Anyone know if Colt is bringing back the Python?


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CaptainKgun
December 11, 2013, 10:31 PM
As title says........

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ColtPythonElite
December 11, 2013, 10:41 PM
No....

VA27
December 11, 2013, 10:49 PM
I wouldn't give up drinking water waiting on that to happen. And even if by some miracle they did, it wouldn't be the same gun. They might call it a Python (or Python II), but it would be a 'product improved' gun, designed to be CNC'd, MIM'd or even printed.

You think used Pythons are high priced? A new one, manufactured in the same manner as the old one's, would make used prices look cheap. Best to just bite the bullet (so to speak) and pay the price for one now. They won't get any cheaper, and you'll have one while you're waiting.

HexHead
December 11, 2013, 10:49 PM
HAHAHAHAHA! Don't hold your breath.

If you want a Python, just suck it up and buy one. It'll never happen. Even if they released a DA revolver that looked like a Python and was called one, it wouldn't be a real Python.

pendennis
December 11, 2013, 10:54 PM
The allure of the Python is the hand fitted action, and the near-perfect metal finishing followed by that deep Royal Blue or Nickel finish.

The folks that did those jobs are retired, or on to other jobs. The equipment used is long retired. The only ones left are those which do the repairs, and the parts and knowledge is diminishing rapidly.

Even modern CNC machinery can't quite match the hand fit.

herrwalther
December 11, 2013, 11:08 PM
IF and that is a big IF, it would be right around now. The Colt Python is the signature sidearm on the popular "Walking Dead" show, so now there must be a renewed interest in it :D

gspn
December 11, 2013, 11:39 PM
They might call it a Python (or Python II)

Reminds me of the Ford Mustang II...I cringe.

Ky Larry
December 12, 2013, 12:00 AM
It's a good thing they don't build 'em like they used to. If they did, we couldn't afford 'em.

zoom6zoom
December 12, 2013, 12:42 AM
They no longer have anyone with the skills that were needed to make the originals.

Although I wish Colt had made a small lady's revolver called the Garter Snake.

DPris
December 12, 2013, 02:58 AM
Absolutely, emphatically- no.
Denis

22-rimfire
December 12, 2013, 08:47 AM
NO. Why would Colt do that even if they could? The cost would exceed the market price.

rodinal220
December 12, 2013, 10:02 AM
Probably not,but it is a doable project. Yes the gun would be expensive(but not gold plated) Colt meant high quality and a premium product at one time,not me too.

With todays machine tool revolution making things out of forgings and bar stock isn't really cost prohibitive. I remember some years back the very same question being posed about the Winchester pre-64 rifle....now they are back (FN-USA)and better than ever IMHO.....and affordable for many.

I remember some gun scribe for one of the pablum gun rags saying the action alone would cost $10,000.00USD to make and could NEVER be done.

Colt has suffered from poor management for decades and has a unique and very awkward ownership structure,this has hurt them for decades. Colt is making "some" progress,slowly.

I know it has been claimed that they have a problem finding skilled workers and that their youngest employees are in their 50s. I know lots of unemployed machinists and struggling gunsmiths that could fill the bill.There IS plenty of talent out there if you want to find it.

The Python could be made as a custom shop item and sold for a reasonable price,not Ruger Blackhawk or Vaquero prices but if USFA made 1973 P frames a little cheaper and better(IMHO) why cant Colt or anyone else make the Python??

pendennis
December 12, 2013, 10:50 AM
Probably not,but it is a doable project. Yes the gun would be expensive(but not gold plated) Colt meant high quality and a premium product at one time,not me too.

With todays machine tool revolution making things out of forgings and bar stock isn't really cost prohibitive. I remember some years back the very same question being posed about the Winchester pre-64 rifle....now they are back (FN-USA)and better than ever IMHO.....and affordable for many.

I remember some gun scribe for one of the pablum gun rags saying the action alone would cost $10,000.00USD to make and could NEVER be done.

Colt has suffered from poor management for decades and has a unique and very awkward ownership structure,this has hurt them for decades. Colt is making "some" progress,slowly.

I know it has been claimed that they have a problem finding skilled workers and that their youngest employees are in their 50s. I know lots of unemployed machinists and struggling gunsmiths that could fill the bill.There IS plenty of talent out there if you want to find it.

