Remember 1960's Gun Deals (Gun Shows, Mail Order, Dealers, & Individual)?


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Gun Master
January 4, 2014, 02:11 PM
My, how times have changed! It may be good to "remember" the differences (& share with those who don't), to renew our quest to resist oppressive gun restrictions, and perhaps have some old ones removed? I also know "the times" that have changed are not solely limited to "gun deals". We will not, and IMHO, should not, return entirely "to the good old days". If you'd like to, share some good gun dealings from the past (not limited to any certain period), but especially around the 1960's. Maybe we can have fun, and help improve our resolve to better the current situation, as best we can? I'll contribute later, if the thread is well accepted.:)

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StrawHat
January 4, 2014, 02:34 PM
I recall P08s went for $39 and P38s were $29. Through the mail, to your door.

1KPerDay
January 4, 2014, 02:38 PM
$213 in today's dollars for a P38... pretty dang good.

Gun Master
January 4, 2014, 04:36 PM
Here's one, (About 1959) Astra Model 400 9mm Largo, mail order for $25. Had to be picked up at the Railway Express. None of the following : background checks, waiting period, interstate limitations, or shipping to FFL. Also could buy from any individual or retailer, in any state - long guns and/or handguns, with no restrictions. Went to gun shows and trade shows in your own and non-resident states, and bought, sold, or traded all types of guns, without impunity . Mail order all types, all the time, from any state.:D

rule303
January 4, 2014, 05:10 PM
New in the cosmoline Norinco SKS's were $99, and Type 56 AK's were $200. Nobody wanted them because they were "cheap Chinese junk". That was the early 90's. I found a cheaper than dirt catalog from 2005 a few months ago, and steel cased Wolf .223 or 7.62x39 was $99/1,000. Never thought of 2005 as the good old days, but I guess compared to today maybe they were. As recently as the early 2000's you could find Enfields, Swiss K-31's, and various Mausers for around $100, plus plenty of cheap ammo to feed them.

tekarra
January 4, 2014, 05:43 PM
Those were the days!

JohnBT
January 4, 2014, 05:52 PM
Well, it was only BBs I wanted, not the 3rd degree.

It must have been '57 or '58 and I was in 3rd grade in MD. I had a school holiday and went with my folks to a small town in Virginia to visit family. My cousins had to go to school, so I walked the 5 blocks to the hobby/sports store on Main Street to buy BBs and model airplane cement.

The owner wanted to know why I wasn't in school and after I explained it he called my grandparents to check me out.

The BBs and cement weren't mentioned - they were okay - and model glue back then wasn't doctored and could be sniffed.

Starter52
January 4, 2014, 05:56 PM
I remember all the great deals back in the 1960's.

I also remember that I had zero money in those days, and was too young to buy anything even if I had the money. Which I didn't. :D

Leanwolf
January 4, 2014, 05:57 PM
In 1964 I bought a new S&W Combat Masterpiece (Model 15), .38 Spec. for $82.00, full retail price.

I think today that even used ones are a bit higher than that. ;)

L.W.

toiville2feathers
January 4, 2014, 07:00 PM
In 1959 I ordered Spring field A3-03 rifles from Montgomery Ward. When they came in I went uptown on my lunch hour and paid $19.00 for it, took it back to school and sporterised it in metal shop and woodshop. Kept it in my locker the whole time until I had completed the project. Had a couple of locker inspections when principal was looking for cigarettes. Didn't phase him the least that a rifle was there. When the project was complete I took it home on the bus. I built 3 rifles in high school.
Metal shop teacher taught us reloading during study hall if we wanted to do it. It usually lasted about 2 weeks Those 2 teachers gave a lot of students a life long recreation experience to enjoy and relax with for the rest of our lives.
We weren't a small school either, 183 in my graduating class. The lions share of us served in Vietnam and Laos, with only one casualty. A jeep fell on a class mate who worked in the motor pool. Even the classes that followed me experienced low casualties. If you hunted, you were allowed 2 excused abscences from school. When deer hunting came, the Friday before opening weekend and the Monday after school was closed. Just about everybody hunted something. We were even known on dates to take the girl friends shining jack rabbits. Taught them to run the light and if they could shoot,she was a winner. Great days those were. My first date with my wife (high school aquiantance) she stood me up because she was with here Dad and the walleyes started to bite at sunset. No problem I understood that. Couple dates later I took her coon hunting. She had a ball. I married her 2 years later, we have hunted together many times, She still enjoys going to the range with me and 48 years later we are still enjoying life together.

