Problem preparing vension


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J_McLeod
January 1, 2014, 11:49 PM
Went hunting for the first time last month and got a 2-3 year old buck. Unfortunately the bullet went through the guy and tore up a lot in there. We quartered it in the field, put it on ice and processed it all the next night, rinsing all the meat before wrapping it.

We cooked some of the meat tonight and to my wife and I just tasted like deer gut. Apparently no one else can taste it, because the dish was wiped out even without us. I'm looking for suggestions on how to get rid of the deer gut taste. Sauce works, but I'd like to try something else first.

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beeenbag
January 2, 2014, 12:06 AM
Soak it in salt water overnight in the fridge, works well for me.

788Ham
January 2, 2014, 12:50 AM
Good luck, getting one gut shot isn't easy to rectify !

junglejim70
January 2, 2014, 01:22 AM
We eat a lot of deer meat at my house. I've harvested 164 deer since I started hunting in 1973. I bought a meat grinder from cabela's and we grind everything but the backstrap up and use our seal-a-meal to put the burger in the freezer. We use the ground meat for chili, hamburgers, stews and spaghetti . I think the key to good deer meat is when you are cutting the meat off the bones try to use only the lean meat. Throw away the white fat because it will give the meat a wild taste. I never add fat to my burger.....As for the backstrap slice it thin and add salt and pepper and fry it for breakfast. Or you can cook the whole backstrap in the oven but season and wrap it in tinfoil where it won't dry out. By the way I've harvested 4 deer so far this season. I'll try to get 2 or 3 more before season closes.....

Lloyd Smale
January 2, 2014, 07:39 AM
my honest opinion is its probably in your head if nobody else noticed. I like junglejim shoot a bunch of deer every year and inevitably some get gut shot and all the meat that can be effected by the guts has membrames protecting it. Just make sure you rince it well with water and then cut the membrames off the meat and i dont see how it could be effected. I put all the venison i take in the freezer and dont label the gut shot ones and have never thought to myself this pack of meat tastes bad.

3212
January 2, 2014, 09:43 AM
Only bad tasting and smelling venison I've had was from a hunter who punctured the bladder while gutting.I'm careful to press on the bladder to empty it before proceeding with the field dressing.

buck460XVR
January 2, 2014, 11:19 AM
It's in your head or the deer was not properly processed. Venison has a different taste. Some like it, some do not. Even if the deer was gut shot and/or the content of the intestines, stomach and bladder opened and allowed to contact the meat. If the meat was rinsed and that meat allowed to contact those body fluids trimmed away, the taste should not remain. If any tainted meat is not removed and is ground with other meat, the whole batch of burger will be tainted. That same meat cut into steaks will be tainted most in the area of contamination. Meat allowed to hang to long or left in the field too long in warm weather will have a green sheen to the meat and smell foul when cooked. This may or may not affect the whole carcass. Meat that was allowed to warm too much when processed will mean some cuts will have this and some won't. Most folks do not like the taste of deer tallow. It has a lower melting point than beef and a strong flavor. Removing as much of this as you can before cooking or grinding generally improves the taste to most folks.

Patocazador
January 2, 2014, 12:05 PM
I've busted the bladder a couple of times while cleaning a deer. Just washed it off and it was fine. Salt water soaks take out a lot of the blood clots. When you're done, the meat is just fine.

Vol46
January 2, 2014, 05:35 PM
Be sure you trim as much of the fat, fascia ( the clear membrane around the muscles), tendons & nerves out of the meat as you can. You want the red muscle meat & not much else. Some cuts ( tenderloins, back straps, hams in that order) will be more tender & taste better.
Soak the meat overnight - or even for a couple of days - in the fridge in Wishbone Italian dressing. Use a marinader , turning every now & then, or a ziplock bag, but use enough dressing to cover the meat.
Do not over cook the meat - believe it or not, a little rare, so it is still moist, tender & juicy, will taste much better than overdone. Don't bury the meat in barbeque sauce, etc. when you cook it. You may develop a favorite sauce or a better marinade by experimenting with other ingredients over time, but it is pretty hard to beat good old Wishbone Italian dressing to start out. Just soak it for a day, season with a little salt, pepper, and maybe some Dales seasoning & throw it on a grill for 6 or 7 minutes or a George Foreman for 4 or 5 minutes.
The first deer I brought home back in the early 70s was not edible, & our dog didn't want it either - I've learned some since then.