The Python could be made as a custom shop item and sold for a reasonable price,not Ruger Blackhawk or Vaquero prices but if USFA made 1973 P frames a little cheaper and better(IMHO) why cant Colt or anyone else make the Python??
At the risk of being repetitive, your posits have been noted by other posters.

Yes, modern CNC machining can get you close when manufacturing. But, "close" is not on the button, and it takes a long time and real talent to insure that all the parts mesh together as a Python.

U.S Firearms no longer manufactures the SAA clone.

Out-of-work machinists and gunsmiths are not automatic candidates to work in an established gun line such as the Python. The Python 'smiths were/are specialists of the highest degree.

The ability to build a Python is only part of the equation. Revolvers are not the majority of handgun manufacturing. Semi-autos of all ilk, vastly outsell wheel guns. While not a niche market, revolvers have a much smaller impact on the total handgun market. Why spend scarce research, engineering, and manufacturing resources on a product with such little impact on the overall bottom line?

Marketing a product like the Python would be extremely narrow. Guns would have to be built to order. I don't think Colt, or any other manufacturer would dare think that market penetration would be anything more than boutique in nature. If Colt thought for one second, that they could duplicate the Python of old, and create a new market, they would be gearing up production and sales right now.

km101
December 12, 2013, 10:55 AM
The biggest problem Colt would have in bringing back the Python would be that the new gun would always be compared with the old ones and would be found wanting. Even if the quality was good or as good. We all have a tendency to look back at the "old days" and judge newer products harshly. A new Python would not measure up in many peoples judgment , and if there WAS a perceivable flaw, Colt would be pounded mercilessly.

And this does not even take into consideration all the grief they would take over the price!

bikemutt
December 12, 2013, 12:20 PM
The biggest problem Colt would have in bringing back the Python would be that the new gun would always be compared with the old ones and would be found wanting. Even if the quality was good or as good. We all have a tendency to look back at the "old days" and judge newer products harshly. A new Python would not measure up in many peoples judgment , and if there WAS a perceivable flaw, Colt would be pounded mercilessly.

And this does not even take into consideration all the grief they would take over the price!
Right on.

I think S&W has a hard time with their new line of "Classic" revolvers, I've seen specimens sitting under glass for over a year now. I tried hard to convince myself to by one but just couldn't feel the love like I do when I handle a real classic.

hatt
December 12, 2013, 12:42 PM
S&W's problem with their classic line is the lawyer hole in the side. Not classic at all. You're turning off the very people you're targeting. Too many Smiths on the used market to pull that off.

I could see some interest in modern Colt revolvers. Put me down for a new dick special and .45 Colt Anaconda.

Jim Watson
December 12, 2013, 01:13 PM
They might call it a Python (or Python II), but it would be a 'product improved' gun, designed to be CNC'd, MIM'd or even printed.


There has already been a Python Mk III on the 1969 Trooper Mk III coil spring action but with Royal Blue and vent rib. It was really quite a nice looking gun, but even then they seemed to realize it would not sell well with the original to compare to.
One of our posters here has shown a couple of the few that were made.

Your only shot at a DA Colt is a resumption of the Mk V family, King Cobra and Anaconda types. And that not a very good chance.

Old Fuff
December 12, 2013, 02:32 PM
Want a shocker!! :what:

Go to the link:

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?p=9243992#post9243992

RealGun
December 12, 2013, 04:53 PM
Chuckle...there would be a whole culture built around why the old ones are the only ones worth having.:cool:

Wishoot
December 12, 2013, 04:56 PM
Chuckle...there would be a whole culture built around why the old ones are the only ones worth having.:cool:
^
Very true.

CraigC
December 12, 2013, 05:01 PM
Problem with the USFA reference is that they did not charge near enough. Their guns were head and shoulders above Colt but too many people remain starry eyed about the Colt name. Without regard for the product it's stamped on. Too much "if I'm paying $1200, I'm buying a Colt". The fact that the USFA was a better gun in every way and more true to the original SAA was irrelevant. Didn't matter that the Colt was really a $600 gun and the USFA a $2000 gun, it didn't have those magical letters stamped on the barrel or that stupid horse. . Maybe Colt could pull it off, since they can stamp a dog turd with "C-O-L-T" and people will buy them. :p

That said, the newer SAA's and New Frontiers are excellent sixguns, just still not as good as a USFA.

Seven High
December 12, 2013, 07:06 PM
Perhaps Colt could contract Miroku in Japan to produce the Python again at lower cost.

