regular dies in a progressive?


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roval
December 8, 2013, 08:02 PM
I'm thinking of getting a Dillon RL550B. currently reloading on a redding turret t7 press. I have redding dies for 9 mm, 45 acp and 223 rem. they are the regular carbide dies(for the pistol) not the one that has a more radiused mouth. Will these be ok for a progressive or do I have to get new dies, the taper crimp I'm using for 9 mm is from Dillon and the opening is wider. I know the thread will fit wondering if the brass will shoot into the opening easily without adjusting the brass by hand as i'm pulling the lever.

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HexHead
December 8, 2013, 08:05 PM
I use Lee dies for pistol rounds and RCBS for rifles in my 550b with no issues. I might get a set of Dillon dies for .38 at some point, but the others are fine.

UKWildcats
December 8, 2013, 08:41 PM
I use Lee dies -- 45acp, 40 S&W, 223, 30-08, and 30-06.

Use RCBS 9mm Dies -- just found them at a Gun Show Cheap.

No issues so far.

For rifle I only use Neck Re-Size Dies in Station 1 -- I Full Length Re-Size in a Lee Single Stage Press before loading the brass in the Dillon.

UK

243winxb
December 8, 2013, 09:01 PM
Google Dillon alignment tool.

TBH
December 8, 2013, 09:20 PM
I started with RCBS dies in my 550b. Once I tried a set of Dillion pistol dies, that became all that I would use. It sucks stopping the rhythm to wiggle the brass to line it up in the sizer die.

cfullgraf
December 8, 2013, 09:23 PM
If the die has a 7/8"-14 thread, it should work just fine on a Dillon 550.

tootall
December 8, 2013, 09:34 PM
I have both a 550 and 650. The Dillon dies are worth it for pistol if you end up doing higher volume or rates. The features of the dies...taper of carbide and floating recap are really good.

Regular dies work fine, but the Dillon dies work really well. Yes, I'm a fan...for 20 years of use.

Katitmail
December 9, 2013, 02:30 AM
I have 2 set's of Lee (45ACP and 9x18 MAK) and 1 set of Dillon (9mm)

You have very valid question. Lee dies definitely work but not as good. Because of openings they do not "float" and whole operation feels more "jerky" if you can call it so.

Right now I'm planning for loading 38/357 and leaning towards Dillon dies. When I load 9mm everything just goes so smooth.

SASS#23149
December 9, 2013, 02:54 AM
they will work,but the ones with tapered/wider openings work somewhat better. Try it before you spend the money though,you might just like it.
Here is how I see the difference...someone who likes to go a bazillion miles an hour on their machine is gonna FUBAR brass if it hangs up on the die mouth. Someone like myself who has lots of time and goes slow,can put up with them,which I do,because I had them.

45lcshooter
December 9, 2013, 05:45 AM
Standard thread dies will work in the Dillon. But Dillon dies are much better. I tried a Dillon with Dillon dies, and it was sweet!!! But I'm a poor country folk, so I'll stick with my Rockchucker and Lee progressive for my pistol rounds.

gahunter12
December 9, 2013, 07:49 AM
I will second the Dillon dies being better, but other will work fine. I use Dillon dies for every caliber except .223. My .223 die set is a Lee set with the FCD (collet), and I use a FCD on my .38spl loads, but use a Dillon sizing, and seating die.

Also once you clean a set of Dillon dies for the first time, you will ask yourself why you didn't buy them sooner! Pull a clip, and they come apart for a easy cleaning! You never loose your adjustments.

Constrictor
December 9, 2013, 08:11 AM
any dies will work in the Dillon 550, but I really like the Dillon dies and have switched over to them exclusively on that press.

243winxb
December 9, 2013, 08:11 AM
http://i338.photobucket.com/albums/n420/joe1944usa/Firearms%20%20and%20%20Reloading/Dillon%20RL-450%20Manual/ToolDillon.jpgThe Dillon Alignment Tool is in the form of a pin. You place the powder die in station one and drop the pin in. With the shell plate off and the shell platform bolts loose. You take the ram up and down until if will slip in and out of the shell platform plate hole without moving the pin. Then you snug the bolts up and make sure you still have proper alignment. If you do then tighten them screws up and reinstall your shell plate and move your powder die back. You will, of course have to reset your decap/resize die. I do that by keeping a resized case on hand and putting it in station one, running the ram to the top and then screw the die down until it just touches the shell plate. By adjusting it with the case in the die and plate, you have proper alignment of the die when snugging it down. This works for old Dillon RL 450 progressive. Don't know about the newer ones ??

roval
December 9, 2013, 11:20 PM
thanks for the info will try out my current dies first when I do get the press.

noylj
December 10, 2013, 01:13 AM
Dillon dies: they are fine dies but no better than almost any other. The seating and crimp dies are of benefit if (1) you are loading lead bullets and (2) you have way too much lube on the bullets and it starts to build up on the seating stem. Personally, I have never had a build-up in lube cause problems, as all my seating stems from various manufacturers have cavities for the lube to flow into and I gave up Lubri-Sizer mess decades ago.
The main "problem" I have is with the Dillon sizing dies. Due to the huge chamfer entering the die, the die simply doesn't size down as far as others. I much prefer the Lee and Hornady sizing dies.
In terms of die alignment, I have always run a case or round into the die and locked the die down with the case still in--thus getting alignment. Don't know the it helps, but it makes sense to me.
Other than that, you would have a timing issue to correct and no die can correct that.

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