Laphroaig
January 2, 2014, 06:10 PM
Here's a easy marinade that we use. I think it imparts a very nice taste to the meat, especially when we grill it (I think grilling can make some cuts dry).

1/2 cup of each of these 4 ingredients: Cooking oil, lemon juice, soy sauce, and Heinz catsup. Plus about 1 tsp. of minced garlic. Cover the meat and soak for a while.

Laphroaig

Skyshot
January 2, 2014, 06:36 PM
I'll echo what Vol46 said, cut all bluish white silver tissue away from the meat. My fav. cut is tenderloin/backstrap soaked in buttermilk overnight and quick fried in a pan with onions and butter. I stress quick fried, the meat needs to be rare.

epoletna
January 2, 2014, 06:47 PM
You've got a bunch of good suggestions, but I don't see the milk suggestion. I've never tried it, but I've heard soaking the meat in milk (in the refrigerator) for a few hours will take away any bad taste.

I have used the salad dressing marinade -- that works well.

Bottom line, though, is (I think) your meat tastes like guts because you know it was gut shot, not because the flavor is in the meat.

Also, did you hang it? best venison I"ve ever had was hung (in a cold room at 40 degrees f) for several days. You can do the same thing by keeping it in the refrigerator several days (well wrapped so it doesn't get freezer burn.

J_McLeod
January 2, 2014, 07:28 PM
Thanks for all the suggestions.

We didn't hang it. Rinsed it before freezing and before cooking.

My mother in law ate the leftover tonight, so it might just be us. This wasn't the first time we've made venison from this deer, but the first time it tasted bad. We made half with BBQ sauce and half with steak seasoning and the half with BBQ sauce tasted fine. So we'll try soaking it longer next time. Despite this, I'm looking forward to next season.

Edventures
January 2, 2014, 07:43 PM
put a roast in a roaster pan with lid add one can of coka cola , one can of cream of mushroom soup . cook for a couple hours at 275 - 300 .
I know it sounds odd but it will taste great .
make mash taters use your pan sauce to make a gravy.
I agree with a little salt water soak for a rince first.

Arkansas Paul
January 2, 2014, 09:34 PM
We do the saltwater soak too. It helps draw out the blood (at least that's what my dad always said when he soaked it overnight). It seems to do it. We've not had any extremely gamey tasting meat. Like has been mentioned, venison tastes different. I like it.

You've got a bunch of good suggestions, but I don't see the milk suggestion. I've never tried it, but I've heard soaking the meat in milk (in the refrigerator) for a few hours will take away any bad taste.

I don't know about taking out any gamey flavor, but I like to pound it out with a meat mallet and then soak in milk or buttermilk. Add a little Cavenders Greek Seasoning to the milk and soak for an hour or so. Dredge in flour with a little salt (the Greek seasoning in the milk adds saltiness, so don't overdo it) and a lot of ground black pepper and pan fry and man, its some kind of good.

Lloyd Smale
January 3, 2014, 08:02 AM
like was said if its truely gamey tasting either it wasnt trimmed correctly or its rotten. My advice is dont listen to anyone that claims you need to age venison. venison isnt marbled like beef and all aging does is AGE! Im sure ill get some flak for that statement but i put down over 50 deer a year and they go right home that night and are skinned and butchred the next morning and put right in the freezer. Ive never noticed any advantage at all to letting them hang.

herkyguy
January 3, 2014, 12:14 PM
While we're on the subject, I hang, skin, and field dress my deer in the woods. the guts come out fairly easily. then i start cutting. i take just about every bit of meat off the back legs and rump i can. i go for the backstraps after that. my land is far too brushy to shoot a deer anywhere but the vitals for an instant kill, but by doing so i tend to destroy the shoulders entirely and rarely can i salvage much meat from there. it all goes in a cooler with a bag of ice on top and i let it bleed for one night with the cooler plug pulled.

i've processed a few over the past two years myself and have not had the gamey taste, nor has my wife noticed it. when removing the guts, some spillage is going to happen no matter what, but i rinse each piece of meat before processing it.

lastly, my wife refuses to let me add pork or beef fat so i'll add a few cubed squares of cheddar cheese to help it all stay together. i do that for burgers and breakfast sausage with very good results. nice flavor as well.

i'll try the marinades mentioned above next year.

