it, and only have a short window of time to get it.

I can definitely understand trophy hunting though. I spend many hours and a lot of money to catch muskies, just to snap a picture and let them go. I do fish for many other species of fish so I can eat them though.

I think the difference with deer is the short season. I usually only have 2 or maybe 3 weekends a year to put venison in the freezer, and I take what I can get (within reason). I can musky fish 6+ months a year, and catch fish to eat 12 months a year. I'm planning to get into bow hunting and muzzleloading to extend my season though. Then I will probably spend some time chasing big bucks...or maybe just buy another freezer. We'll see.

Eb1
November 7, 2013, 01:01 PM
If it is brown, it is down. I don't know what that makes me. It has to be legal, but I am not picky.

Resist Evil
November 7, 2013, 01:20 PM
Meat hunter here. Antelope for jerky and elk for sausage, hamburger, jerky, roasts, steaks, etc. I got tired of venison.

The only trophies I am interested in are wrapped in white paper sitting quietly in my freezer. :D

Comrade Mike
November 7, 2013, 01:36 PM
Purely a meat hunter, can't eat horns!

MCgunner
November 7, 2013, 02:17 PM
This is the best antlered deer I've seen since I've been here. I doubt I'll get him, never seen him in daylight on the camera or otherwise. There's a decent 8 point, spread about to the ear tips running around. Seen that one on camera in daylight, even 2:30 in the afternoon on one shot.

Anyway, now that I have meat, I'm hoping I see this guy. If not, no biggy. Seen a couple of spike and a 7 point just showed up. Does are illegal in gun season in this county without a permit which you cannot apply for unless you have 50 acres or more.

Neatest thing is I can hunt here any time I'm home and not working. I'm not limited on stand time. :D

3212
November 7, 2013, 03:47 PM
Its meat for me.I've shot 3 does for every buck and I shoot the first legal buck I see.They have to have 3 points on one side to be legal here.1 buck per year and multiple doe tags available.

Hometeached1
November 7, 2013, 05:30 PM
I guess I'm a meat hunter, I have a hard time seeing any deer so if I see one it's going down. I bring a .22 pistol when I'm hunting deer so I can get squirrel if I can.

DM~
November 7, 2013, 05:56 PM
I won't shoot a small buck, and the definition of a "small buck" around here is, a buck with 4 total points or less... If i want meat, i shoot does,

http://www.fototime.com/C8EA6F979F7FAAE/standard.jpg

I absolutely don't worry about "what class" an aminal is, and even though i've shot some decent bucks/bulls/bear over the years, i've never had one scored.

I have no use for that trap, of what an animal will "score", before i pull the trigger.

DM

okiewita40
November 8, 2013, 04:21 AM
Since both the wife and I were raised eating lot's of wild game I am a meat hunter.

Lloyd Smale
November 8, 2013, 07:02 AM
I consider myself a meat hunter but i still do like to occasionaly bring home a nice set of antlers. But my first priority when in the field is to bring home some back straps.

Sam1911
November 8, 2013, 07:05 AM
Yeah, when I do hunt it is strictly for meat. I've often wondered if I do end up with that "buck of a lifetime" in my sights, what I'll do with it. I can't imagine paying for a mount and keeping part of the carcass on the wall in the house (though that's what I grew up with -- most hunters did that back when I was a kid), so I suppose if I felt I had to keep it I'd saw off the top of the skull and nail it up somewhere in the barn. Maybe.

I was always told that medium sized does were the best eating, so that problem hasn't come up so far.

Officers'Wife
November 8, 2013, 07:14 AM
Around here it's either putting food on the table or pest control. If you want horns go through the woods where deer bed when they shed the things and you can pick up as many as you desire.

I would rather make jerky out of bucks rather than to try process out certain undesirable traits. (mainly toughness) Does seem to produce a superior table meat.

content
November 8, 2013, 07:23 AM
So far I am.

Have tried to call in the few yotes we have but have not bagged one.

Last year, for the first half of the season, I tried to track a 10 point to his day time spot, then passed on several good deer in the evening, hoping they would lure him out early.
Had to put in considerable time to get a good one the last half.

This year I put a 5 point and a doe in the freezer the first week.

So this may be trophy year. If not I am at least having more fun hunting then ever!

Patocazador
November 8, 2013, 10:51 AM
I've gone through the cycle. I killed my first deer at age 26, a small spike. I graduated to strictly trophy over the years and then tapered back to putting them in the freezer.

I've killed far more does than bucks over the years though. Lately, it's all public land hunting with bucks only so does are now a rarity for me.

inclinebench
November 8, 2013, 11:22 AM
I consider myself to be primarily a meat hunter. I will usually pass on a buck in favor of a doe, but every now and again, I see a buck that inspires me to shoot it; usually because it looks like it will never be a trophy, and I like to pick out the weak ones from the herd. However, I have shot a few bucks solely because they had awesome racks. Anything I shoot is eaten.

Arkansas Paul
November 8, 2013, 12:57 PM
I was always told that medium sized does were the best eating

I would agree with that.

I will usually pass on a buck in favor of a doe

I will if the buck is small. If its a basket rack 6-point that is a young deer, I'd rather shoot a doe. There's no sense to me in killing a young buck, IF you can take a doe any time you want. In our lease, you could kill a doe nearly any day you go out, so its easy for me. It would be stupid to kill a small buck that you couldn't brag about anyway. If you want meat, great. Kill a doe.
Now you folks that hunt in areas where you can't kill a doe, you have to do what you have to do to bring home the backstraps. Or if where you hunt isn't heavily populated I understand.

wyohome
November 8, 2013, 04:00 PM
Why is it stupid to kill a tasty young buck?

Arkansas Paul
November 8, 2013, 04:39 PM
Why is it stupid to kill a tasty young buck?

Please don't misunderstand me. I didn't mean it would be stupid to kill a young buck if that were your only choice.