Gun Master
January 4, 2014, 07:16 PM
New in the cosmoline Norinco SKS's were $99, and Type 56 AK's were $200. Nobody wanted them because they were "cheap Chinese junk". That was the early 90's. I found a cheaper than dirt catalog from 2005 a few months ago, and steel cased Wolf .223 or 7.62x39 was $99/1,000. Never thought of 2005 as the good old days, but I guess compared to today maybe they were. As recently as the early 2000's you could find Enfields, Swiss K-31's, and various Mausers for around $100, plus plenty of cheap ammo to feed them.
After a lapse of several years of low gun activity (no money, 2 mortgages, 2 marriages & 2 college ed., 12 hr. work days, etc..), I jumped back into the gun market. In 1989 I bought a Norinco SKS NIB with all the goodies (flat blade bayonet, etc.) for $167. I couldn't believe a new semi-auto HPR for that low a price.:D

Gun Master
January 4, 2014, 07:26 PM
In 1959 I ordered Spring field A3-03 rifles from Montgomery Ward. When they came in I went uptown on my lunch hour and paid $19.00 for it, took it back to school and sporterised it in metal shop and woodshop. Kept it in my locker the whole time until I had completed the project. Had a couple of locker inspections when principal was looking for cigarettes. Didn't phase him the least that a rifle was there. When the project was complete I took it home on the bus. I built 3 rifles in high school.
Metal shop teacher taught us reloading during study hall if we wanted to do it. It usually lasted about 2 weeks Those 2 teachers gave a lot of students a life long recreation experience to enjoy and relax with for the rest of our lives.
We weren't a small school either, 183 in my graduating class. The lions share of us served in Vietnam and Laos, with only one casualty. A jeep fell on a class mate who worked in the motor pool. Even the classes that followed me experienced low casualties. If you hunted, you were allowed 2 excused abscences from school. When deer hunting came, the Friday before opening weekend and the Monday after school was closed. Just about everybody hunted something. We were even known on dates to take the girl friends shining jack rabbits. Taught them to run the light and if they could shoot,she was a winner. Great days those were. My first date with my wife (high school aquiantance) she stood me up because she was with here Dad and the walleyes started to bite at sunset. No problem I understood that. Couple dates later I took her coon hunting. She had a ball. I married her 2 years later, we have hunted together many times, She still enjoys going to the range with me and 48 years later we are still enjoying life together.
That may be the best story I've ever heard on THR!

Liberty1776
January 4, 2014, 07:30 PM
Gun Master - Wolf River, WI?

JohnBT
January 4, 2014, 07:55 PM
"We weren't a small school either, 183 in my graduating class"

Of the 18 high schools in my county, I graduated in the smallest class - 486. That was 1968 in Montgomery County MD - the D.C. 'burbs.

My father always encouraged me to work hard in school because he finished 2nd in his class. Of course, in 1938 the senior class of Red Hill High School south of Charlottesville only had 12 students. :)

Gun Master
January 4, 2014, 07:57 PM
Gun Master - Wolf River, WI?
No sir! West Tennessee, just a little bit farther south, "Thank you very much.":)

jimsouth
January 5, 2014, 09:11 AM
My, how times have changed! It may be good to "remember" the differences (& share with those who don't), to renew our quest to resist oppressive gun restrictions, and perhaps have some old ones removed? I also know "the times" that have changed are not solely limited to "gun deals". We will not, and IMHO, should not, return entirely "to the good old days". If you'd like to, share some good gun dealings from the past (not limited to any certain period), but especially around the 1960's. Maybe we can have fun, and help improve our resolve to better the current situation, as best we can? I'll contribute later, if the thread is well accepted.:)
I remember the old Herter's Catalogue.

jimsouth
January 5, 2014, 09:13 AM
After a lapse of several years of low gun activity (no money, 2 mortgages, 2 marriages & 2 college ed., 12 hr. work days, etc..), I jumped back into the gun market. In 1989 I bought a Norinco SKS NIB with all the goodies (flat blade bayonet, etc.) for $167. I couldn't believe a new semi-auto HPR for that low a price.:D
I still have some old NORINCO .223 ammunition. Shoots OK.

wally
January 5, 2014, 11:21 AM
Never thought of 2005 as the good old days, but I guess compared to today maybe they were.

Sad but true, fortunately I'm still shooting up a lot of the ammo I got back then.

Gun Master
January 5, 2014, 03:21 PM
I remember the old Herter's Catalogue.
I grew up on the Stoeger Catalog.

