one pound of powder.


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ms6852
December 4, 2013, 01:44 PM
About how many loads will one pound of powder yield using 70gr Barnes TSX, .224 caliber. I am going to load for my brothers and they are going to chip in on expenses for powder, primers, and bullets. I've just received my press so am quite new to this. So we are splitting expenses 3 ways. They want to know whether its cheaper to buy factory ammo or do the loads with me.

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Schwing
December 4, 2013, 01:45 PM
There are 7000 grains of powder in 1 pound. You need to know how many grains of powder each load will use.

For example, I have loads that use 15 grains of blue dot. 7000 divided by 15 is 466. I always subtract about 5 rounds from that number for spills etc.

plmitch
December 4, 2013, 01:50 PM
What are you using for powder? Load size?

GLOOB
December 4, 2013, 01:54 PM
If you were to use a traditional 223 powder (fastish rifle powder) going for close to max velocity for that bullet, you're looking at about 20 grains per round. Plus or minus a few. So that's about 350 rounds, or so.

With the slower powders for that caliber, like say Varget or IMR4895, you might get around 280-300. Faster powders maybe upwards of 400.

If you're going to load a bullet as expensive as that one, you should probably do a little research as to the optimal powder, first. I'm going to guess it's cheaper to buy "standard" factory ammo vs 70gr Barnes. If you wanna load to save money, you might wanna try some 55-62gr bullets from Hornady, Midway "dogtown bullets," or if you're lucky you can find pulls. Even then, you don't traditionally save a whole lot of money loading 223. I haven't shopped factory 223 in a long time, so YMMV.

If you wanna load for better performance, well then you're in for some experimentation.

Rule3
December 4, 2013, 02:09 PM
Your bullets are going to be more of an expense;)

Those bullets are probably around .60 cents each. Your powder at lets say $20 per lb using 25 grains is about .05 to .07 cents. per round. Plus a primer. So around .70 cents a round using a premium bullet.

I guesstimated on the high side. All depends on how much you paid for the components adjusted for inflation and crazy prices. YMMV


price per lb
--------------------- = price per grain x number of grains in load= price of powder per cartridge
7000 grains per lb

ms6852
December 4, 2013, 02:39 PM
Thanks guys for the information. You gave me the answer I needed to know. I have not decided what powder I am going to use yet. I also will be loading Sierra 69gr HPBT match kings, and Hornady 75gr bthp. Now that I know there are 7000 grains per pound I can figure out the rest. I feel like a little kid now that I am retired I have time to do all this, plus I will be performing ladder tests on each of the different bullets to see what my rifle likes. I feel like giggling all the time now that I don't have to go work. You guys are awesome, thanks.

KansasSasquatch
December 4, 2013, 03:10 PM
$30 per 50 bullets+$0.60 per bullet
$30 per pound of powder (figuring somewhat high local gun shop price), 26gr load (maybe high for a 70gr TSX) is 260rounds per pound=$0.11 of powder per round
$40 per 1000 primers (that's on the high side most places)=$0.04
*free* brass

You're looking at $0.75 per round using those premium bullets, and relatively expensive powder and primers. A 20 round box would cost about $15 for you to load. Compare that to about $30/box of 20 for similar factory loads at Midway, most of these http://www.midwayusa.com/find?sortby=1&itemsperpage=24&newcategorydimensionid=15646 are comparable. It's definitely worth it if you have the free time to load, test, and load (then maybe test and load again). If they just want "plinking" ammo, that's a bad choice of bullets unless where you live/shoot requires the use of lead free projectiles. But if they want ammo appropriate for medium sized game or potentially home defense, good choice.

MtnCreek
December 4, 2013, 04:36 PM
I've just received my press so am quite new to this. So we are splitting expenses 3 ways.

Have y'all discussed how you would split any expense from damages that could occur from your reloads?

Rule3
December 4, 2013, 04:56 PM
Have y'all discussed how you would split any expense from damages that could occur from your reloads?

Well they are bothers and certainly would not want to see a Family Feud!:uhoh:

Might not be a bad idea to have everyone sign a ain't my fault clause.;)

NCsmitty
December 4, 2013, 05:19 PM
Just curious what firearm(s) you're using for these loads?


NCsmitty

oneounceload
December 4, 2013, 05:36 PM
Your powder at lets say $20 per lb

You haven't bought powder in quite some time it seems......... ;) The days of $20/lb are long gone UNLESS you buy in 8# jugs

ms6852
December 4, 2013, 05:48 PM
I'm loading for a RRA, a Bravo Company build,a bushmaster and a colt, but mainly it will be for the RRA its the predator pursuit with a 20" heavy barrel. I plan to load specifically for this rifle because it out shoot all the others. I want to perform a ladder test. This rifle is my long range system in this caliber. Five hundred yards is boring with this rifle just using regular ball ammo. I'm challenging myself to 900 to 1000 yards, I know I can do 800 because of my skill.

My brothers on the other hand they love guns but do not know how to spell MOA, ballistics, trajectory, or bullet coefficient. They really don't care they just want to shoot at something. I figure they can help me defray costs.

gahunter12
December 4, 2013, 06:03 PM
1st. Have then sign a waiver that its not your fault when they have a Kaboom.
2nd. I'm just pulling your chain.

Serious. I WOULD NOT load for friends, or family. I have been loading for 5yrs, and have well over 90,000 rounds loaded so far. I still refuse to load for family, and friends. If they want to buy the components, and use my press to load themselves that's fine, and I will help them.