351 WINCHESTER
December 12, 2013, 07:35 PM
The new CNC Python. It's perfect and only $3,500. US.

Hickok44
December 13, 2013, 10:42 AM
My question is.......... Who in there right mind would pay the $$$ for one. I am sure there are people out there that would pony up the several thousands of dollars for one, but really..... Who would pay the kind of dollars for a safe queen gun. I am sure the majority of Pythons are setting in safes.

scythefwd
December 13, 2013, 10:46 AM
If you want a revolver built to that standard but today.. look up Korth.. and no, I cant afford to even look at them

CraigC
December 13, 2013, 10:53 AM
I'd rather have an older 586 or 27 any day of the week.

ColtPythonElite
December 13, 2013, 10:54 AM
There are still plenty of NIB Pythons out there. Sure they are pricey, but they are currently a better investment than the stock market.

wow6599
December 13, 2013, 05:33 PM
It's a good thing they don't build 'em like they used to. If they did, we couldn't afford 'em.

Folks drop crazy money on 1911's that aren't "worth" the $$ (IMHO).

I think there is a bigger market than others do for a HIGH quality, American made revolver.

Look at the people who spend $1000 - $4000 on 1911's from Springfield, Colt, Brown, Baer, Wesson (CZ), Nighthawk, etc.

$2000 for a new Python? Sure.

OrangePwrx9
December 13, 2013, 08:47 PM
Such crap in this thread.

Why should Colt make a Python? It was overrated to begin with. It would suffer in comparison to a good 686 and cost more to make. If more people had them it would become quite apparent.

I bought one new over 30 years ago. Still own it. Still trying to understand what the big deal is. Yeah, it looks mean, so what?

Good gun, yes; but it's not my favorite by any means. My Security Six and my 686 are the favorites and are better shooters. The Python became a safe queen once I mastered the Security Six.

DPris
December 13, 2013, 09:00 PM
Wow,
You make the very common comparison to high-end 1911s.
It's totally invalid, very simply because there's a sustainable MARKET for high-end 1911s.
There isn't for a $2000 revolver.
Denis

Jaymo
December 13, 2013, 09:04 PM
As much as I love the Python, I'll settle for my 586.
Or, my Dan Wesson.
Or my 15-3. As nice as it is, I can still shoot it without feeling bad about it.

tark
December 13, 2013, 09:05 PM
Ive seen and handled plenty of Korth's at the shot show Compared to a Python, they are somewhat....lacking. I have seen them with visible machining marks, and ill fitting grips. They are ugly. They have smooth actions, but they do not measure up to a Python. That is not a put-down, as NOTHING measures up to a Python in that respect. For the price of a new one, you could ger a very nice used Python. Guess which one I would take.....

tark
December 13, 2013, 09:06 PM
to be fair, I must admit I have never fired one

hq
December 14, 2013, 08:58 AM
I am sure the majority of Pythons are setting in safes.

Sad but true. I bought one of the very last royal blue Pythons new, took it to the range a couple of times, thoroughly enjoyed it... and decided that it's far too nice to be carried as a backup gun on hunting trips. Into the safe it went and got replaced by a cheaper 686-2.

...which just might be replaced by a new, precision CNC-machined stainless Python, if such a thing existed. Even though I have a number of 'smiths, I still believe the cylinder should rotate clockwise. :D

CraigC
December 14, 2013, 09:04 AM
Apparently there are a LOT more people who'll spend $2000 on a 1911 or AR than on a revolver.

22-rimfire
December 14, 2013, 09:19 AM
There really aren't A LOT of people who will spend $2000 for a customized 1911. It is a very limited market. Very few would spend $2000 for a new Python no matter how you want to gift wrap the concept.

CraigC
December 14, 2013, 10:25 AM
Well, there are definitely A LOT more $2000 1911's on the market than revolvers. The only production revolvers I know of that hit $2000 come from Freedom Arms. There are plenty of gunsmiths building custom revolvers full time but all told, it's probably not more than 100-200 guns a year. Most of those are probably well under $2000 as well. I have five and four of them are under $1500.

wow6599
December 14, 2013, 11:13 AM
Wow,
You make the very common comparison to high-end 1911s.
It's totally invalid, very simply because there's a sustainable MARKET for high-end 1911s.

