Need some tips


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BryceChambers
December 8, 2013, 10:34 PM
Okay, I never have been hunting, always more of a fisherman, my father used to hunt but stopped when my older brother was born for lack of time and he just never got into it again he took up fishing instead which I grew up doing and love it. Well my uncle was a huge hunter until my little cousin was born and then he got laid off so struggled financially so he dropped almost all of his hobbies for work and such, just recently he joined a hunt club again and he is not hunting this year but will next so I am going to ask him to help me out. Before I do that I would like to have my own equipment so I'm not completely relying on him, I live in Central Virginia and of course need my hunters safety course and such, and I will be Whitetail Deer hunting and it will be shotgun season. Now first of all I'm kinda worried because I'm 18 and most kids around here have hunted with their parents since little kids while I'm an adult and barely know a thing about it, will that be a problem like being almost looked down on or does nobody really care? Then what is some stuff I need, probably a tree stand for starters, I of course already have a shotgun ready for it, some fall/winter clothing, you know just anything you think I would need so I'm not relying on my uncle for all my equipment. Thanks!

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courtgreene
December 9, 2013, 12:57 AM
Orange. I ALWAYS seem to be loaning that mess to someone. You'd think more people would want to remain unshot and would buy their own. Get an orange vest so you don't have to wear his. And a good flashlight.

Patocazador
December 9, 2013, 09:42 AM
Binoculars, a good, light climbing stand, a folding knife with a ~3" blade, and for early season hunting, a Thermacell for mosquitoes.

Vol46
December 9, 2013, 10:26 AM
A nice camo backpack to carry all the stuff you will accumulate. You will get a lot of the education you need about safely handling guns from your hunter safety course. Hopefully, your Uncle is a good deer hunter, and can teach you how to scout and look for sign, pick a good spot for a stand, etc., but it would probably be a good idea to read articles in magazines, the internet, & such about deer & deer hunting. The main thing is to find a piece of property where deer are reasonably plentiful, & sit still even after you have been there so long you think the deer are never going to show up.

BryceChambers
December 9, 2013, 10:37 AM
Thanks guys! And also, I see most hunters with camoed shotguns is that really needed? Mine is just black.

Art Eatman
December 9, 2013, 11:10 AM
While the camo might be of some slight help, being motionless is more important. And when you do move, do it very slowly (absent a need for a rapid snap-shot).

I hunted for years with a high-gloss Weatherby Mark V. Never saw where the gloss made any difference when I was sitting. Moving, my body alone would have been plenty to spook a deer.

lpsharp88
December 9, 2013, 11:43 PM
I was/am in a very similar situation as you are. I am 25 and went on my first deer about a month ago. Had been rabbit hunting twice with my uncle, but took on deer hunting alone. I'm not saying this to scare you or anything, but I'd avoid buying anything expensive until you are sure you will enjoy it. Like you, I already had a shotgun, so I went out and got the blaze orange stuff and the licenses/tags, and that was it. I didn't want to buy a stand or blind or anything like that until I gave it a try or two. I found a place that had signs of deer, and leaned up against a tree that had a good shooting lane.
That's just my $.02

gspn
December 10, 2013, 12:15 AM
Now first of all I'm kinda worried because I'm 18 and most kids around here have hunted with their parents since little kids while I'm an adult and barely know a thing about it, will that be a problem like being almost looked down on or does nobody really care?

Don't be worried at all about this. I go out of my way ALL THE TIME to help people out who are just starting. I didn't start hunting until I was 22 or 23 years old. I taught myself everything I needed to know by reading, asking questions, and going out as much as I could.

Do your homework. Your area probably has a local game and fish magazine...buy it every month. Read it cover to cover...keep it by the bedside. As you read it you will learn. Reading will also foster more questions that you'll want to research...which will lead to more learning.

Everyone has to start somewhere. The most important thing to remember is to be SAFE. No deer in the world is worth accidentally shooting someone.

Your uncle will be a great source of info for you as he has already hunted the area. He'll be familiar with the gear and tactics that work best in your region...start with him. You might also find a local internet forum.

I've introduced dozens of people to hunting, fishing, and shooting over the years...if you can't get your questions answered anywhere else feel free to PM me. I'd be happy to help out with any questions you have.

Good luck, and go get 'em!

CarJunkieLS1
December 10, 2013, 09:56 AM
I'm 28 and went deer hunting the first time a few weeks ago. So OP don't get discouraged if you have an open ear and a person who is willing to teach you will be just fine. I had the same questions you did and the responses you got are spot-on. A back pack, a good knife, rope, and a flashlight and latex gloves are what I started with. I shot a deer and had all that I needed. Good Luck and be safe.