I was saying where I hunt, it wouldn't be smart to kill one for a few reasons. 1) There are an abundance of does that could easily be killed 2) Taking a young buck out of the breeding pool isn't smart for deer management, especially when we are so overrun with does 3) The people I hunt with constantly complain that they're not seeing many bucks, thus it wouldn't be wise to shoot the young ones before they get a chance to mature

I realize that everyone is not in the same position as I am in regards to the legality and abundance of does in our herd. I would certainly never begrudge anyone for shooting a young buck if their area didn't allow the harvest of does or if deer in general were scarce.

Heck, I wouldn't begrudge them anyway as long as what they're shooting is legal. It just may not be the way I would do it.

HB
November 8, 2013, 04:58 PM
As far as deer go I will shoot about anything, especially during bow season. Im a broke college kid and from October through February my diet consistents mainly of deer meat and velveeta. I will let a young buck walk in favor of a doe but I am certainly happier when a 10 pt walks by.

I also kill a lot of birds. This is mostly for sport as there is nothing more exciting than calling a turkey in or seeing ducks fly to deeks. I can't imagine shooting them on the ground and I wouldn't hunt with somebody that did. There is something in the fair pursuit of game that makes the bounty taste that much better.

HB

Arkansas Paul
November 8, 2013, 05:10 PM
HB grind up what you can't steak out and get some Hamburger Helper. That's poor college kid fine dining right there. :)

Double_J
November 8, 2013, 06:33 PM
I don't hunt that often, but when I get the chance it is for meat. I did a lot of fishing when I was younger, and that was for meat, I never cared for catching a "trophy" fish. I figure a good photo of a "trophy" and a freezer full of meat is a better way to go. My father is the one who taught me that, and he grew up eating what was caught, hunted, and raised. He grew up in a very desolate small area and learned the value of living off the land so to speak. The land will provide if you are willing to work for it.

newfalguy101
November 8, 2013, 06:48 PM
I am a meat hunter, however, I wouldn't pass on a big ol bruiser if he strolled within range. I will have an either sex tag in my pocket opening morning with a "bonus" antlerless only tag............I am gonna pop the first legal deer I see. then with the meat in the freezer, I can wait for something bigger buck OR doe.

MCgunner
November 8, 2013, 11:13 PM
I won't shoot a small buck, and the definition of a "small buck" around here is, a buck with 4 total points or less... If i want meat, i shoot does,

That's okay if you can take does legally. In Colorado county, Texas, you can't during gun season. You can in Calhoun county, but I've never shot a doe on my place, there. Things are tiny, most of the one's I coulda shot. There was one nice sized doe, but I shot the nice 8 point that was chasing her. I have killed a few spike deer, a 6 point and a 5 point there just for the meat. If I didn't shoot it, the neighbor would. :D My 9 pointer last year was far from anything special, but he's the biggest I've shot there, but he wasn't more'n 3 years old. I got him after a neighbor spooked him and missed, ran right past my stand. LOL!

Location, laws, and the situation has a lot to do with it, I reckon. I have shot some big doe for meat in the past where it was legal. :D

As far as deer go I will shoot about anything, especially during bow season. Im a broke college kid and from October through February my diet consistents mainly of deer meat and velveeta. I will let a young buck walk in favor of a doe but I am certainly happier when a 10 pt walks by.

I also kill a lot of birds. This is mostly for sport as there is nothing more exciting than calling a turkey in or seeing ducks fly to deeks. I can't imagine shooting them on the ground and I wouldn't hunt with somebody that did. There is something in the fair pursuit of game that makes the bounty taste that much better.

HB

I agree with you on bird hunting, but I'm quite sure you don't flush your turkey before you shoot, right? :D

As for being a broke college student living off game, I have walked in your shoes many moons ago when tuition and fees were a LOT cheaper, but minimum wqge was a buck 60 an hour. You'll have stories to tell some day. :D

osprey176
November 9, 2013, 01:15 AM
I suppose I am a meat hunter too. But I kinda prefer meat that grows under nice antlers.I have taken my share of does and young bucks when I lived in Florida.But since I moved out west,the hunting seems much easier,and I can be choosy about what I shoot.Not saying I won't take a doe,but so far I've managed to bring home antlers each season.Seeing and holding the skulls help me relive the hunt, and that means a lot to me. At least as much as a good meal.

sixgunner455
November 9, 2013, 07:15 AM
I've never killed a buck. Deer are for the table. I would kill a buck, have a buck tag this year in fact, but I am just hoping to see one. :D Elk are table fare as well - I hunt for time afield, and for food.

Birds are not rewarding to shoot on the ground, and I hunt with a dog, so they are not safe to shoot on the ground. I shoot them flying. I eat what I shoot, but I primarily hunt birds for the dog work time.

Jason_W
November 9, 2013, 08:14 AM
I can't imagine shooting them on the ground and I wouldn't hunt with somebody that did.

I'm guessing you've never hunted northeastern grouse:D

Even I probably wouldn't shoot stationary waterfowl unless my survival depended on the meat. That's a pretty big taboo in hunting culture, even if it does defy logic to a certain degree.

For upland game, however, I've found that I've never wounded and lost a bird I've shot off the ground or out of a tree. There's nothing worse than seeing a shower of feathers rain down after the shot and then not being able to find the bird.

ejfalvo
November 9, 2013, 08:18 AM
I wanted to hunt vegetables but they are all in DC and I live in NC.

Jason_W
November 9, 2013, 08:23 AM
I was saying where I hunt, it wouldn't be smart to kill one for a few reasons. 1) There are an abundance of does that could easily be killed 2) Taking a young buck out of the breeding pool isn't smart for deer management, especially when we are so overrun with does 3) The people I hunt with constantly complain that they're not seeing many bucks, thus it wouldn't be wise to shoot the young ones before they get a chance to mature

I wish our deer situation was like that. I would happily spend the first few days of each deer season harvesting an unaware doe or two and then focus on other forms of outdoor recreation.

I'm thinking about getting into bow or crossbow hunting for the sole reason of being able to access the high deer populations that cling to Maine's coastal zones. These areas usually just a little too developed for firearm hunting.

