odd old mechete/sword?


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csa77
November 8, 2013, 06:36 PM
I inherited, along time ago, a few items from my grandfather who served as a combat engineer in the pacific theater in wwII. all the items I inherited I know are Japanese and date to wwII. I would assume this one item is also Japanese but I don't know. its blade length is 24 3/4" its 1 1/2" wide and the spine tapers from its base of 1/8" to about 1/16" toward the end. its very sharp.


Anyone have any idea what this is? Iv always assume its just some sort of old civilian machete

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Sam Cade
November 8, 2013, 07:01 PM
That "No 911" looks like a machete pattern stamp.

Hmmm... must do more research.

jeepnik
November 8, 2013, 07:12 PM
Didn't the US government convert some swords to machetes for issue during WWII?

RC would know.

Ohen Cepel
November 8, 2013, 07:21 PM
I would guess it was a locally done conversion of something else. Maybe for the post war sale to GI's.

I have a Type 99 Arisaka bayonet which was likely cut in 1/2 for surrender which was turned into a nicely done bamboo handled dagger of sorts.

They had lots of war relics and needed to find a use for them.

Sam Cade
November 8, 2013, 07:30 PM
My best guess is that it is one of the bazillion different Collins machetes offered prior to the '60s that has been modified.

rcmodel
November 8, 2013, 08:10 PM
I would agree.
REGLAMENTARIO type machete

Probably not Collins, or it would be marked as such.
Could be one of the other South American or Spanish manufactures back then.

I have been unable to find a #911 Legitimus-Collins pattern.

But they had some that looked an awful lot like that.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Old-Collins-Co-Spanish-American-Cuban-Eagle-Machete-REGLAMENTARIO-Sword-87-/151161308832?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0

rc

Sam Cade
November 8, 2013, 08:37 PM
I have been unable to find a #911 Legitimus-Collins pattern.


The model numbers run sequentially up into the thousands so...

http://www.amazon.com/Collins-Machetes-Bowies-1845-1965-Daniel/dp/0873414039

hso
November 8, 2013, 09:32 PM
Collins had S guards like that on early machetes (Spanish American War era), but they look like brass in most pictures I've seen and this looks like iron.

The blade looks the same as the top one.

csa77
November 9, 2013, 12:29 AM
Before I made my post about this , I tried googling No911+machete but all I ever got was crazy articles about people attacked by machetes.:eek:

Iv already learned a lot from the info you all have spoken about. like Legitimus-Collins a major machete manufacturer, s curve hand guards and the fact that it might not be Japanese but Spanish/south American.
Could it be from a former Spanish colony like the Philippines?
I do remember being told that it was from the around the time of the turn of the century by my mother when I received it and that it had inlayed mother of pearl.
I feel like I have a great head start in finding out more about this machete now


Id like to thank THR // non firearms forum for also identifying my Japanese pole bayonets awhile back ...I had no idea what those were.

hso
November 9, 2013, 07:28 AM
Could it be from a former Spanish colony like the Philippines?

That's my guess.

Deltaboy
November 9, 2013, 12:51 PM
Cool old blades.

rcmodel
November 9, 2013, 01:55 PM
Reglamentario type machetes were carried by Cuban army officers in preference to the sword they were issued.

Thiers were usually more ornate with a brass horsehead pommel and brass guard

Also worn by plantation owners as a badge of authority.

Could be a Spanish American war trophy.
Or it could have been from a poor Philippine plantation owner who couldn't afford a real Reglamentario.

rc

oldbear
November 9, 2013, 07:41 PM
Just some general observations from a lay-person. The hilt appears to be too ornate to be military issue; that does not mean that it may have been a privately supplied weapon. As machetes were intended to be tools, not weapons the few Iíve had any experience with have not had any form of hand/cross guard, and the blades were shorter.
From the inlays on the hilt, Iím would guess it was made somewhere in the Asia Pacific area. Very cool no matter what it is or where it came from.

plmitch
November 13, 2013, 04:18 PM
Very cool old blades.

Speedo66
November 13, 2013, 08:33 PM
"I would assume this one item is also Japanese but I don't know."

I would assume it isn't because I don't think they would use "No." in that alphabet as an abbreviation, more likely to be in Japanese characters.

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