BryceChambers
December 10, 2013, 10:01 AM
Thanks everybody for all the help. I'm looking forward to it, I've enjoyed small hunting like squirrels and rabbit trapping and such so its time to take a step up and try deer!

buck460XVR
December 10, 2013, 10:17 AM
Most seasoned hunters enjoy passing the hunting tradition on to young hunters. Even @ 18 you are a young hunter. Most 18 tear olds than have been hunting since 12 still have a lot to learn. In other words, don't be intimidated by your lack of experience. Enjoy the fact that you are new and folks are taking the time to show you how. Take the good natured ribbing of being the newbie and the mistakes they make, knowing that some day, there will be another newbie to rib. Take your Gun Safety course and learn how to operate and handle your firearm safely. When hunting with others more knowledgeable than you, listen to them and don't double guess or question them. The exception would be when it comes to safety....your class and it's instructors will be correct on that. They may not know hunting skills or ethics, but they will know safety. Do not do something unsafe, even if you mentors tell you to and do not compromise your ethics. Enjoy the experience and consider your first opportunities as learning experiences. Do not get sucked into the idea that you must shoot something to be successful. Do not let the pressures of success force you to make bad decisions on whether a shot should be taken or to "make something happen". If you are a guest at a camp or lease, you hunt the way they do and how they tell you....and be appreciative. Be the camp bitch and do the jobs no one else wants to do. Don't whine about bein' cold or wet or seein' no game. Suck it up...that's part of hunting. Again...most of all, hunt safely. Nuttin' turns other hunters off and gets folks not invited back faster than someone who is reckless and careless with their firearm.

Wolfgang james
December 10, 2013, 12:59 PM
Don't go hog wild buying everything at once. A gun, knife and orange are the essentials. If you will be hunting from the ground a folding chair or foam butt pad will make things a little more enjoyable. Just remember not every Yahoo with a gun is a hunter and good advice is great but bad advice is deadly. If you ever hear about someone taking a "sound shot" find out where they hunt and plan your hunt for miles away

WayBeau
December 10, 2013, 07:32 PM
If you ever hear about someone taking a "sound shot" find out where they hunt and plan your hunt for miles away

^^^ Oh, how I wish this never happened. This is how people get killed in the woods. A 'Sound' shot is when someone hears a sound and shoots in that direction. I didn't think it really happened until I read an article about someone getting killed as a result of one. So do yourself a favor and take Wolfgang's advice. If you hear someone talking about taking a 'sound' shot, hunt somewhere else.

Lots of good advice on here. Definitely don't go and buy everything all at once. While head-to-toe camo is nice, our grandfather's didn't have it and they killed deer all the time. A gun you can shoot well, some blaze orange, a good knife, and clothes which are comfortable, warm, and dull colors will do you just fine. I've seen lots of people get hung up on having the latest and greatest gear only to realize it wasn't for them. Ease into the gear. After one season, you'll know what you need.

wyohome
December 10, 2013, 09:25 PM
I have been on hunting trips since 1958. I have never bought a piece of camo, although I own some free stuff that hunters have given me as they progress into the latest style. Lack of movement and clothes that are not solid anything, makes a difference. I have never used scent killer, but do hang my outer clothing somewhere away from cooking or fuel smells.

AKElroy
December 11, 2013, 04:58 PM
^^^ Oh, how I wish this never happened. This is how people get killed in the woods. A 'Sound' shot is when someone hears a sound and shoots in that direction. I didn't think it really happened until I read an article about someone getting killed as a result of one. So do yourself a favor and take Wolfgang's advice. If you hear someone talking about taking a 'sound' shot, hunt somewhere else.

I cannot even imagine this happening. My son and I will sit and carefully evaluate a deer before even considering a shot, and that clearly assumes we know it is a deer we are looking at. Who wants to drag a 40lb doe or button buck back to camp? To say nothing of the incredible danger this places others in.

Shooting at noise? Seriously? Just crazy. Some people need the 4 laws of gun safety tatted on their eyelids. People, even "potential" ones, are not a safe direction in which to be pointing a muzzle. "Noise" is not exactly knowing ones target and what's beyond it.

longknife12
December 11, 2013, 05:28 PM
I'd suggest a hunter safety course! Next, try to find a buddy that hunts and see if you can get a 'tagalong' trip. The other posts are very valid.
Dan

Skyshot
December 11, 2013, 10:03 PM
Well, you certainly don't need camo, earth tone clothes will work fine. An army surplus store will have cheap BDU's they work great. The one thing that I would recommend getting as good a quality as you can is, boots. Cold feet can end a hunt quickly. When you go through the hunter safety course, you'll find many people that will help you. Ask questions if your not sure about things. Be safe and good luck.

1911 guy
December 12, 2013, 02:06 AM
I lived in Virginia for a while. Unless you're hunting soybean fields, the binoculars can wait.

Your shotgun will do just fine. Camo not needed. Buy several brands of slugs, find out which your shotgun likes.

Get a good hunting vest. A cloth one with pockets, not a cheap vinyl thing. Make it hunter orange. Useful for deer hunting and small game hunting.

Buy good boots. As mentioned, cold feet make hunting miserable. Cold, wet feet end up frost bit.

A small pack to carry things in. These things should include: Compass (learn how to use it. Properly.), Bic lighter (the cheaper Cricket brand doesn't last in storage), Few handfuls of toilet paper (you'll thank me later), spare knife, fifteen to twenty feet of 550 cord (parachute riser cord), small flashlight (change batteries beginning of every season), and a whistle.

Every time you go out, put a snack, bottle of water and couple extra rounds of ammunition in the bag. Everything i listed takes up very little room. I carry mine in a fleece fanny pack.

Now about knives. Most folks get a knife WAY too big. A two inch blade will skin squirrels and rabbits, and gut and skin a deer. I prefer fixed blade, but a solid folder will work just fine. The spare I keep in my pack is a folder.

Don't buy a tree stand yet. First, nobody expects a beginner to have everything. Secondly, you don't know if you'll prefer hunting from a stand or the ground.

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