The catch is, in my wildlife management zone, even though thick herds of dear maraud neighborhoods along the coast, only 125 or so doe permits were issued by lottery drawing this year. I could be in a situation where I'm all set up with a nice new bow and cushy ground blind, and see doe after doe that I can't shoot. That would be frustrating.

Gunnerboy
November 9, 2013, 09:46 AM
I hunt the ever illusive blacktail.... so im a meat hunter as long as its a fat yearling buck ill shoot it dont matter how big the antlers are to me, we dont really have doe tags around here unless you get drawn for a special permit to hunt them

ridgerunner1965
November 9, 2013, 09:10 PM
a guess im both a meat and a trophy hunter.we have lots of does here so will shoot them for the freezer. if i see a small buck with a nice rack, that looks like he has potentiol to grow into a real trophy, ill let him walk. if i see a small buck with a messed up skinny rack ill shoot him. if i see a large buck with braggin size horns ill shoot him too.


i know a lot of guys say you have to have a 1000's of acres to actually be able to manage deer for horn size. but it doesnt seem to be the case here on my 3 to 400 acre farm.

my basic plan is to cut down the doe population for better buck to doe ratio.this causes more activity during the rut since there is more competition for does. and the second part of the plan is to remove smaller bucks with obvious bad genetics.


so far after 10 years of this im seeing more and bigger bucks.and still plenty of does.

jack44
November 9, 2013, 09:54 PM
I never was into HORNS.

bigdogpete
November 9, 2013, 10:13 PM
Can't eat antlers. Meat eater here. Yes, antlers...

wankerjake
November 9, 2013, 10:17 PM
I love a good set of antlers and would opt for a larger buck/bull given the choice but I like elk burgers and deer breakfast sausage too much to hold out for long. I I'm primarily a meat hunter, and can kill only one deer and one elk per calendar year, if I am drawn and can find legal game. The meat is more important than the antlers to me.

Lennyjoe
November 9, 2013, 10:49 PM
Meat

Dthunter
November 10, 2013, 02:58 PM
I hunt only non fenced country here in Alberta. I have hunted for that big buck since I was a young man! I would shoot the occasional doe for meat, but always pushed for that big buck. It was a goal I really wanted to accomplish.
When I finally did, it was tremendously satisfying! He was still tastey as well. Now, I dont spend the time hunting like that anymore. Now I will shoot what ever my mood and liscence allows me. As long as we enjoy hunting, thats all that matters!

Hope you like the pictures

http://i1287.photobucket.com/albums/a629/darcytyndall1/image_zps2541f95d.jpg (http://s1287.photobucket.com/user/darcytyndall1/media/image_zps2541f95d.jpg.html)

http://i1287.photobucket.com/albums/a629/darcytyndall1/image_zps863a2917.jpg (http://s1287.photobucket.com/user/darcytyndall1/media/image_zps863a2917.jpg.html)

Texan Scott
November 10, 2013, 11:33 PM
Never kept an antler, tusk, hide, skull, tooth, foot, tail, etc in my life. I have no use for dead animal bits lying around the house. And... call me silly, but the idea of having a dead animal's head (with glass marbles stuffed in it where its eyeballs used to be) hanging on my living room wall to stare at me forever and ever without blinking while I read the evening paper is actually a bit creepy.

Meat is SO tasty, though. I like meat. Meat is good.

From The Silence of the Lambs:

H: Tell me... why do you think he removes their skins, Agent Starling? Thrill me with your accumen.

C: It excites him. Most serial killers keep some kind of trophies from their victims.

H: I didn't.

C: No... no, you ate yours.

MCgunner
November 10, 2013, 11:45 PM
I've got a decent, didn't say B&C, 8 point mounted that I shot out in Pumpville....that's in west Texas 13 miles west of Langtry. Also have a Javelina mounted that I shot out there and a mallard I shot on the Guadalupe delta. Yeah, I enjoy them even still. I ate the deer and even the stink pig, but not the duck.

Now, I misplaced the 9 point rack I shot last year. I was going to use 'em for tattlin' horns, oh, well.

1911 guy
November 11, 2013, 12:18 AM
Meat. I won't pass up on a "trophy" if it falls into my lap, but I will kill anything that will provide enough meat to justify the kill and the effort. If given the opportunity between two deer, I'll take the larger one because there's more meat on it.

As far as shooting upland birds on the ground or in trees, I'm O.K. either way. If I'm hunting with someone who feels it is somehow unethical to shoot a bird not in flight, I'll respect that. I'll also never shoot a bird on the ground when hunting with dogs. Too much risk for the dogs. Same reason I'd never let a rookie hunt rabbits over dogs. I've seen several dogs "peppered" and one killed. A few tag-alongs to see the method before you take shots at rabbits pursued hotly by beagles.

a-sheepdog
November 15, 2013, 07:27 PM
Yes, I am not looking for trophies, though I would be happy if one presented itself. I mainly hunt to stock up the freezer for the next year.

M1GarandDeerHunter
November 15, 2013, 07:54 PM
Meat hunter. Was a subsistance hunter for a number of years, bucks and does, geese and ducks, rabbits and squirrels, grouse etc. Like Art I wont pass on a trophy though. But its more chance than design. Unless you have decent land size you can control, kiss off most trophy hunting here on public land. lots of nice bucks on private land. Once pressured on public lands they flee to where the hunters AIN'T :) Most land owners however will open up to letting you hunt small game, especially bunnies and geese, or turkeys.

ZeroJunk
November 15, 2013, 08:25 PM
Quail and pheasant are good to eat. Mallard is pretty good, smaller ducks not so much. Squirrel and rabbit make the best gravy on the planet. But, if you think deer are good to eat you are just convincing yourself of that because you shot it. I get it all ground up and add enough beef or pork fat to give it some flavor and make it stick together. Good for spaghetti and meatloaf sort of thing. I use it but certainly would never seek it out because I wanted something to eat. You raise hogs, chickens, and cattle for that.

hipoint
November 15, 2013, 08:25 PM
Like Officers Wife, it's mostly about pest control here with the added benefit of getting meat. The wardens asked that we only remove Doe unless we catch a buck eating our profits. That was the purpose of my deer meat thread, we're overrun with it... Not a bad problem to have, except for the whole decimating of our farm thing.

