suggestion for folks tired of the issues with public land...


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hipoint
November 15, 2013, 02:06 PM
I own a blueberry farm and have HUGE issues with deer. We take as many as we can, but can't spend all our time out there "hunting".

It may be prudent for folks to contact farms, orchards and vineyards in their area and inquire about hunting their land. Lots of us get depredation permits and can legally take deer out of season as well.

We have a hard time getting folks to actually spend time out there in a stand, they'll show up, spend a couple hours and never come back. So, if you do find a farm willing to let you hunt, show them you're serious about helping them with their issues. It's a win-win and you don't have to worry about the problems of hunting on public land and minus the cost of paying for guided hunts or land leases on hunting clubs...

With season either open or opening soon for much of the country, it dawned on me that this might be a good post to make right now.

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gspn
November 15, 2013, 07:46 PM
Great idea. By the way...what state are you in?

frankenstein406
November 15, 2013, 07:53 PM
If I could find a decent farmer I would love to do this.

BK
November 15, 2013, 08:20 PM
Do farms like yours have good general liability policies? Umbrella policies that would cover mishaps with hunters? You know, if a hunter were to slip or trip on your land and something happens that paralyzes him or his hunting partner. Something to take care of him for the rest of his life? Or if a stray round were to kill someone a few miles away? Do the hunters you permit sign liability waivers?
-find a farm willing to let you hunt-
That's the problem. Some farms don't want to take the risk.

rockhopper46038
November 15, 2013, 08:28 PM
Great idea. By the way...what state are you in?
Wouldn't surprise me if it were Michigan. My grandparents had a blueberry farm outside of Bangor, and there were always deer out there feeding on the bushes.

hipoint
November 15, 2013, 08:31 PM
we do since we are also a teaching farm have a liability policy, but I do not tell anyone this. I very sternly show everyone applicable our swamp and tell them all accidents end up there haha. I'm not too worried about litigation, I can't see it as any different from a normal property owner allowing hunting and as per the stray bullet, I am very stern about where they are allowed to take shots and where they are not. We are in the mountains so there's pretty decent backdrops everywhere as long as you don't shoot/riccochet at someone's home.

That is also why I do not allow off season hunting here anymore, I got too many permits in other folks names to have them spend one morning here and never come back.

We are in North Carolina. And for what good it will do, yes, we do make folks sign liability waivers drafted by an attorney. Can't hurt, but I am aware that it doesn't exactly help either, at least not in the case of "negligence" on our part.


I'm sure lots of farms have had issues like I have out of folks wasting our time, which would put them off to allowing more folks back... Also, the type of farm you call would make a big difference, concentrate on farms where deer can be an issue and not just exist there, such as vineyards and orchards. A guy with a thousand acres of corn might not care as much as a guy with 20 acres of wine grapes or blueberries like us.

rondog
November 15, 2013, 08:33 PM
Got one of those permits in my wallet right now! Good 'til 12/31. Waiting on the call from the landowner to hurry on over, there's does in the house.

marksg
November 15, 2013, 08:36 PM
I'd love to find someone around here that would let me hunt their land. Heck, i'd even help with some work around the place.

newfalguy101
November 15, 2013, 08:37 PM
In my area, it seems that many of the farmers would rather whine about the deer problems and allow ONLY their family members to hunt "their" ground. Oh, and they take bucks, not does, and aren't interested in allowing me to hunt for does on their property.

Granted, my experience is limited.

MCgunner
November 15, 2013, 09:24 PM
Never happen in Texas. Too much money to be made in hunting here. The land owners gripe about the hogs, then charge for the privilege. I can't say that I blame 'em, though, considering property taxes in this state. They tout the lack of an income tax, but they leave out the part about the exorbitant property taxes we put up with. A guy has to make a buck any way he can, I reckon.

gonefishin1
November 15, 2013, 11:34 PM
i have been trying to find a place like that to hunt!!!! I was given permission to hunt some unimproved land so I am going out there to help them work on it. I would be more than willing to work and help out for some hunting

flipajig
November 16, 2013, 12:27 PM
We had a plaice to hunt in Texas where we would trade our time and labor for the privlage to hunt there for Deer and pigs. We did our part helped to cut Cedar fire wood worked on the hunting cabin and build and repair fence. Due to family politics we were asked to leave just after gun season Opened.
The owners daughters husbands family lost ther lease we were the last to join the ranch so we lost out. After spending the summer working on the ranch $$ wasn't a issue.