Texaszach
January 7, 2014, 09:41 AM
This thread just made me even hungrier....

oneounceload
January 7, 2014, 12:30 PM
Or you can cook the whole backstrap in the oven but season and wrap it in tinfoil

Or wrap it in a basketweave of bacon and cook in the oven...... :D

Bedsides salt water, soaking in milk or buttermilk will also lessen the "gamey" taste

buck460XVR
January 7, 2014, 02:15 PM
Other things I have discovered that contribute to "strong" or "gamey" tasting venison.

When allowed to hang after being skun, the meat when exposed to air will dry out and create what I call a rind on the outside. If this rind is not removed before processing it can negatively impact the taste of the game. This is when cut for steaks or when included with meat to be ground for hamburger. Most places that commercially process deer do not remove this because it is time consuming and not really needed when processing beef and pork. If your meat has been commercially processed you can still remove it from the steaks before cooking. This rind is also what makes venison round steaks "curl" when cooked. Nuttin' you can do about the burger tho. If the processor uses a band saw to cut steaks, the off flavor of the rind is passed on to the whole steak by the band saw blade. This contamination is not limited to the rind. Any feces, urine, blood or intestinal fluid on the outside of the meat will be carried in with the teeth of the blade and taint the meat. This does not have to come from your deer, but from remnants on the blade from the gut shot, poorly field dressed deer cut up before yours. The other problem when processors use a band saw for cutting steaks and chops in venison is the marrow inside the bone. This too has a very strong taste and can taint the flavor of the meat. If you have ever seen a white film on the surface of your processed chops and round steaks, you were looking at marrow put there by the band saw blade. Only way to prevent these problems is either finding a caring processor that de-bones and cut steaks by hand or by processing the deer yourself. I've found the latter to be the easiest and produces the best tasting venison.

Edventures
January 7, 2014, 03:21 PM
there are many reasons for ageing venison . Aging allows for the slow,controlled growth of natural bacterial organisms that break down tissue cells.
this imparts tenderness and enhances the flavor of the venison.
all of this needs to be done under controlled conditions .
perfect ageing is accomplished when the deer is hung with the hide on ,for a length of time ranging from four to eight days, at a tempiture ranging from 38 to 40 degree F with a relative humidity of 75 to 80% . this would be ideal.
just remember to not let it freeze or the process is ended ,or let the meat get over 50 DEGREES as the process is accelerated and spoilage can set in .
use of a thermometer thru the hide can help

BigBore44
January 7, 2014, 04:31 PM
Try filling a large cooler (or 2) 1/3 of the way with water. Add 1/4 cup lemon juice, handful of sea salt, and a 1/4 cup of apple cider vinegar. Stir and place meat in the cooler. Fill the rest of the way with ice. Leave over night or +12 hours. Removes "gaminess" and tenderizes. We use this on our deer and large 300-400 wild boars. Ever heard boars over 200-250 lbs aren't worth eating? Well when you prep them this way, they sure are. And the deer melts in your mouth.

Wolfgang james
January 7, 2014, 07:44 PM
I second the milk soak but I add about 8 dashes of red hot. You don't taste either in the finished product, I don't tell new people to my table what they are eating until they go for seconds. I also second the anti aging idea. I prefer to gut and hang ASAP then skin and quarter the next morning.

AKElroy
January 8, 2014, 10:52 PM
We cooked some of the meat tonight and to my wife and I just tasted like deer gut. Apparently no one else can taste it, because the dish was wiped out even without us. I'm looking for suggestions on how to get rid of the deer gut taste. Sauce works, but I'd like to try something else first.

Was your wife present when you cleaned and processed the meat? Whenever I process any animal, the smells are so strong and unique that everything I eat for a few days later has a flavor that mimics that smell. It is hard to explain, but let me relay an experience from just three weeks ago. I shot a medium sized boar cleanly, ear to ear. I got it back to camp, washed it with Dawn to kill the ticks, and got to work gutting and washing. Everything came out clean, no perforations anywhere, but boars have that particular smell.

With the animal hanging, I go inside the trailer to wash up and make make breakfast. Cooked up some biscuits and store-bought bacon. All I could taste and smell was that boar.

