Bangstick?


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shippy1963
November 19, 2013, 08:33 AM
hi can anyone tell me where i can get blue prints for making a a bagstick

shippy1963

as i going to make up a few am a commercial fisherman and always loosing them

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USAF_Vet
November 20, 2013, 02:41 PM
A bang stick is pretty much just a well machined zip gun.

I would take care not to lose one, as each one is a NFA any other weapon (AOW) and requires a $200 tax stamp to make and/or purchase.

Zip gun plans can be found online, although the ones I've seen are rather crude.

Blue prints are not exactly needed. A couple lengths of pipe, one serving as a barrel and the other the receiver. A spring, a hunk of steel with a machined firing pin to serve as a bolt, and a locking device to hold back the bolt.

JTHunter
November 20, 2013, 05:25 PM
You can probably get one at a SCUBA dive shop. Bangsticks usually had a shotgun shell as they were intended to fend off the large, dangerous marine life, namely sharks.

As this was back in the '70's, they may have expanded their "calibers" offered for smaller gamefish. Check dive shops first and you may not have to "make" one.

Willie Sutton
November 21, 2013, 04:59 PM
"I would take care not to lose one, as each one is a NFA any other weapon (AOW) and requires a $200 tax stamp to make and/or purchase".



:banghead:

No they are not. They are not even considered to be firearms and are not regulated at all.

They are stupidly simple to make on a lathe: The rear portion is threaded on one end to accept a shaft, and the other end is bored out to a diameter that will allow a sliding chamber/barrel assembly to be a slip fit into. A fixed firing pin is also machined into the rear piece. The second piece is a chamber/barrel that is a slip-fit into the rear part, with a groove machined in it to allow a rubber o-ring to be added to add some friction to the system so the barrel does not simply fall out when the muzzle is pointed down. Usually the two are connected by a length of stainless steel fishing leader to keep them together. Often a cross hole is drilled to allow a cotter pin to be installed as a cross-bolt safety.

Load them by dropping in a shell (waterproofed blanks work best actually) and then slide the barrel into the receiver. The cross-pin ought to keep the primer from resting on the firing pin.

To fire, remove the pin and jam the assembly onto the fish. The barrel slides back and the primer is hit by the fixed firing pin. It's the gas-stream that kills the fish, not the projectile. Waterproof blanks work well. The favorite caliber is .38, and industrial cartridge operated stud firing blanks work great.

Two simple lathe turnings and a cotter pin as a safety.

The legally need to be 26 inches in length. Usually we weld a stainless steel rod to the side of the rear piece, leaving the threaded center hole free to add whatever handle is desired. Many guys use the quick-connect boathook fittings as the actual handle.


Here's a commercial maker:

https://www.billsbangsticks.com/


I've made dozens of them.


Willie

.

USAF_Vet
November 21, 2013, 05:23 PM
A powerhead may be considered a firearm under some circumstances. In the US, the BATFE considers a powerhead a firearm if it is not permanently affixed to a shaft; generally powerheads are sold spot welded to a temporary steel shaft giving an overall length of greater than 18 inches (45 cm). After installing permanently on a spear shaft, the spot weld is cut, and the temporary shaft discarded.[3] Revenue Ruling 55-569, C.B. 1955-2, 483 says:

A device ostensibly designed for submarine spear fishing, but capable of chambering and firing .22 caliber rimfire ammunition, is a firearm within the purview of the National Firearms Act. However, such device, if permanently attached to the speargun shaft by the manufacturer, would not be a firearm.


So I was wrong, kind of, with the NFA AOW part. They can be considered an AOW if they do not meet certain requirements are not met.

Arizona_Mike
November 21, 2013, 06:20 PM
Given the large number of non-shotshell smooth-bore bangsticks and powerheads, I pthat there is a specific ATF ruling or set of rulings that take these out of the purview of the NFA.

Failing that make sure it uses a shot shell and is over 26" length (with the barrel portion over 18" if you have some provision for firing from the shoulder).

Mike

PS. Does anyone know anything about the 48" requirement here (http://www.titleii.com/bardwell/rr_55569.txt)???

Elkins45
November 24, 2013, 11:26 AM
How hard do you actually have to whack one of these things against a fish for it to fire?

saltydog452
November 24, 2013, 12:27 PM
Just a WAG, but I'd imagine such a tool would fall into the same catagory as gas from a nonexplosive CO2 ctg.

Such a knife-stick does/did exist. Back in the 70s, 'blackened' shark was good to eat.

salty

Willie Sutton
November 24, 2013, 01:03 PM
^^^

1: "Not very". A good basic tap with the stick is enough to fire the primer. Lots of mass in the entire handle and pole as compared to the mass of a firing pin in a pistol, etc. Doesn't take a lot.

2: What the next poster is referring to is a Farrallon Shark Dart. Basically a large hypodermic needle attached to a pole with an impact-pierced CO2 cartridge that first penetrates into the body cavity of a shark by the diver stabbing it, then fires the CO2 cartridge into the body cavity. This gas bubble pushes the sharks viscera out thru its mouth, inflating it and sending it to the surface bloodlessly (and dead) silently. An advanced version was pressurized with high pressure air from a scuba divers tank before use and was multi-shot (3) before needing recharging. It's reported that USN Porpoises were fitted with these on their noses for anti-swimmer use. Can't attest to that but I've got one of the commercial ones on my desk. They have no legal definition as anything. Be bad news to be stabbed with one. For sharks they are harder to employ than a bang stuck, as you need to penetrate the organ cavity. With a bang ditch you hit them on the pointy end where the teeth are.

Willie

.

dprice3844444
November 24, 2013, 02:42 PM
https://www.billsbangsticks.com/shop/page/1?sessid=rguUq701DbTjhSQkmFy5ddWoZNKpyzybdt2JV6a9Ue90hKe6fJNX0jEHrOVmdTwx
http://www.bluewaterhunter.com/education/education_bangsticks.html
http://www.diversdiscountflorida.com/prodDetails.cfm?itemID=599
http://custombangsticks.com/products.html
http://www.spearfishingworld.com/torres-powerhead.html

Elkins45
November 24, 2013, 03:57 PM
2: What the next poster is referring to is a Farrallon Shark Dart. Basically a large hypodermic needle attached to a pole with an impact-pierced CO2 cartridge that first penetrates into the body cavity of a shark by the diver stabbing it, then fires the CO2 cartridge into the body cavity. This gas bubble pushes the sharks viscera out thru its mouth, inflating it and sending it to the surface bloodlessly (and dead) silently.

SNIP

They have no legal definition as anything. Be bad news to be stabbed with one. For sharks they are harder to employ than a bang stuck, as you need to penetrate the organ cavity.

Willie.

Here's a company making a similar implement and trying to sell them as an all-purpose defensive tool: http://www.waspknife.com/index.php

Zeeemu
November 24, 2013, 05:21 PM
Never mind.

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