The Big Game Hunter
November 16, 2013, 12:44 PM
Interesting idea that I had never though of before. I guess this all boils down to finding the right person and building a good relationship with them.

hipoint
November 16, 2013, 12:58 PM
yep, I know if I had some folks who were close enough and seriously helped out some, I'd be very grateful. Selfishness is a far too common trait now, seems like most people don't mind chucking their morals for a dollar. (I wrote buck, but that was just confusing haha)...

anyhow, I was just sharing, I remember hunting public land. when I was a kid my stepfather took me hunting alot and since we didn't own anything, it was always on public land. Seemed like every time we had a spot staked out, we would get there and there would already be a truck parked on the side of the road... I was raised with unspoken rules of you park your truck on the side of the road that you're hunting and you certainly don't infringe on someone else's spot, true it's all public land, but whoever got there first was the one in the right.... We only have a 3 week rifle season with no sunday hunting, so for a working fella, that's like 3 days to deer hunt unless you take time off work... so to get to "your" spot and find another truck there was always a bummer, then we'd have to go find somewhere else by then it would be dawn... etc..

ask around though, this time of year, orchards and vineyards would be the ones I would look for, anywhere that grows perennial crops that the deer can damage in the dormant season.

Good luck folks!

hoghunting
November 17, 2013, 01:11 AM
hipoint,

Can you keep deer killed with depredation permits in NC? A friend moved to western NC last year and the owner of an apple orchard told him deer killed with depredation permits have to stay where they fall and the meat can't be taken. Any truth to that? Thanks.

Encoreman
November 17, 2013, 03:14 AM
I have a co-worker that lives in Fl panhandle and the deer are problems in the peanut fields they shoot them and let them lay with depradation permits

hipoint
November 17, 2013, 01:09 PM
hipoint,

Can you keep deer killed with depredation permits in NC? A friend moved to western NC last year and the owner of an apple orchard told him deer killed with depredation permits have to stay where they fall and the meat can't be taken. Any truth to that? Thanks.
N.C. has some funny laws, however they are VERY clear. In N.C. ANY property OWNER can shoot an animal in the act of destroying property. Period. However you have to burn it, bury it, or call the wardens to come dispose of it as they see fit, usually somewhere on the property however there are laws regarding this as well. It's pretty clear cut about getting rid of critters hurting your property without much grey area. HOWEVER, that's what the depredation permits are for... so you can eat them. Your friend needs to talk to some wildlife service agents (game wardens), my guess is he hasn't done this and is just going on rumor. I've heard so many things regarding hunting laws over the years that I finally quit believing them, if I have a question, I call the wildlife commission (number is in the game laws book) and ask them for myself. They've been quite helpful. When I get the wardens out here they write me a permit that is good for one month at a time, and usually list it for 5 deer. That covers spotlighting, does, out of season, pretty much anything as long as you don't break federal laws. Their explanation of that was "no full auto for hunting"... However it does allow for sunday gun hunting (which is currently illegal in western n.c.). Anyhow, my guess is, if your friend actually calls the game wardens and has a valid complaint about the deer (or other wildlife), they will come out and inspect the damage, then write him permits for as long as he likes. They do not like to get out to a "farm" and find out that it's a garden size area unless the damage is really super severe. As long as you're straight with them, they're very helpful. Before hogs were considered Feral in this part of the state, some friends of mine got a depredation permit based solely on damage to their lawn... but, it was pretty bad.

hope that helped!