I allow hunters to come here during season and try to stay out of their way and not ruin their hunting.

We live in an area where there are lots of artists so no one else allows hunting in an area that I would guess is about 5 thousand to 10 thousand acres so there is a pretty fair amount of them running around. Our little 30 acre island is the only area that they get shot. Dang things still won't learn to stay away though haha

MCgunner
November 15, 2013, 10:33 PM
I use it but certainly would never seek it out because I wanted something to eat. You raise hogs, chickens, and cattle for that.

:what:Some folks just don't know what's good, I guess, or good for you. :rolleyes: Good lean ground venison is the best chili meat there is. And, I'd NEVER GRIND BACKSTRAP!!!!! I rather like my crock potted rump and round roasts, too. I'll sometimes jerk venison and I'll add pork fat for sausage, but I have plenty of wild hog sausage right now, so I used the ground on the spike buck I shot the other day for chili meat.

You can keep your fatty old beef hamburger....:neener:

1911 guy
November 16, 2013, 01:50 AM
I take it that ZeroJunk has never had venison prepared well. Tastes very good. Like any animal, some cuts are better than others, but especially the tenderloin, AKA "backstrap", is a prime cut. Butterfly it, stuff with a little cheese, onions and mushrooms, then slow cook in a crock or well sealed roaster. That's good stuff, Maynard!

Officers'Wife
November 16, 2013, 08:32 AM
Quail and pheasant are good to eat. Mallard is pretty good, smaller ducks not so much. Squirrel and rabbit make the best gravy on the planet. But, if you think deer are good to eat you are just convincing yourself of that because you shot it. I get it all ground up and add enough beef or pork fat to give it some flavor and make it stick together. Good for spaghetti and meatloaf sort of thing. I use it but certainly would never seek it out because I wanted something to eat. You raise hogs, chickens, and cattle for that.
Hi Zerojunk,

You have never had molasses cured venison ham or you wouldn't say that. I won't even go into the health benefits of venison vs. pork. Venison takes more skill to prepare than the average McDonald's fry cook is capable of but that doesn't mean it isn't a tasty meal for someone that knows how to cook.

Davek1977
November 16, 2013, 08:53 AM
Nope, I'm not a meat hunter. I enjoy the meat, but I hunt because I love to hunt, not because I want or need the meat. In fact, I've started donating about one deer a year to sportsmen against hunger, which pays for the processing and distributes venison to needy families throughout the state. If I can partake of my favorite passion, and put food in someone's stomach who might not otherwise eat, I can't see the downside. If I had to pay access fees and high license fees, I may feel otherwise, but I hunt on the family ranch exclusively, and can get a 3 tag license for about $40.

wyohome
November 16, 2013, 12:10 PM
especially the tenderloin, AKA "backstrap", is a prime cut.
Backstraps and tenderloins are not the same thing. Backstraps are the large muscle that is along the spine on the outside of the ribcage, tenderloins are inside the ribcage.

wankerjake
November 16, 2013, 12:36 PM
Zerojunk, that is CRAZYtalk!

I've had a few really gamey muleys though I admit. It was gaminess, not rot. Still more than edible though, but I like the way they taste. Whitetails and elk have been consistently delicious, I much prefer it to beef and pork and chicken from the store which is why I put in for antlerless elk hunts and shoot small bucks. I eat game 6 days a week consistently.

Once I get property though, I do believe I'll raise a few lambs and try to draw bull tags, and hold out for larger bucks. I'll gladly eat lamb in between elk years. My trophy hunting days are ahead of me yet though.

newfalguy101
November 16, 2013, 12:48 PM
Turns out, I am more of a "get up early and bundle up to watch deer and throw bullets in their general direction to watch em run" kinda guy...................yea, I missed a PAIR of easy "chip shots" this morning............broadside 50ish yards

ZeroJunk
November 16, 2013, 01:06 PM
I figured that might stir something up. But, I really don't care for venison. I can eat it and eat a lot of it although it's ground up. But, as far as putting a piece on the grill, frying, or baking, ya'll can have it. If you put enough other stuff on it you can make it edible where as a good piece of pork, chicken, or beef doesn't need anything.

hipoint
November 16, 2013, 02:06 PM
I understand where zerojunk is coming from, maybe for other reasons than his but I kinda feel the same way. If it were legal, I'd take out an ad in the paper and trade my venison for beef haha. Beef is a real treat for us, we're just starting out as young farmers and invest all our money in to the farm. Buying beef at the store just isn't happening right now, makes me sad to walk past all those yummy steaks... But, the Lord provides for us just fine and even though our deer are a problem for the farm, they're a blessing for us since we have plenty of meat. We eat storebought sausages since I haven't figured out a good sausage recipe yet and storebought chicken since the raccoons ate all of ours, but red meat and fish all come off of our land and we eat that almost exclusively.

I like venison, but I prefer a nice bone in chuck roast grilled for a couple of hours :D

wyohome
November 16, 2013, 04:49 PM
There is a reason that deer have not been large-scale domesticated and raised...beef is hard to beat.

wankerjake
November 16, 2013, 05:07 PM
It depends on the beef but I agree, great beef is basically unbeatable. A lot of it sucks though. Plus it's ZERO fun to go get!

I prefer lamb to beef generally. It has the fat marbling, but a little extra flavor closer to deer.

Good pork is also outstanding.

Chicken does not belong in the same conversation as red meat, in my opinon.

MCgunner
November 16, 2013, 08:59 PM
Backstraps and tenderloins are not the same thing. Backstraps are the large muscle that is along the spine on the outside of the ribcage, tenderloins are inside the ribcage.

^Yup, what he said^

I figured that might stir something up. But, I really don't care for venison. I can eat it and eat a lot of it although it's ground up. But, as far as putting a piece on the grill, frying, or baking, ya'll can have it. If you put enough other stuff on it you can make it edible where as a good piece of pork, chicken, or beef doesn't need anything.