J_McLeod
January 8, 2014, 11:16 PM
Was your wife present when you cleaned and processed the meat? Whenever I process any animal, the smells are so strong and unique that everything I eat for a few days later has a flavor that mimics that smell. It is hard to explain, but let me relay an experience from just three weeks ago. I shot a medium sized boar cleanly, ear to ear. I got it back to camp, washed it with Dawn to kill the ticks, and got to work gutting and washing. Everything came out clean, no perforations anywhere, but boars have that particular smell.

With the animal hanging, I go inside the trailer to wash up and make make breakfast. Cooked up some biscuits and store-bought bacon. All I could taste and smell was that boar.
She was. We're prepared to accept that this might just be in our heads. The kids were in another room playing when we processed the deer, so they loved it.

Thanks all for the tips.

balderclev
January 12, 2014, 05:25 PM
Good venison is all about taking care of the meat from woods to frying pan.

Quarter the deer within 3 hours of killing it if the temp is under 50. No need to gut it in the field.

Put it in an ice chest and cover liberally with ice. Leave it there for 3-5 days draining the water and re-icing.

Cut the deer up. Slice the backstraps into ministeaks.

Separate the muscles on the hams removing all fat and silver tissue. There should be no connective tissue in the muscles when done.

Slice the 3 large muscles against the grain into steaks. You can save the large flat muscle for a roast if you want.

Save the inside loins intact for grilling or baking.

Cut the meat off the shoulders. That along with all the other meat not used for steaks or roasts should be chunked for stew or grinding.

Put all this in meat in brine and leave in the refrigerator for at least 2 days.

Package the steaks/roasts in freezer bags full of water same as you would do with fish. This will keep them fresh for 2-3 years.

Freeze the chunks you are going to grind without water. Thaw them out in an ice chest until they are almost thawed and then grind them. The stew meat should be frozen in water.

This is a lot of effort, but your venison will taste great.

When frying steaks, marinate them in sweetened condensed milk (I use Eagle Brand) for 2 days. It imparts a sweet flavor to them. If you want to tenderize the steaks, do it before marinating them. Do not tenderize them before freezing.

Jim

Lloyd Smale
January 15, 2014, 09:03 AM
Other things I have discovered that contribute to "strong" or "gamey" tasting venison.

When allowed to hang after being skun, the meat when exposed to air will dry out and create what I call a rind on the outside. If this rind is not removed before processing it can negatively impact the taste of the game. This is when cut for steaks or when included with meat to be ground for hamburger. Most places that commercially process deer do not remove this because it is time consuming and not really needed when processing beef and pork. If your meat has been commercially processed you can still remove it from the steaks before cooking. This rind is also what makes venison round steaks "curl" when cooked. Nuttin' you can do about the burger tho. If the processor uses a band saw to cut steaks, the off flavor of the rind is passed on to the whole steak by the band saw blade. This contamination is not limited to the rind. Any feces, urine, blood or intestinal fluid on the outside of the meat will be carried in with the teeth of the blade and taint the meat. This does not have to come from your deer, but from remnants on the blade from the gut shot, poorly field dressed deer cut up before yours. The other problem when processors use a band saw for cutting steaks and chops in venison is the marrow inside the bone. This too has a very strong taste and can taint the flavor of the meat. If you have ever seen a white film on the surface of your processed chops and round steaks, you were looking at marrow put there by the band saw blade. Only way to prevent these problems is either finding a caring processor that de-bones and cut steaks by hand or by processing the deer yourself. I've found the latter to be the easiest and produces the best tasting venison.

another good point here. Avoid butchers that use meat saws and cut up deer and dont bone it out first steaks cut with bone in them will never taste as good as boned meat will. Beef bones dont impart the bad flavor that venison bones and marrow do.

Laphroaig
January 15, 2014, 11:59 AM
Beef bones dont impart the bad flavor that venison bones and marrow do.

I'm not sure I totally agree. Sucking the marrow out of the bone is my favorite part of a deer steak.

What I will agree with is that processors might not clean their saws after cutting tainted meat. Processing your own is always best so you know what your getting. Otherwise you take your chances...

Laphroaig

Arkansas Paul
January 15, 2014, 01:26 PM
Jim, I process a deer much the same way you do right down to soaking it in salt water.
The only thing I don't do is the sweetened condensed milk, as I don't want to mask the venison flavor. I like to tenderize them, then soak in buttermilk with Cavenders Greek Seasoning, then bread and pan fry.

BTW, I finally got around to loading some .40 rounds with that SR4625 and Autocomp I got from you. Haven't had a chance to shoot them though. :)

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