I respect your opinion, but disagree. If Colt hadn't stopped production a year after the '94 AWB (and the Anaconda a few years later), who really knows where Colt revolvers would be in the hearts and collections of folks today.

Just look at the $$ S&W gets for some of its revolvers, and those aren't all they're cracked-up to be. Not always a decent fit / finish, 2 or 3 piece barrels, a lot of MIM parts, and the IL with a hole that would destroy the beauty of any firearm. And people still drop down hard earned money for them.

When I see folks at the range with their $1800 ACOG scopes, just dreaming about keeping their family safe from paper zombies, I have to believe there are enough people out there to make Colt money on a new Python. Just my opinion.

DPris
December 14, 2013, 01:32 PM
Wow,
Colt stopped production on those guns because they weren't selling then.
What on earth makes you think they would now, at a much higher price, when the tactical market (as you noted yourself) rules?

There's sufficient market to keep Wilson, Baer, Brown, and others happily selling $2000+ 1911s year in & year out.
If there'd been an equivalent market for $2000+ revolvers (a SUSTAINABLE market), don't you think Colt would still be making them?
Colt knows very well there isn't & they couldn't make any money off 'em.

Denis

wow6599
December 14, 2013, 03:36 PM
Wow,
Colt stopped production on those guns because they weren't selling then.
What on earth makes you think they would now, at a much higher price, when the tactical market (as you noted yourself) rules?

I understand your point of view, but I just think differently.

Back when Colt ('95 or '96) stopped production of the Python, there was a recent game changer to the handgun world - Glock. About a decade before the demise of Colt's revolver production, Glock came on to the scene ( yes, I know about the Nylon 66, XP-100, VP70). This was big. Guns were made of steel. And wood. Revolutionary.

Suddenly the firearms that we knew were old; outdated. A revolver? That's what old men and small town cops used. We want a Glock 7!

So, companies like S&W and Colt see the writing on the wall and slow down production of certain guns to tool up for classics like the SIGMA or Colt 2000. The 1990's were not good for a lot of firearm companies due to boycotts, lawsuits, union strikes, new competition, military contracts, etc.. Lost in this were some of the finest firearms ever produced - 3rd Gen S&W autos and Colt revolvers.

And the '94 AWB is in full effect.

Here is where I get to my point - this time in history is exactly when Colt should have refocused on revolvers. People started becoming used to the ban, so if you only get 10 rds, why not a 1911? Sure, folks still bought a ton of the cheaper plastic guns, but there was a new interest by younger shooters in the 1911. Did this happen because every new shooter just had to have an 80 year old design? I don't think so.

You could still get a 1911, or build one, for MUCH cheaper than a 3rd gen S&W, so they did. And they fell in love with them. But out of this affair with 1911s came a wanting of more. Of better. So we end up with insanely priced 1911s today because a younger generation had exposure to them. Revolvers? IMHO, if Colt had managed to keep the Pythons and Anacondas in production (don't know all the frame sizes), maybe Ruger and S&W would have some competition today. People exposed to "cheaper" revolvers (like myself) over the years would naturally gravitate towards nicer ones. The "pinnacle" to some.

Maybe since we only had 10 rds back then a new generation would have asked to see that Python in the LGS instead of a Kimber.

Besides, Colt throws out SA revolvers through their custom shop. Can't do a DA one?

P5 Guy
December 14, 2013, 04:36 PM
If Colt made the Python now it would, most likely be more expensive than a KORTH.

DPris
December 14, 2013, 04:41 PM
Aside from what ifs, since you missed previous memos (:) ) I'll repeat it again.

The Peacemaker has been in production, with processes & outside vendors in place, for a long time. Several parts are outsourced.

Colt does not make more than 3 or 4 thousand Peacemakers a year, if that, makes little profit on the model, and only keeps the gun going at all because it's their iconic & most-identified flagship model. Their attorneys have advised them to drop the model, but they keep it on & that's why.

Colt had the opportunity to sell the Peacemaker to an outside investor about 15 years ago & declined, for the same reason.

Start-up costs on a new model (which is how the Python would have to be viewed) are considerable.
Colt still has the drawings, but not the old equipment. Those drawings would have to be converted to CNC pathways where applicable.
For smaller parts, drawings would have to be shopped around externally.

Not one single part of any gun Colt currently makes could be used in the Python.
That means establishing new outside vendor sources for many, and new internal processes for what Colt would do in-house.