Now, I'm not one to turn down a good T bone, mind you, but the difference in beef and venison, aside from marbling, (can be a bad thing for cooking as well as health) is that the beef is prepared for you, aged and butchered for you by unknown minions. You never see the process, but it's done. I doubt you'd like beef from a grass fed cow if butchered the wrong way without bleeding/aging. Me, I prefer to do it myself, take pride in my non-gamey venison. Yeah, it's more work and requires knowledge only gained through experience, but it's worth the effort to me to have healthy, delicious meat in the freezer. Besides, if I shoot it, I eat it, unless it's a coyote or something.

Edit the post, but I also prefer ground venison to fatty hamburger meat for chili. Even coarse ground for chili meat, beef is too fat. Ever fry a burger and watch it shrink by 1/2? The good lean burger is NOT cheap. :D But, it's fine, I just prefer venison chili.

But, yeah, I like quality beef T bones. :D I ain't that broke that I can't spring for 'em now and then, either, but I ain't dissin' my venison. :D Beef does grill better, more fat, but I like grilling wild pork, too. Wild pork is more fatty than venison, though it's lean compared to farm pigs. I still prefer to crock pot a venison roast to pork, though, less fat in it and it falls right off the bone. Sometimes, pork turns to mush in the crock pot.

Arkansas Paul
November 16, 2013, 09:32 PM
If I didn't like the way deer tasted, trust me, I wouldn't spend 10x what beef costs (taking in everything that goes into deer hunting) and then get up at dark thirty on top of that to get it.

I understand that it is not for everyone though. I love it if prepared correctly, but if its overcooked it is worthless. The lack of fat makes it inedible if overcooked.

joeschmoe
November 16, 2013, 10:06 PM
I have no interest in hunting animals I can't eat. I have no opinion on those that do. Just for me I see no purpose in shooting coyotes or cats since I have no desire to eat them.

hipoint
November 16, 2013, 10:33 PM
^Yup, what he said^



Now, I'm not one to turn down a good T bone, mind you, but the difference in beef and venison, aside from marbling, (can be a bad thing for cooking as well as health) is that the beef is prepared for you, aged and butchered for you by unknown minions. You never see the process, but it's done. I doubt you'd like beef from a grass fed cow if butchered the wrong way without bleeding/aging. Me, I prefer to do it myself, take pride in my non-gamey venison. Yeah, it's more work and requires knowledge only gained through experience, but it's worth the effort to me to have healthy, delicious meat in the freezer. Besides, if I shoot it, I eat it, unless it's a coyote or something.

Edit the post, but I also prefer ground venison to fatty hamburger meat for chili. Even coarse ground for chili meat, beef is too fat. Ever fry a burger and watch it shrink by 1/2? The good lean burger is NOT cheap. :D But, it's fine, I just prefer venison chili.

But, yeah, I like quality beef T bones. :D I ain't that broke that I can't spring for 'em now and then, either, but I ain't dissin' my venison. :D Beef does grill better, more fat, but I like grilling wild pork, too. Wild pork is more fatty than venison, though it's lean compared to farm pigs. I still prefer to crock pot a venison roast to pork, though, less fat in it and it falls right off the bone. Sometimes, pork turns to mush in the crock pot.
Good point! When I eat other folks venison, the gamey taste puts me off. Over the last few years I've gotten much better at handling them. Without having a walk-in to hang them in (yet) I made a really nice meat washer out of 2 rubbermaid tubs. drilled holes in one, put the meat in it, set it in the second one with some water bottles to keep them well seperated and a drain hose in the outer tub. I'll leave it like that for a few days and run bags of ice through to wash/age the meat. Does a pretty good job too. You gotta mix it up some about half-way through but boy oh boy it does make a difference from when I just put 'em right in the freezer.

HOWARD J
November 16, 2013, 11:04 PM
I was up there for over 36 hunting seasons---the only vacation I took during the year.
I went up there to relax--I even took a camera with me & shot a lot more deer with it than with my rifle. My oldest & myself always took some meat home--the rest of the family did not like eating deer. I gave most of my deer every year to the meat hunters I was camping with. They are all gone now & I miss them
I enjoyed getting away from the office a lot more than deer hunting but I did take 22 deer during that time.
My legs are too bad to go anymore & the kids are all busy at work & do not hunt anymore.
Enjoy yourself & good hunting
HJ

ZeroJunk
November 16, 2013, 11:05 PM
I doubt you'd like beef from a grass fed cow

That's pretty much what I grew up on. We would feed them corn for a few weeks before we killed them but never took them off the grass. I never saw the big deal other than that the fat was a little yellow.

MCgunner
November 17, 2013, 08:26 PM
Good point! When I eat other folks venison, the gamey taste puts me off. Over the last few years I've gotten much better at handling them. Without having a walk-in to hang them in (yet) I made a really nice meat washer out of 2 rubbermaid tubs. drilled holes in one, put the meat in it, set it in the second one with some water bottles to keep them well seperated and a drain hose in the outer tub. I'll leave it like that for a few days and run bags of ice through to wash/age the meat. Does a pretty good job too. You gotta mix it up some about half-way through but boy oh boy it does make a difference from when I just put 'em right in the freezer.

I simply "age" mine on ice in a 120 quart cooler for 3 to four days for a big buck, as little as over night for a young deer (venison veal if you will). I change the water out daily during the process. I've not had a gamey deer in 25 years since I learned to do this.

Resist Evil
November 17, 2013, 08:40 PM
I simply "age" mine on ice in a 120 quart cooler for 3 to four days for a big buck, as little as over night for a young deer (venison veal if you will). I change the water out daily during the process. I've not had a gamey deer in 25 years since I learned to do this.
Thank you for posting that method. Ageing has been mentioned, but the clarity of your post made it click in my head.

oneounceload
November 17, 2013, 09:33 PM
Shooting birds on the ground is unethical, and in many locales, illegal. Pheasants aren't hard to hit, but like big game hunting, you DO need to practice beforehand

wyohome
November 17, 2013, 10:41 PM
Shooting birds on the ground is unethical, and in many locales, illegal.
If I have learned anything on THR, it is that ethics are regional. Baiting deer comes to mind. Talk about fish in a barrel. A running rooster is a harder target than a deer buried to its ears in a bucket of corn.