Esoxchaser
January 5, 2014, 03:30 PM
I remember looking at all the firearms that could be mail ordered in the Sears and Montgomery Wards catalogs. Popular Mechanics and Popular Science had ads in the back for all kinds of mail order Saturday Night Specials and surplus firearms.

rcmodel
January 5, 2014, 03:55 PM
http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j219/rcmodel/KTOG/oldadd.jpg

rc

Gun Master
January 5, 2014, 04:48 PM
Here's another one. My 1st autoloader was a DWM Luger .30 cal.(7.62mmLuger), in very good condition, all original matching parts, for $32.50 plus tax ,out the door. I was so poor that I couldn't take it "out the door" right away, and had to get it on lay away. Ou-weee ! Those were the days.:D

Gun Master
January 5, 2014, 04:59 PM
http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j219/rcmodel/KTOG/oldadd.jpg

rc
rc, I can read "April" , but I'd like to know the "year" of that wonderful catalog that you have there ?:)

Gun Master
January 5, 2014, 05:28 PM
After a lapse of several years of low gun activity (no money, 2 mortgages, 2 marriages & 2 college ed., 12 hr. work days, etc..), I jumped back into the gun market. In 1989 I bought a Norinco SKS NIB with all the goodies (flat blade bayonet, etc.) for $167. I couldn't believe a new semi-auto HPR for that low a price.:D
Also, at that same gun show, got my wife a diamond ring, ear rings and other pieces of jewelry and trinkets. Shortly before (or after), she received a mink coat from somebody who looked a lot like (and was) me. I would have gotten these for her, regardless, but still didn't make my four gun purchases look so bad either.:D

rswartsell
January 5, 2014, 06:51 PM
...and all I got were Sea Monkeys and X-Ray specs! What a wasted life.

arizona98tj
January 5, 2014, 07:29 PM
Early '70s, when I was in highschool, I refinished a couple of long guns in shop class, including hot bluing. They had tanks for the students who wanted to do that. The long guns were taken to and from school on the bus (we lived about 15 miles out in the country in Northern Minnesota). The only "concern" was from the bus driver, ensuring it was unloaded.

Now days, in school, if my grandson nibbles his poptart into something that might be interpreted as a firearm, he gets suspended. Convince me we haven't lost a LOT of our liberties in this country!

Gun Master
January 5, 2014, 07:44 PM
In the early '60's, I went to an out of town "Trade Day". I had an old Stevens 12 ga. double, that I was determined to trade for a suitable handgun. A "dealer", who was also out of town, had several handguns crammed into a metal basket. I spied a Walther P-38, and asked him how he would trade. He said he would take the Stevens and $5.00. I know my jaw must have dropped. What a great deal! But, I didn't even have $5. I showed him a 12" Bowie Knife, which I had bought for $5, and asked if he'd trade for the gun and knife? He accepted, and I know my jaw was dragging dirt again! I walked away with the P-38 (which I still have), and tried to keep that silly grin off my mug.:D

Gun Master
January 5, 2014, 07:50 PM
Early '70s, when I was in highschool, I refinished a couple of long guns in shop class, including hot bluing. They had tanks for the students who wanted to do that. The long guns were taken to and from school on the bus (we lived about 15 miles out in the country in Northern Minnesota). The only "concern" was from the bus driver, ensuring it was unloaded.

Now days, in school, if my grandson nibbles his poptart into something that might be interpreted as a firearm, he gets suspended. Convince me we haven't lost a LOT of our liberties in this country!
Amen ! See post #1.

Nanook
January 5, 2014, 09:13 PM
What an excellent thread! It was great to read all of the stories, but sad at the same time to see how much we have lost.

I remember an older friend of mine talking about hunting after school in what is now Oak Lawn IL right near the hospital. This would have been in the late '50s or early '60s. He had the rifle in his locker, and the principal looked it over and they talked about guns and hunting for a while.

Can you imagine that happening anywhere in this country these days? There would be a SWAT team in that story if it happened today.

Any members who live south of Chicago know how congested that area is nowadays. The hospital has taken all of the former open spaces and put buildings or parking lots on them.

The high school I went to at one time had a rifle team, and an archery team. By the time I got there in 1966, both had been discontinued. They were both in the catalog though. I may have made a different decision had I known that.

JohnBT
January 6, 2014, 08:05 AM
"1960's Gun Deals"

To keep them in perspective, in 1966 a 16-year-old starting at McDonalds was paid $1.15 an hour.
In '67 I got a tree service job as a groundman and spray truck helper at $2.35 plus time and a half overtime.

Working outside was so much better than hauling 100# bags of spuds up out the basement and making fries.