The Python could not possibly sell in sufficient volume to justify buying new CNC & related production equipment, which means the gun would have to be split between insertion into existing production equipment, thereby slowing down current model deliveries (already griped about) even further, and final assembly & finishing by specially trained people (most likely in the Custom Shop).

Colt's Custom Shop is pretty much backlogged by one or two years already, they don't have enough people to produce the labor-intensive Python's action & polish in volume (CNC can't make that gun profitable). They can't keep up with what they've already got going.

Colt would have to hire new people, involving salary & benefit packages.
Colt would have to train new people, and you don't learn that old V-Spring action in a couple weeks, nor do you become a master polisher in a few months.

It'd take months to establish reliable small parts vendors capable of supplying things like hands (Colt's already out of those & hasn't ordered any in years), triggers & hammers, screws, rebound levers, etc.
Colt would have to spend thousands in buying those new parts to have on hand before production could commence.

Colt would have to create a physical parts inventory space, an accounting system, a tracking & flow system, and so on, for those parts.

All that for a gun that wouldn't sell in a high enough volume to even repay startup, much less bring in an ongoing profit.

It can't make money for the company, and much as people may hope, Colt's bottom line is that profit across the board is more important than satisfying a few (and I mean a few) fans' wish lists on a project that could only lose them money.

Denis

Jim K
December 14, 2013, 04:46 PM
Bring back the Python?

Take a reality pill. It is not going to happen.

Jim

Ky Larry
December 14, 2013, 05:49 PM
I suppose some people have safe queen Pythons that are NIB never fired for investments.I have a 6"Royal Blue Python made in 1963 and it goes to the range every time. If Colt made a new Python,maybe more folks would shoot them and let the safe queens sit around and appreciate.I guess it all comes down to price.

oneounceload
December 14, 2013, 06:03 PM
if colt made the python now it would, most likely be more expensive than a korth.

winner, winner, chicken dinner!

wow6599
December 14, 2013, 06:22 PM
If Colt made the Python now it would, most likely be more expensive than a KORTH.

What does a new, "base" Korth go for? $7000?

Dframe
December 14, 2013, 06:27 PM
There are probably people sitting around in dakened rooms hoarding their pythons. NOT ME. I shoot the hell out of mine. Thats what they were made for.
But No new pythons. Far too expensive to manufacture. Any new revolver from Colt will NOT be a python.

Vodoun da Vinci
December 14, 2013, 08:44 PM
Gaad Bless you, Dframe. My Father in Law had a Python and we shot the heck out of it. His son inherited it - we still shoot it.

Best revolver ever? Nahhh...no holy grail. But very, very nice. I wouldn't buy a new one at $$$$$$$$ and modern craftsmanship even if it happened. Which it won't.

There are plenty out there NIB if someone really has to have it.

VooDoo

ColtPythonElite
December 15, 2013, 02:06 AM
I shoot and hoard...

kvtcomdo
December 15, 2013, 07:05 PM
The allure of the Python is the hand fitted action, and the near-perfect metal finishing followed by that deep Royal Blue or Nickel finish.

The folks that did those jobs are retired, or on to other jobs. The equipment used is long retired. The only ones left are those which do the repairs, and the parts and knowledge is diminishing rapidly.

Even modern CNC machinery can't quite match the hand fit.
+1,000,000

Artisanship has been lost.

HankB
December 15, 2013, 11:57 PM
You can tell that the Python was the best revolver ever made by the fact that nearly all the top PPC competitors - the ones who'd spend ANYTHING for a winning edge - were using them.

Except they weren't.

In fact, the Python was RARE on the PPC circuit, which was dominated by S&W revolvers. Yes, PPC guns were heavily modified - but they were still nearly all S&W's. Next to nobody chose the Python, even if they had the extra money to buy one as a base revolver.

Despite good factory barrels, the "stacking" of the action in DA and timing issues that surfaced under hard use relegated the Python to negligible representation in competition - which pretty thoroughly undercuts assertions of the inherent superiority of the Python.

(As for the barrels - for a time, it was considered chic to take an S&W and fit it with a Python barrel - making something called either a Smolt or Smython. Many thought this improved accuracy - but note well: THE S&W ACTION WAS PREFERRED.)