MCgunner
November 17, 2013, 11:26 PM
Shooting birds on the ground is unethical, and in many locales, illegal. Pheasants aren't hard to hit, but like big game hunting, you DO need to practice beforehand

Well, beyond that, it's just no fun, no challenge to ground swat a dove, let's say. Any idiot can shoot a dove off a wire, out of a tree, or off the ground. Dove ain't THAT easy to hit on the wing and THAT is the point of hunting them! It ain't about the two bites of meat on the breasts for your shotgun shell. :rolleyes: I hunt birds for the FUN. If you hit one with every shot, it'd still cost you probably 10 bucks a pound. :rolleyes: For that matter, I HUNT for the fun. :D The meat is a bonus. I have grocery stores within 20 miles of me in either direction and I have a decent income in my now semi retirement, not 6 figures, but well up into 5. I just like to hunt. :D I don't really trophy hunt, though, but I'll take one if it gives me a shot! And, I do like venison. :D

Hey, ain't many of us like old Caribou down here in the lower 48. What I kill supplements my meat stores, keeps me from having to buy a lot of meat, but I don't starve if I don't shoot something. I have chickens, too. Now, that's mainly because my wife likes 'em. With all the money I've spent building a pen/hutch, buying scratch and worm treats for the wife to feed her pets, those damned eggs probably cost me 50 bucks a dozen. :rolleyes: Funny thing, too, we don't eat that many eggs. 3 hens and we wind up giving away eggs to neighbors and relatives and putting one every morning on the dog's gravy train. She loves 'em. :D But, I guess they're kinda cool and I wouldn't be buying those expensive worm treats if it weren't for the wife. :rolleyes: Heck, I'm even thinkin' of getting an incubator to raise some chickens for slaughter. That's kinda stupid, too, since chicken is the CHEAPEST meat in the store...:rolleyes:

Oh, well, I love the rural life. :D I grew up with chickens and hunting in the woods, same kind of woods, oaks, though there were more live oaks there, mostly post oaks here. Still, beats the heck out of living in Port Lavaca or Corpus. I've dreamed of this for a while. Hunting is just part of it.

Now, far as hunting for meat goes, mostly, that's why I trap pigs. BUT, even THAT I find enjoyable. :D That's the one thing that's cheap. Deer hunting is cheap for me, too, since I do it behind the house on my own land. Corn for feeders and baiting the trap are my only expenses and my buddy who farms up north of Waco always gives me a bunch when I make my annual dove hunting pilgrimage up there. One good thing, price of corn is coming down, 7 bucks a 50 pound bag, now. I don't really use THAT much, so deer and hogs are cheap meat. STILL, it's more for the fun than the meat that I do it. I just enjoy hunting and fishing! So sue me! :D Heck, I've been doing it a long, long time. It's not something I'm about to give up anytime soon.

Jason_W
November 19, 2013, 08:04 AM
Shooting birds on the ground is unethical

So, you only shoot at running deer?

Like I said, I'm out there to enjoy the outdoors and hopefully bring in some meat. Not show everyone how great I am at shooting down flying objects.

Jason_W
November 19, 2013, 08:13 AM
If I have learned anything on THR, it is that ethics are regional. Baiting deer comes to mind. Talk about fish in a barrel

If baiting is legal and approved by state wildlife biologists, why not? Granted, it's not hunting in the same way that tracking an animal for miles is hunting, but it is harvesting free range meat, and there is value in that in and of itself.

Some people hunt for the challenge. they want to prove that they are capable of outwitting a game animal on its own turf. That's great. Others, really just want wild meat in the freezer and are hunting for the fulfillment that comes with obtaining food directly, without any middle men involved. That's great too.

Among hunters and anglers, there is an irritating subset of people who label as unethical any hunting or fishing method they view as easier or "less holy" than their own preferred method. Some fly fishermen look down their noses at anyone who takes to the water with a spinning setup, and some bow hunters dismiss firearms hunters with disgust. Such elitists aren't doing anything good for the future of hunting and angling.

Loyalist Dave
November 19, 2013, 09:27 AM
Jason points out a true problem. Folks who say "that's not hunting" when it differs from their aesthetics, even when you point out staking out a cornfield, climbing a tree, or putting down salt or staking out the salt spring are documented back to the flintlock era to hunters who didn't have the choice, if they wanted meat they shot it.

I am not a "meat" hunter, nor am I a "trophy" hunter. I shoot what comes in front of me. A mature fat doe, or a mature buck, doesn't matter. Usually this is a mature doe. I have passed on a large, mature buck with a nice rack, because he kept his numerous ladies in the area that I hunt, so he increased my chances at venison of one sex or the other. I took a nice four point trying to sneak into the mature buck's "harem" one morning, so leaving the big buck be was advantageous to my hunting.

LD

rromeo
November 19, 2013, 11:55 AM
I hunt deer because they are delicious. I'd shoot a 140lb doe before I shot a 140lb buck.
I'm not going to pay $500 to get a deer head mounted, but I might do an antler mount if he is something special.

MCgunner
November 19, 2013, 12:35 PM
So, you only shoot at running deer?

Like I said, I'm out there to enjoy the outdoors and hopefully bring in some meat. Not show everyone how great I am at shooting down flying objects.

Apples and oranges, though I have shot running deer. Most sportsmen hunt birds for sport. If you wanna eat quail, you can buy quail, pen raised. SHOOTING quail is done on the wing after the point from a good dog.

That said, I don't consider ground swatting a bird "unelthical" if it's legal where you are, just kinda stupid and a waste of a shotgun shell. I ain't out to impress you with my wing shooting skills, I ain't even out to impress myself. I'm out there for the fun of it. It's just more fun to wing shoot and it gives my dog a decent retrieve to boot. The bird hunting meat hunter would probably shoot and eat the dog...:rolleyes: I mean, if it's MEAT you want, there's more meat on the dog, right?

