have this old side by side shotgun


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deadeye dick
December 15, 2013, 11:28 AM
I have this old side by side that I bought in 1966. It Is a Victor Sarasqueta Imported by Stoeger arms. 12 guage double trigger, top tang auto saftey.I shot it a lot in the old days with paper reloads that I did myself. Mostly trap loads (71/2s) It's A Sterlingworth -2 model. It's cut checkering with a beavertail forend. I was told I cannot shoot steel or modern ammo because the barrels are soft. Is that true? Also anyone know what the value of this piece. Thanks to all in advance.

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oneounceload
December 15, 2013, 01:26 PM
If it was made in 66, it should be fine with standard modern loads but not necessarily with steel

Here are some for sale, see if any are yours:

http://search.gunsinternational.com/search_results.cfm?search_term=sarasqueta

clang
December 17, 2013, 03:26 PM
I wouldn't shoot steel in it if it doesn't have chrome lined barrels (which is probably the case with your gun).

Victor Sarasqueta made some fine SxSs and the last thing you want to do is loosen the ribs from shooting steel through it.

rcmodel
December 17, 2013, 03:37 PM
No steel shot in it!!

Period!

It was not made for it then.

rc

deadeye dick
December 18, 2013, 02:32 PM
Gotcha, Told to shoot molubdeum (not sure of the spelling) or lead only. Gun is 98% Paid 150.00 in 66. Never thought it would be worth as much as it is. Got to find out what model it is. Nothing written on the gun or on the proof sheet. It's ritten in Spanish. All it says is Sterlingworth roman numeral two.

StrawHat
December 18, 2013, 03:08 PM
No steel shot in it!!

Period!

It was not made for it then.

rc
rcmodel, Educate me please. Why not? The steel shot is ecased in a shot cup so it should not touch the barrel. Is the choke constriction too small for the non compressible steel shot?

rcmodel
December 18, 2013, 04:26 PM
A combination of things.

The muzzles on most better shotguns were thinner back then.
They used softer steel back then.
And those double-barrels are joined together by soft solder joints.

Steel shot cannot deform like softer lead shot when going through a choke.
So the choke can expand over time.
In certain models, shooting steel shot may cause a slight "ring bulge" just behind the muzzle where the choke starts.

That can crack the solder joints loose and the ribs & barrels will start separating.

rc

StrawHat
December 19, 2013, 07:41 AM
Thank you.

John3921
December 19, 2013, 08:05 PM
"Gotcha, Told to shoot molubdeum (not sure of the spelling) or lead only. Gun is 98% Paid 150.00 in 66. Never thought it would be worth as much as it is. Got to find out what model it is. Nothing written on the gun or on the proof sheet. It's ritten in Spanish. All it says is Sterlingworth roman numeral two."

Probably not Molybdenum, I assume they meant to say bismuth. Bismuth is a soft non-toxic shot. It is slightly less dense than lead, but it is more dense than steel. There are soft tungsten-matrix shot available as well (Nice shot for example is, I believe, a tungsten / polymer - matrix) Tungsten is unbelievably hard - but the shot is made by making a matrix of tungsten and a polymer - resulting in a soft pellet. There is also a tungsten-iron matrix shot - it is not soft you'll want to avoid it as well.

MCgunner
December 20, 2013, 10:18 AM
I have a Felix Sarasqueta circa 1971 that I retired for an old pump Mossberg labeled "Revelation M310" and a new Mossberg 500 barrel I picked up for 100 bucks when steel shot became mandatory in Texas. I have fired only a few steel through the old gun, won't subject it to that anymore. I treated this old gun pretty rough in the 70s riding in boats in salt marshes and banging around. It sure was pretty when I bought it. No parts anymore. Putting custom wood on it seems like a waste of money. I still take it out once in a while around the place, but it don't get used for hunting anymore. Besides, I bought it before I knew anything about fit and it beats me up. The wood is fit to tightly to shim. It is what it is, but lots of memories in it. It was my only shotgun at the time, but I have choices now. :D

But, to answer the question... NO, do NOT shoot steel through those thin barrels. You risk ring bulge and barrel separation if you put too many through it.

Oh, I paid the grand sum of 100 bucks for mine on a going out of business sale in Bryan, Texas at Cook's Discount. I was an Aggie freshman and really had to scrape for that money, but I wanted that thing as I was a duck/goose hunter. :D

deadeye dick
December 20, 2013, 03:44 PM
Yes I mean't bismuth, molibdum is a grease.(spelling sucks)
MC---If I'm not mistaken Felix and Victor are two different manufactures, but I will do more investigating. I love this old gun and probably won't sell it anyhoo. Rhanks for the input Howie

MCgunner
December 20, 2013, 07:15 PM
Yes I mean't bismuth, molibdum is a grease.(spelling sucks)
MC---If I'm not mistaken Felix and Victor are two different manufactures, but I will do more investigating. I love this old gun and probably won't sell it anyhoo. Rhanks for the input Howie

You're right. They were kinfolks somehow, I've read this. There was a third generally regarded as a lesser quality, IIRC, but Victor was by far held as the highest quality of the three. Felix was a good quality gun IMHO, though, for a working shotgun. The barrels are regulated like a friggin' double rifle, hit RIGHT SxS at 50 yards and dead on with slugs. The fit and finish was beautiful to MY eye when I got it, but the fore stock and mechanical thing that locks it to the barrel is flimsy and one cannot open this thing with vigor to many times or that part will bend...as I found out years back.

Anyway, I still have it and it's more of a keepsake than a hunting shotgun for me anymore. I would NEVER shoot steel in the gun.

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