HexHead
December 16, 2013, 08:28 AM
There are plenty of Pythons out there for people that want to buy them. Don't kid yourself thinking a "new one" would be either cheaper or better.

bikemutt
December 16, 2013, 08:50 AM
What moved away from being an avid Python admirer was the action itself. It felt good to me on paper but under fire the triggers all seemed to impart a "buzz" to my finger which cumulatively led to a feeling of numbness. My shooting partner felt same way about them.

Now the King Cobra is a different story; I think if Colt exhumed the Python name and fitted it with a KC/Anaconda action, I'd be very tempted.

"King Python" anyone? :)

ColtPythonElite
December 16, 2013, 11:43 AM
I would love to see the MKV action with a Python barrel screwed on it. I would buy in every barrel length and finish.

hq
December 16, 2013, 01:08 PM
I would love to see the MKV action with a Python barrel screwed on it.

A Colt Grizzly -type solution? That sounds the most likely combination if a new Colt revolver will ever reach mass production. There's little chance that it'll be called Python, which would undermine the cult status of old Pythons. Too bad that all target grips available for Trooper V / King Cobra / Anaconda are so massively ugly, I'd give my left one for perfect Python-style replica grips for my Anaconda...

DPris
December 16, 2013, 01:40 PM
To the greatest majority of those who know the Python, stamping the name on anything else would bring nothing but outrage.
To those of the younger generation who don't have a clue, the name would be no incentive to buy a lesser-built gun just because it said "Python" on a vented barrel.

Any new Colt DA revolver will be built to be competitive with Ruger, Smith, and Taurus.
Consider what that means: serviceable, but not Python grade.

In other words, mass-produced by current methods, and those include casting, stamping & MIM.
That in itself would not necessarily doom a new Colt DA, IF it was well-designed, well-made, decently accurate, reasonably durable, and affordable to sell in sufficient volume.
Denis

ColtPythonElite
December 16, 2013, 04:21 PM
They could call it Python II and I'd be happy.

Dframe
December 16, 2013, 05:03 PM
Me too. I'd love to see something like the king Cobra with a vent rib barrel and premium finish. Python II has a nice ring to it.

dfariswheel
December 16, 2013, 08:20 PM
It's already been done.....Twice.

There was a prototype "Python II" using a Trooper Mark III action fitted with a Python barrel. The prototype was sold at the big Colt auction a few years ago.

There was also the Colt Boa, a Trooper Mark V fitted with a Python barrel and given Colt's Royal Blue job.

The Boa was made for and sold exclusively by Lew Horton Distributing.
It was made in 4" and 6" barrels and in sets of both barrel lengths in a case.
Production was very limited.

ColtPythonElite
December 17, 2013, 02:32 AM
Too bad that all target grips available for Trooper V / King Cobra / Anaconda are so massively ugly, I'd give my left one for perfect Python-style replica grips for my Anaconda...
Something like this?

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=146556&d=1312162280

hq
December 17, 2013, 08:20 AM
Something like this?

Exactly. Last time I saw that photo here I almost fell off my chair and was SO disappointed when I heard that it was just a mock-up with non-fitting grips. I even ordered a pair of what was supposed to be the same shape from gungrip.com, only to realize that not only they weren't, the build quality was abysmal.

Still looking. Python with target grips is IMO the most beautiful, classic DA revolver ever made and I'd love to have the same overall appearance on my Anaconda. Target grips are also far more comfortable to my hands than rubber grips, every time I shoot a couple of dozen of my hunting loads at the range I feel I a "COLT" imprint being hammered on the palm of my hand.

valnar
December 17, 2013, 12:48 PM
I'm more interested in seeing what that Colt Python goes for on The Walking Dead once the show ends. I could see it ending up on an episode of Pawn Stars.

Jim Watson
December 17, 2013, 01:11 PM
You can tell that the Python was the best revolver ever made by the fact that nearly all the top PPC competitors - the ones who'd spend ANYTHING for a winning edge - were using them.

Except they weren't.

In fact, the Python was RARE on the PPC circuit, which was dominated by S&W revolvers. Yes, PPC guns were heavily modified - but they were still nearly all S&W's. Next to nobody chose the Python, even if they had the extra money to buy one as a base revolver.

Despite good factory barrels, the "stacking" of the action in DA and timing issues that surfaced under hard use relegated the Python to negligible representation in competition - which pretty thoroughly undercuts assertions of the inherent superiority of the Python.