And, BTW, I have a nice mallard on the wall I had mounted in 1988. I didn't eat that one. I'd still like to mount a good bull sprig next one I shoot. I killed a cinnamon teal once and froze it to have it mounted, but never got the money up to do it. :rolleyes: Only cinnamon teal I've ever shot. It was pretty. Duck hunting is about the experience, the deeks, the calling, as much as it is the shooting. I enjoy all aspects of duck hunting. It ain't about the meat. The meat ain't all that good on a duck anyway. I've acquired a taste for it, but the wife won't eat 'em.

Jason_W
November 19, 2013, 03:38 PM
My primary ethic beyond hunting safely is to never shoot something I don't like to eat, excepting cases of pest control. I'll never take another shot at a woodcock or gray squirrel for this reason. I could really care less about method of take as long as it's safe and legal.

MCgunner
November 19, 2013, 09:09 PM
My primary ethic beyond hunting safely is to never shoot something I don't like to eat, excepting cases of pest control. I'll never take another shot at a woodcock or gray squirrel for this reason.

:what:

Squirrel is delicious! I never ate woodcock, but should be light meat, I'd think.

Jason_W
November 19, 2013, 09:16 PM
Woodcock are worm eaters. They taste like strong liver. Not my thing.

WayBeau
November 19, 2013, 09:29 PM
I am this year. The wife has given me the green light to fill the coffin freezer (the freezer in our basement that I could my 6'4" self inside of). That doesn't mean I won't shoot a buck should the opportunity present itself. I'm also thinking of trying to do something with the hides.

Any suggestions?

MCgunner
November 19, 2013, 09:33 PM
Woodcock are worm eaters. They taste like strong liver. Not my thing.

You probably don't like waterfowl, either, right? It has that liver taste, not worms that cause it, the dark meat. There are ways I like it, though.

LT.Diver
November 19, 2013, 09:33 PM
Yep.

WayBeau
November 19, 2013, 09:34 PM
The meat ain't all that good on a duck anyway.

I respectfully disagree. I LOVE wild duck. Cooked properly, it can be out of this world good. A nice fat Canvasback is some of the best eating on the planet, problem is getting one to slow down long enough to shoot it. Those suckers are quick.

Jason_W
November 19, 2013, 09:47 PM
You probably don't like waterfowl, either, right? It has that liver taste, not worms that cause it, the dark meat. There are ways I like it, though.

I've never had the opportunity to try wild waterfowl. I know I like ruffed grouse, snowshoe hare, and venison. The available game species here in NNE is pretty limited.

We have ducks and geese, of course, but I haven't had a chance to try hunting them as getting set up looks like it could get expensive in a hurry.

On the subject of dark meat, I saw a TV show once that documented people hunting puffins in Iceland. That was some of the darkest meat I've seen. It was purplish-black in color. I can only imagine how strong that stuff was.

swampcrawler
November 19, 2013, 10:01 PM
I've killed 16 deer so far. Only 4 were bucks. I shoot the first legal meat excepting does with spotted fawns.

I also love to shoot me some under 100 lb hogs. And squirrels. And best of all.. rabbits. Yum.

ultratec1
November 20, 2013, 01:05 AM
Meat hunter.....yes

Trophy hunter.....yes.


In Iowa you are allowed to buy as many antlerless tags for the county you live as long as the quota is not filled in that county. I will shoot 2-3 does a year to fill the freezer and hold off on the anysex tag for the buck that I want.

VTGD7940
November 20, 2013, 11:11 AM
I go either or. I mean, my main priority in hunting is meat. I like deer meat (and squirrel, rabbit, quail, etc.). It's free, and doesn't have any of the extra stuff (preservatives, colors, hormones, antibiotics) that meat found at the grocery store seems to carry. However, if a nice buck comes my way, I won't pass it up. This being said, I've yet to actually kill a deer (this season will change that), but just in terms of mindset relating to hunting, I'm more about the meat.

Loyalist Dave
November 20, 2013, 01:17 PM
My primary ethic beyond hunting safely is to never shoot something I don't like to eat, excepting cases of pest control. I'll never take another shot at a woodcock or gray squirrel for this reason.

I respect that, and follow that as well.., which is why I will shoot the gray squirrels and the woodcock..., yum yum yummy!

LD

Arkansas Paul
November 20, 2013, 02:26 PM
If I have learned anything on THR, it is that ethics are regional. Baiting deer comes to mind. Talk about fish in a barrel. A running rooster is a harder target than a deer buried to its ears in a bucket of corn.

On the contrary, if an animal has its ears in my corn pile, it is standing still, thus increasing my chances of putting a quick kill shot on it. Seems like the quicker the kill, the more ethical to me. But hey, don't let me stand in the way of your chest thumping macho self image. I'm sure you only shoot deer that are armed at least as well as you are. You know, so its ethical and all.

rromeo
November 20, 2013, 05:44 PM
I agree. I don't bait deer, but I don't think it makes me a better hunter. It's illegal to shoot over bait here, but feed plots are legal and I won't chase a deer away from the pear tree just to make an ethical shot.
From what I think I know, some states require bait for bear hunting because they don't want bad shots and a wounded bear running around.
Is it unethical to use rattle antlers or other calls to lure a buck in?

Don't call me a wise old sage. I have exactly one deer kill to my name, and it was a doe that was standing in the middle of the trail as I was on my way to the blind. No bait, no calls, just a guy and a gun.

Jason_W
November 20, 2013, 06:10 PM
A reasonable argument against baiting that I've heard is that it can potentially facilitate the spread of communicable diseases such as CWD. I have not read any peer reviewed studies backing that up, however.

wyohome
November 20, 2013, 07:38 PM
But hey, don't let me stand in the way of your chest thumping macho self image.
Don't let reading comprehension get in the way of yours.

Jason_W
November 20, 2013, 07:51 PM
It's also important to acknowledge that North America is a huge continent with varying environments, terrain, and species.