Seems like there was always a job available for the big kid. :)

19-3Ben
January 6, 2014, 08:23 AM
In 1964 I bought a new S&W Combat Masterpiece (Model 15), .38 Spec. for $82.00, full retail price.

I think today that even used ones are a bit higher than that.

L.W.

That really says more about inflation than it does about the great prices on guns. $82 in 1964 is the equivalent of $616.51 in 2013 based on two online inflation calculators I just used. That's not too far off from the price of new S&W revolvers today. Of course, if you want to talk about what you're getting for that amount of money it's a totally different issue.

Gun Master
January 6, 2014, 02:34 PM
At a gun show, I bought a Colt Frontier Scout .22LR (two tone), in good condition showing a little wear, two digit serial # @ approx. $57 range.:cool: I eventually converted to the Ruger Single Six, since I became convinced that it was superior to the Colt .22. Apparently others thought so too, since the CFS ceased production long ago, and the Ruger is still going in full swing mode. I've owned a couple of these over the years.

Landgroove
January 6, 2014, 02:56 PM
Another old ad

jimsouth
January 6, 2014, 03:54 PM
Herters did carry their own line of revolvers - don't know who manufactured them. I know I saw a nice .357 a while back. Anyone???

jimsouth
January 6, 2014, 03:59 PM
What an excellent thread! It was great to read all of the stories, but sad at the same time to see how much we have lost.

I remember an older friend of mine talking about hunting after school in what is now Oak Lawn IL right near the hospital. This would have been in the late '50s or early '60s. He had the rifle in his locker, and the principal looked it over and they talked about guns and hunting for a while.

Can you imagine that happening anywhere in this country these days? There would be a SWAT team in that story if it happened today.

Any members who live south of Chicago know how congested that area is nowadays. The hospital has taken all of the former open spaces and put buildings or parking lots on them.

The high school I went to at one time had a rifle team, and an archery team. By the time I got there in 1966, both had been discontinued. They were both in the catalog though. I may have made a different decision had I known that.
I remember barrels full of military surplus rifles "outside" the Army - Navy Store in Pottsville, Pa. Bought a Savage ( or a Stevens ?? ) over under turkey gun ( .44 mag on top - 12 gauge below ) for $60. at a Miller's Auto Supply. I guess the .44 mag was incase the frickin turkey was hiding behind a tree. I think of the turkey & the Sharps rifle in the first True Grit.

Gun Master
January 6, 2014, 05:54 PM
Herters did carry their own line of revolvers - don't know who manufactured them. I know I saw a nice .357 a while back. Anyone???
J.P. Sauer and Sohn of West Germany made their revolvers. They had other European companies to make their firearms, most notably BSA in England.

jimsouth
January 6, 2014, 06:48 PM
I know the in cosmoline 03 Springfields my dad bought after WW2 , were like $35. - $40. each. I can't imagine what one still in the crate would go for today.

Edventures
January 6, 2014, 07:44 PM
In a inner city High school there a shooting gallery in the basement of the main building. I didn't go to that school ,but have talked to a few men who took their cased rifles to school. They would leave them in their lockers till team practice.
How times have changed.It was a after school porgram.

tactikel
January 7, 2014, 01:33 AM
My middle school in the '60s had a gun range in the basement, long abandoned, apparently intended to teach boys to shoot for WWII :what:, I was fortunate to be born 8 years after VJ Day.

The last page on a guns and Ammo mag during the 60's had M1 carbines for $79 and M1 Garands for $89. Mailed to you door:neener:

rehorne
January 7, 2014, 02:02 PM
Anyone remember Bannermans. I thought that was the greatest gun dealer out there. I spent a lot of my burger flipping money there.

Archie
January 7, 2014, 05:23 PM
I cannot read Shotgun News anymore. I remember some of the great classified ads - one in particular from a gentleman I can no longer name, always announcing "... the finest example of Civil War cutlery ever..." and so forth.

The current Shotgun News (good luck to them) is just sad to peruse anymore.

And yes, I remember the Lugers for $40 and 'select' grades for $80. Not that I had $4.00 in those days.

Stevie-Ray
January 7, 2014, 06:51 PM
Well, if you can't remember, you can always re-read your copy of Unintended Consequences, and John will remind you through the ads he included.