I was a PPC shooter in the 1970s and I shot a Python. But then I wasn't a TOP competitor.
I got the Python because it had a heavier barrel than a stock K38 and one Python was less expensive than a bull barreled and ribbed M10 "1500" gun plus an M14 for Distinguished.
It had just enough range of sight adjustment for a neck hold at 50 yards.
Mine was tuned at the Colt Custom Shop either by or under the supervision of Don Tedford. One of the guys here was kind of an advanced amateur gunsmith. He studied mine and replicated the modifications for himself and the other two shooters on the county pistol team. Frankly, his were better than my CCS because he was not punching a time clock and could tinker with the gun until he got it to suit himself.

Much later, I swapped a seldom used foreign automatic for a 4" Python which I sent to Reeves Jungkind to set up for IDPA. His action was heavier than the CCS or the local copy but then it does not require Federal primers like the really soft actions, either.


If I had it to do over now, it would be S&W all the way. The 686 has near enough the same balance as a Python and Smith smiths can now equal or beat even a tuned Colt action.

And the Colt action must be tuned. I do not know what the people who rave about the action of a stock Python are talking about. It is reasonably smooth but not particularly light and stacks like mad. One of the main functions of the expensive Colt action job is to get out the stacking so you can pull through the double action.
Jerry Moran was supposed to be the best in the business, but I was on his waiting list for several years and never got noticed, so I moved on and sold the NIB Python I had waiting on him. I heard he changed specialties away from revolvers.

I have never had any "timing issues" with my Pythons. One of the four hereabouts needed a new hand after several tens of thousands of rounds but that was about all.
I did have to replace the firing pin spring in mine, which got squashed with a lot of shooting and a good deal of dry fire practice. We found that half of the spring in an RCBS primer cup was a serviceable substitute for the factory part, and a lot easier to get.

DPris
December 17, 2013, 02:56 PM
Back in the mid-80s I worked with a guy who did use a Python for competition.
Fractured one hammer, had to have the gun rebuilt at least once.

With mild competition .38 loads, timing wear takes longer than a steady diet of full-bore magnum ammunition.
Denis

wow6599
January 8, 2014, 09:52 PM
Who knows, but for those who said "never".......

http://www.gunsholstersandgear.com/2013/10/22/colt-re-introduce-double-action-revolvers/


And thank you beeenbag for posting this.

http://www.thehighroad.org/showpost.php?p=9287297&postcount=1

DPris
January 9, 2014, 02:27 AM
As noted in the related post, no new DA revolvers at SHOT next week.

And, Colt has been "talking" about DAs for several years years.
That does not mean it'll happen anytime soon, and a Python is about the last thing Colt would produce in that area if they did come out with a new DA.
Denis

rooter
January 9, 2014, 05:26 AM
Despite good factory barrels, the "stacking" of the action in DA and timing issues that surfaced under hard use relegated the Python to negligible representation in competition - which pretty thoroughly undercuts assertions of the inherent superiority of the Python.
+1

After having owned them, I could care less about them. Seems the only people paying through the nose for them are people who have never owned one and do not realize they are not magical. A well tuned Smith trumps a Python at half the cost.

hAkron
January 9, 2014, 07:32 AM
S&W has been releasing new versions of their best loved revolvers. Most recently the model 66 has made a comeback. The S&W online catalog currently lists over 100 revolvers (base modes and variations), obviously S&W believes that the revolver business is lurcitive. That's the good news.

The bad news is that S&W has been releasing new versions of their best loved revolvers. Some of them - the model 27 in particular - look like bad Chinese copies of the originals. In order to stay cost competitive, they need to automate as much as possible, and use cheaper materials wherever practical, otherwise they just can't make a competitive product. Not enough people would buy a $2,000 to $3,000 new production revolver that was only marginally better in function than say a Taurus or Charter arms that are 90% cheaper.

If Colt starts producing a new python as a standard catalog item, expect them to cut corners. The only other option would be if they made it a custom shop only item like the SAA (maybe I'm wrong on this fact) where they get the proper attention to detail, and expect to spend as much on it as your wife's engagement ring.

MrWhipple
January 10, 2014, 12:02 AM
The Python was special because of the people who manufactured and produced it. They were both machinists and enthusiasts and immigrant housewives looking for additional income for their families. Sadly these people are no more. They are a generation past and will never be again. Colt can produce another DA revolver but it will never, ever, ever, be built to the same level and I will always pass it over. The Python is best left in the past I would be disappointed if Colt raped it's history for a sequel.

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