West of the Mississippi, it seems hunters engage in a lot of spot and stalk hunting. That looks really fun and exciting, but it's not possible in much of the east where visibility in the woods is often limited to 50 yards or less.

Methods such as baiting and deer drives likely wouldn't even work in a lot of more open and vast regions. They are used, where legal, in the east, to increase a hunters chance's of success from pretty much zero to a split hair more than zero.

Similarly, shooting birds on the ground may be unnecessary when shooting pheasants in a corn field (and unsafe when hunting with dogs) but if you're hunting ruffed grouse dogless in Boreal northern forest where you can barely see your hand in front of your face, you'll maybe hit 1/100 birds that get in the air, regardless of how good you are at the sporting clays range.

I guess the point is not to judge a man's hunting methods until you've endured a mile in his hunting grounds.

Jason_W
November 20, 2013, 08:26 PM
which is why I will shoot the gray squirrels and the woodcock..., yum yum yummy!

More power to you. To me, woodcock taste like a dry chicken liver. I find gray squirrel unpleasant and red squirrel repugnant.

I cut my teeth hunting at age 10 on red squirrel. My parents held me to a strict, you kill it, you eat it standard. I stopped shooting red squirrel shortly thereafter, excepting the ones that got into the walls of the house and started tearing up the insulation.

ah, growing up rural . . .

DM~
November 20, 2013, 10:06 PM
The only think i've found those little red squirrels good for, is bait!! AND that's exactly what i use them for!!

http://www.fototime.com/DC9F92E4C69DEB9/standard.jpg

DM

MCgunner
November 20, 2013, 11:19 PM
On the subject of dark meat, I saw a TV show once that documented people hunting puffins in Iceland. That was some of the darkest meat I've seen. It was purplish-black in color. I can only imagine how strong that stuff was.

Generally, birds that migrate have dark meat and it can have that strong taste to it. The BEST I've eaten is sandhill crane. WOW, that's a BIG bird with some tasty, mild dark meat! The drum sticks are a might tough. When I get another, I might try crock potting it with the drum sticks on.

Light meat birds tend to be the flushers, ground dwellers and tend to have the milder meat. They're two different types of muscle. The dark muscle has endurance, the light muscle has quick speed, but not so much endurance.

So, your grouse, your pheasant, your quail, your chicken tend to be the best eating. Eating waterfowl or other such dark meated bird is often an acquired taste. Yes, there are ways of cooking it. My wife LOVES kabobed doves off the grill wrapped in bacon. I kinda like 'em with a piece of jalapeno wrapped in the bacon with the breast meat. I've let her try other dove recipes I like and she turns her nose up at it.

Hey, I like brussel sprouts and she don't. She likes sweet taters and I can't stand 'em. Different strokes....

AKElroy
November 20, 2013, 11:39 PM
This is my 6yr on this particular lease, and the feral pigs are out of control. Since checking their numbers is a priority, we shoot everyone we can and only occasionally do we eat one. Over the years, we've occasionally roasted one of the little footballs for camp food, but I've never had one processed until now.

My son shot his first, a good 180lb sow. I cleaned & gutted her, and ran her down to a processor. She was cleanly shot by my 12 year old, and I just couldn't drag his first to the boneyard. For $85, I got the hams and shoulders whole, slabbed the ribs, and had chops made from the loins.

We slow crocked the ribs in a heavy base of Stubbs BBQ sauce, and OH MY GOODNESS. The bones just fell out, and they were, without a doubt, the most awesome ribs ever.

Tonight we went all Betty Crocker on the pork chops, using good ol' shake n bake, and they were, again, the best chops I've ever tasted. I love the venison, but for flavor, I never expected these pigs to be this good. The boneyard will be seeing far fewer of them from now on. I can see one a month making it home!

MCgunner
November 21, 2013, 09:58 AM
AKElroy, congrats on the epiphany. :D Wild pork is my favorite off the smoker. The ribs are awesome. I make up sausage, too, do all my own. Shoulders, neck, all that get ground, mixed, and stuffed. Awesome stuff. :D I smoke most everything pork. The hams can be a bit fatty to crock pot, but they ARE good that way. I just prefer 'em smoked with mesquite.

brainwake
November 21, 2013, 10:15 AM
You guys are always making me hungry....Do you get any bacon off them there wild ones?

MCgunner
November 21, 2013, 10:39 AM
Bacon requires lots of fat and, usually, feral pigs don't have enough. I have trapped a few that I could have made bacon of the belly meat, but I just grind it up for sausage. I'd have to research making bacon, never done it. Never cured a ham, either.

ZeroJunk
November 21, 2013, 12:06 PM
I have never tried any wild pig. Got to be better than venison.:neener:

T.R.
November 28, 2013, 08:40 AM
It's very difficult for me to pass up a legal deer or other animal. Although I've taken some big heads, these were mostly lucky situations for me.

A doe which weighs about 65 lbs after field dressing makes for a truly magnificent trophy on the dinner table!

TR

Jason_W
November 28, 2013, 01:15 PM
At this point, I would happily forfeit the opportunity to ever shoot a buck if I could get my hands on a doe tag every year.

If I drew a moose tag for Maine, Vermont, or New Hampshire, I would likely pass on a huge bull and instead take a small cow or even a yearling. In all three of these states, moose are required to be checked in whole. No quartering in the field is allowed. I can't imagine how much of a nightmare it would be to try and get a fully grown bull out of a cedar swamp or tangle of logging debris.

Officers'Wife
November 28, 2013, 01:34 PM
You guys are always making me hungry....Do you get any bacon off them there wild ones?
Hi Brain,

Actually on ferals you are better off using the bacon as very lean side meat. Sis in law actually broils it in the slab. But my brother will eat anything.

AKElroy
November 28, 2013, 05:01 PM
I become a meat-only hunter the last week in December, when the deer I really want are either shot at and missed, or taken by other hunters. Last-call deer are always the tastiest. Pigs are shot as pests first, but cleanly shot middle weight sows will certainly be coming home.

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