I would start with reading, reading, & reading a manual. studying loads, & finding the components. I would start with a lighter bullet that's safer. When using a 70gr bullet in a .223 you don't have a lot of room left in the case. Some powders will be compressed with a 70gr bullet. I would get my feet wet with cheap 55gr FMJ BT bullets like these. http://www.xtremebullets.com/category-s/48076.htm.

Rule3
December 4, 2013, 06:31 PM
You haven't bought powder in quite some time it seems......... ;) The days of $20/lb are long gone UNLESS you buy in 8# jugs

I am connected and know people, who know people:D

Onewolf
December 4, 2013, 06:46 PM
As others have already suggested, if your brothers just want plinking rounds then I would recommend using the Hornady 55gr FMJBT bullets which are pretty easy to get for around $.10/bullet.

KansasSasquatch
December 4, 2013, 07:23 PM
As others have already suggested, if your brothers just want plinking rounds then I would recommend using the Hornady 55gr FMJBT bullets which are pretty easy to get for around $.10/bullet.
Exactly. If the brothers don't know a thing about accuracy then those fancy TSX bullets are a waste of money. Just about ANY FMJ .224 bullets will work for accuracy by volume plinking. I wouldn't even use TSX bullets for accuracy loads, too expensive when there's other perfectly good choices for half the price. Not to mention the other "headaches" that come with loading solids.

forestswin
December 4, 2013, 07:37 PM
$30 a pound - three brothers - I'd say everyone pitches in $10
just like a bar tab:D

or is that underthinking it?

ArchAngelCD
December 4, 2013, 09:41 PM
There are plenty of good powders for loading the .223 Rem but finding them is the problem. I have not gotten any yet but I hear nothing but good about Hodgdon's new CFE223 powder. An out of state friend who competes is using it and he tells me it really does eliminate copper fouling in the barrel. That also comes in handy on a dog hunt!

ms6852
December 5, 2013, 12:33 AM
Okay the brothers get the fmj's 55gr. I use the 70gr TSX for hog hunting some of the hogs get pretty big and this round seems to do job quite well. On occasion I do run into a monster that I know the .223 is to small so I use the 35 rem on them.

gahunter12
December 5, 2013, 07:52 AM
I use the 70gr TSX for hog hunting some of the hogs get pretty big and this round seems to do job quite well. On occasion I do run into a monster that I know the .223 is to small so I use the 35 rem on them

The 70gr TSX is a Loooong bullet. Do some research before loading. You may find yourself playing with compressed loads. My hog loads are .62gr TSX which are as long as some .70gr FMJ bullets. Our pigs usually range between 75lb-250lb. I just did a google search on "powder for 70gr .223 bullets". I was able to find lots of info on different fourms about 70gr bullets, including here. If you don't have a chrono, get one.

horsemen61
December 5, 2013, 09:00 AM
Also I'd like to make a point in saying that never take someone's load off the Internet or out of a conversation without first checking at least two if not three creditable sources when done properly handloading is a fun and rewarding hobby but done improperly you could be seriously injured or die so be safe always ALL WAYS

ms6852
December 5, 2013, 12:39 PM
The 70gr TSX is a Loooong bullet. Do some research before loading. You may find yourself playing with compressed loads. My hog loads are .62gr TSX which are as long as some .70gr FMJ bullets. Our pigs usually range between 75lb-250lb. I just did a google search on "powder for 70gr .223 bullets". I was able to find lots of info on different fourms about 70gr bullets, including here. If you don't have a chrono, get one.
This opens a whole can of worms, the chrono, not the compressed load. I also have a Tikka T3 light bolt rifle in left hand I bought in which I can use the 70gr TSX if it does not fit my magazines. Too bad they discontinued this caliber.

Anyway, what model of chrono do most of you use and how far away is it placed from the rifle?

howlnmad
December 5, 2013, 12:56 PM
I see talk of 62 and 70 grain bullets. My question is what twist rate barrel are you planning on shooting these out of. Those long heavy bullets are going to need some speed to get them to stabilize.

gahunter12
December 5, 2013, 01:42 PM
Anyway, what model of chrono do most of you use and how far away is it placed from the rifle?

This is the one I have. Competition Electronics Pro Digital Chrono. http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B0028MTBJ4/ref=redir_mdp_mobile/182-9246572-9986820. They have it in stock for $93 with free shipping.

I set mine at 15ft from the muzzle. It's a must have for working up loads.

ms6852
December 5, 2013, 11:44 PM
I have a 1/8 twist on my barrels. Thanks for the link gahunter12.

MikeS.
December 6, 2013, 05:31 AM
You haven't bought powder in quite some time it seems......... ;) The days of $20/lb are long gone UNLESS you buy in 8# jugs
Not true, 2 weeks ago I bought Blue Dot for $19.95 a lb at a large gun show in Northern Va. I bought 2 lbs at that price. 3-4 weeks ago I bought 3 lbs of 2400 for $21.95 a lb at my LGS.

So it is still out there at decent prices.

Vodoun da Vinci
December 6, 2013, 09:15 AM
Roger that...bought 3 lbs of Unique at $16 and change a few weeks ago. If you shop and are patient you can find powder at "pre hoarding" prices but if you must have it right now (and some must have powder right now) then you pay a little more.

I have seen the same Unique I paid $16 for at $30+ and I will not pay that price.

VooDoo

gahunter12
December 6, 2013, 10:20 AM
I agree. I have been watching a local FFl that sells out of his home, and posts his inventory on one of our local fourms. He had a shippment of H335 come in back in Oct. he's asking $32.95/lb, or $240/8lb. He has sold a little, but not much. I did some trading with a guy on the forum last month for my unopened 4lb of Benchmark for his unopened 4lb of H335. The FFL pm'd me about having H335 for sale, but I told him he could keep it for those prices.

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