**sorry, misread your post... If your friend isn't the orchard owner, then it is in a grey area about shooting deer WITHOUT a permit. However to be 100% by the letter of the law, the land owner has to call the game wardens, get them to come and write a permit in both his name AND the name of the person hunting (I think space on the permit allows for 3 names). This permit allows you to eat the animal, transport carcass, etc. Most farmers, Like me, have gotten tired of going through the process of calling wardens, waiting on them to arrive (which might take 2 weeks), walking the land with them etc.. to get a permit for someone else who then only shows up once or twice during the month. That's why I quit getting permits for other folks, now I only get them for myself. They're free, don't cost anything, but still a pain in the butt to get. I never quite understood that, folks would be very excited about getting to legally spotlight and hunt out of season as well as being able to take up to 5 deer, then only show up for an hour maybe two hours in the whole month. After that happened over and over, I no longer go through the stuff to get permits for others, but I do allow in-season hunting here.

hoghunting
November 17, 2013, 01:15 PM
Thanks, hipoint. Betting the apple orchard owner doesn't get the depredation permits.

hipoint
November 17, 2013, 01:21 PM
just wanted to add... if you are a 'real' farm, meaning you earn your income from the farm, they are usually ok with being pretty flexible with you. They said the laws aren't in place to punish farmers or give them a hard time, they're in place to stop a guy who owns a garden from shooting every deer in his area. "real" farms get special attention from the wildlife commission, and while they certainly won't break the law for you, they will help you in any way possible.

hipoint
November 17, 2013, 01:31 PM
this is a public forum and I don't advocate breaking any laws, but I did find this amusing...

A fella I know actually DID get in trouble for shooting AND EATING a deer on his land without a permit. remember, the permit is really only there to allow you to eat it. anyhow, he beat the charge in court. The law is VERY specific and has no mention of eating it or not, just says burn, bury, or have game wardens dispose of it. His argument was he did burn it, on his grill :neener:

haha, I doubt that will every work as an argument again, and those guys are so nice and helpful just calling them and doing it legally is the right way to go, but I hope yall can get some amusment out of that like I did.

Officers'Wife
November 17, 2013, 06:55 PM
I own a blueberry farm and have HUGE issues with deer. We take as many as we can, but can't spend all our time out there "hunting".

It may be prudent for folks to contact farms, orchards and vineyards in their area and inquire about hunting their land. Lots of us get depredation permits and can legally take deer out of season as well.

We have a hard time getting folks to actually spend time out there in a stand, they'll show up, spend a couple hours and never come back. So, if you do find a farm willing to let you hunt, show them you're serious about helping them with their issues. It's a win-win and you don't have to worry about the problems of hunting on public land and minus the cost of paying for guided hunts or land leases on hunting clubs...

With season either open or opening soon for much of the country, it dawned on me that this might be a good post to make right now.
HiPoint,

One thing to add is the assurance they will respect the property and not leave litter and outright trash. Not to mention as a matter of politeness contact the owner before they enter the property and when they are about to leave. And most important is game recognition...

If it's black and white with non-branching horns it's a cow, not going to make your hosts happy if you shoot it.

If it's black with the hind end lower than the front and a hump it's a bison and somebody is probably fond of it.

If it's green and making noise it's either a tractor or a combine and the operator is authorized to shoot back.

hipoint
November 17, 2013, 10:12 PM
HiPoint,

One thing to add is the assurance they will respect the property and not leave litter and outright trash. Not to mention as a matter of politeness contact the owner before they enter the property and when they are about to leave. And most important is game recognition...

If it's black and white with non-branching horns it's a cow, not going to make your hosts happy if you shoot it.

If it's black with the hind end lower than the front and a hump it's a bison and somebody is probably fond of it.

If it's green and making noise it's either a tractor or a combine and the operator is authorized to shoot back.
haha, right? I always tell folks when they hunt, they don't have to get specific permission since they already have it, but they need to park their car in my driveway so I'll see it and know they're out there...

I thought it went without saying to do the other stuff, but yeah, that too... sometimes I forget that not everyone is polite.

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