Gun Master
January 9, 2014, 04:58 PM
Those ads of "Ye Olde Western Hunter" (Interarms- Alexanderia, Va.) were great ! GI .45's , Auto & revolvers, less than $30, etc. I can't do pics, so would enjoy those who can, Thanks:)

JohnBT
January 9, 2014, 10:02 PM
http://www.bavarianm1carbines.com/081967a.jpg

http://www.bavarianm1carbines.com/061966c.jpg

http://www.bavarianm1carbines.com/041965a.gif

http://www.bavarianm1carbines.com/031963d.gif

DF Smith
January 9, 2014, 10:24 PM
I remember working with my dad in the late 50s early 60s. He owned a surplus business that delt with rifles, jeeps, ect. We picked up a order of 600 springfield O3s in wooden crates, 400 Winchester/Remington Enfields, 200 mod. 97 Trench guns in crates. All sold for 25-35 dollars apiece. Military jeeps sold for 600-800. Most people did not want "that old junk" I wish I had ALL that old junk.

SC Shooter
January 10, 2014, 10:56 AM
In the early '60s, all Sporting and gun magazines would have ads for hand guns for less than $20. No name you were ever familiar with, and the only requirements was that had to be shipped pre-paid and by Railway Express. I also kept my hunting rifles in my college dorm room.

Speedo66
January 10, 2014, 11:52 AM
I remember 1911 style Star pistols selling for $30-40 in magazine ads, but nobody would ship anything to NYC. My first service pistol in 1969 was an S&W Mdl. 10 .38Spl. for $65, plus the nice dealer threw in a holster. Army-Navy stores like Models and Kaufmans in Manhattan had plenty of WWII rifles, including $11 BSA and $12 Carcanos, no restrictions on long gun ownership then.

Later deals included a $79 Norinco SKS, and later, an $89 one, and I was pissed the price had risen so much. Also $79 and $89 Swedish Mausers I bought, the latter being an M38 short rifle with the turned down bolt.

You went to a large HS? I graduated in 1964 from Francis Lewis HS in Queens NYC in a graduating class of 1,563, school total was approx. 5500. No, I'm not making this up. Trying out for a school team was like trying out for the pros. :D

Believe it or not, we actually had a rifle team.

loose noose
January 10, 2014, 02:36 PM
In 1958 I purchased my first brand new in the box Iver Johnson 20ga. single barrel shotgun for the princely sum of $25.00 from a local Army Navy Surplus store down the street from where I was growing up.

In 1962 I bought my first Ruger .22LR RST pistol for the very high price of $39.95 to check my trap lines, in N/E Wisconsin. Never required any check of any kind.

I'll say we've lost a lot of our liberties since then, and we will stand to lose a lot more if we don't wake up soon.

GEM
January 10, 2014, 04:52 PM
I remember when the FN M1900s were sold for next to nothing. I always wanted one but seeing I was a little kid - that didn't happen. I liked its weird looks.

tekarra
January 10, 2014, 06:05 PM
How naive we were not thinking that times would change!

km101
January 10, 2014, 06:58 PM
I think it was 1964 or thereabouts, that I bought a Ruger Bearcat .22 revolver. I was 16 at the time and had worked all summer @ .65 cents/hr to save up the $38 dollars that it cost. I handed the man behind the counter a $50 bill and he handed me the gun (NIB) with my receipt and my change. He asked me (after the exchange) if I was 21. I said "No, but I can go get my mom if you need to talk to her." He declined and I left with the pistol. I spent the summer cowboying on H.L. Hunt's (the richest man in the US at the time) place in E. Texas to earn the money.

I don't remember what a box of .22 shells cost back then, but I think a brick of them was about $3.00 lmore or less.

One of my friends had a couple of M-1 carbines that his dad had brought back from WWII, and milsurp ammo was so cheap that we often shot them instead of .22's. Those were the days!

788Ham
January 10, 2014, 11:45 PM
Post # 14, JohnBT, I graduated in '67 from a small high school outside of Denver, my class had 312 graduate.

One posted ^^^^, about buying .22 ammo for $3 a brick, thats about right. I remember buying them for 30 cents a box in town, makes the $3 right. I can also remember buying shot gun shells for $1.75 a box, not the best, but I didn't care, they went BOOM. My buddy and I used to go out on a Sat. morning with a brick of 22's each, when we came home, not a shell between us, sometimes we'd go get some more for the next weekend, before the "sale" went off. I was working in a pizzeria, $1.75 an hr. , this allowed me to go shoot when I wanted too, plus help buy gas for my buddies car, I didn't have a one, gas was 27 cents a gal.

Ron_Miami
January 17, 2014, 01:40 AM
About 1975 after MAC went bankrupt, .45 MAC10 SMGs were going for $42.50 ea. in lots of 100!

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