Swaging? Why swaging?


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Katitmail
December 9, 2013, 08:22 PM
J/k, I understand why. Wanted to ask if it's OK or I do something wrong by priming crimped brass?

I load range brass, never know what you pickup and I don't sort/check. I've seen some military brass for sure (with paint around primer). When I load on xl 650 progressive sometimes I get hard to seat primer but it does seat and they all work for me (9mm).

So, if I get crimped brass here and there, is there anything bad with me just loading it as normal, maybe seating primer little harder?

P.S. I understand if you buy military brass in bulk and know what it is. But I'm talking about random pieces.

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rcmodel
December 9, 2013, 08:31 PM
Yes.

A crimped primer pocket can, or will, require crushing the new primer to get it back past the crimp during seating.

That can or will crush and break up the sealed primer compound pellet inside the primer, and can dislodge the anvil in the cup.

That can or will lead to over-sensitive primers and doubling in an AR-15.

Or slam-fires when chambering a new round.

If you have crimped cases in the mix?

Do it right and sort them out and fix them before reloading them!!

PS: About now there will be several posts that say they never swage or ream crimped primer pockets and I am full of it.

But I can assure you I am not full of it.
BTDT in 1971!

rc

sellersm
December 9, 2013, 08:43 PM
What rcmodel said... Fix 'em first.

fallout mike
December 9, 2013, 08:50 PM
I sort them out and fix them first as well.

4895
December 9, 2013, 08:51 PM
I have seated a small pistol primer in a 9mm case that was crimped but the primer seated with difficulty and was somewhat disfigured upon inspection. I wasn't paying attention to some range brass I was reloading on a progressive and it stopped everything. I did set it aside and it did shoot fine at the range but as RC stated "can/will/maybe" does show up from time to time and Murphy's Law favors the foolish.

Since then, I have sorted by brass by headstamp/crimps/etc. before I load a batch of anything. It is time well spent to know you have a batch of brass that has had a good visual inspection and the same head stamp for consistency. Then I can turn on the radio and jam out 2 or 300 rounds and feel better about the result. I also use a case gauge for semi-auto pistol brass and out of a batch of 100 probably have 2 or 3 that go back for another crimp until they plunk. Probably due to case length differences but I double check anyway. YMMV.

Rule3
December 9, 2013, 09:33 PM
Just because they have red paint is not always an indication it is crimped (it may be). SB brass has the red sealant, their primer pockets are very tight but not crimped in the 9mm.

Regardless, after you deprime the brass you can clearly see the small thin edge of the crimp. Yes, as others said it needs to be removed.

No, you do not need a expensive swagging tool like the Dillon or RCBS you can cut them out or ream them out, If only a few you can do it by hand, If many attach it to a drill and a few turns and its done.

I use this a lot, it works for large and small primer pockets.

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/804809/hornady-primer-pocket-reamer-package?cm_vc=subv1253550

gahunter12
December 9, 2013, 09:55 PM
I sort my .223/.556 brass out by head stamp, and Swage them in lots. As for my pistol brass...I sort out the crimp primers (I get a lot of Fed NT .40s&w now days) and Swage them once I get 100 or so.

I use to sort pistol brass by head stamp, then got out of the habit about 3 yrs ago when I started shooting IDPA. I would go to a match with 200 rnds loaded in Winchester brass, and come home with a mixture of everything. I have since started sorting by head stamp since I pick up a lot of NT brass, Amerc, and Brass from Ga Arms.

higgite
December 9, 2013, 10:47 PM
Huh, I never considered not fixing them. I learned it was part of the process of reloading mil brass. And, I'm not a big fan of "forcing" a primer to do anything it shows reluctance to do. If I was in that big a hurry, I'd just buy non-crimped brass or factory ammo. ymmv

Potatohead
December 10, 2013, 02:21 PM
I didn't even know you could force them. Sounds dangerous.

Katitmail
December 10, 2013, 02:30 PM
Not really forcing. Once in a while I seat primer, it doesn't go in smooth. I take case out, inspect and see that it was crimped. But primer goes in nicely.

Yes, maybe compound get's cracked and maybe it's not going to fire.

Next time I will see those I will separate those bullets and see how they work. So far I didn't have any issues.

My loading is a lot of pistol rounds. Sorting brass is like... Let's just say I have enough time in separating brass I pickup. I also visually inspect in bulk when it's clean after SS tumbpler.

Or maybe I will just throw those away, it's usually very little amount.

RDA 226sig
December 10, 2013, 06:23 PM
In 45 ACP brass the XL650 will absolutely crush a primer when it is forced into a crimped pocket. Have Proven this. The small pistol primers, 9mm, are dimensionally more stable but are still deformed. I agree with RCModel. Sort and correct.

Rule3
December 10, 2013, 06:36 PM
Not really forcing. Once in a while I seat primer, it doesn't go in smooth. I take case out, inspect and see that it was crimped. But primer goes in nicely.

Yes, maybe compound get's cracked and maybe it's not going to fire.

Next time I will see those I will separate those bullets and see how they work. So far I didn't have any issues.

My loading is a lot of pistol rounds. Sorting brass is like... Let's just say I have enough time in separating brass I pickup. I also visually inspect in bulk when it's clean after SS tumbpler.

Or maybe I will just throw those away, it's usually very little amount.

I also depends on what primers you are using. Soft primers like Federal or even Winchester will maybe slide in a crimped pocket easier than Wolf or CCI.

Bottom line, the correct and safe thing to do is remove the crimp regardless of the method you use. The least that will happen is it will scare the hell out of you, the worst is a chain fire or an eye injury when one detonates.

1SOW
December 11, 2013, 02:20 AM
I use a Hornady reamer "bit". I made a simple jig on a small drill press (Harbor freight cheapy), pop the brass on a post and pull the handle---done. I keep 3000 or so WCC NATO on hand.
All seat smoothly and no primers get distorted or ruined. I don't bother with other crimped headstamps.
I started doing it when suddenly a LOT of WCC brass started showing up at the local ranges.

GLOOB
December 11, 2013, 03:49 AM
Or maybe I will just throw those away, it's usually very little amount.
If there are just a few, you can certainly toss them as you find them. But what I do is just stop and put a chamfer bit in my cordless drill. Set it near the press. When a primer doesn't start in the pocket easy like it's supposed to, I pull the case and ream it right there. Put it back in and carry on. Sometimes it's just a tight pocket. I ream the entrance of the pocket anyway, so it doesn't give me another false alarm.

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