Dealing with different handgun loads


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weissensteinburg
January 7, 2014, 03:00 PM
I'm just starting to get serious about shooting better, and I've run into a problem with switching between different cartridges. The Fiocchi stuff I've been shooting lately is dead-on while other brands will shoot high for me, presumably because they are loaded hotter. It's not a huge deal when shooting large steel plates, but on the smaller ones it's making me miss. I'm not at a point where I can start doing hand-loading and the brand I buy is subject to availability. Is this something you all have experienced, and is there any good way to deal with it other than buy what I like in bulk when I can?

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ATLDave
January 7, 2014, 03:15 PM
Do you have adjustable sights? If so, you could note the appropriate adjustment for each cartridge.

But, ultimately, rolling your own is the solution. I put it off for years. Now I cannot imagine trying to keep myself in store-bought ammo.

weissensteinburg
January 7, 2014, 03:26 PM
They're stock XD sights, so just driftable left and right. I'd like to reload but really don't have the space for it in my apartment. I had considered bolting a press to a piece of board and clamping it down, but I'm not sure if my desk is stable enough and the kitchen table definitely isn't.

MrBorland
January 7, 2014, 03:40 PM
presumably because they are loaded hotter

Are the Fiocchi bullets lighter in mass than the others, by chance? With handguns, it's more a matter of bullet weight than velocity: Heavier bullets tend to hit higher. If you're going to shoot factory ammo, I'd try sticking with the same bullet weight.

weissensteinburg
January 7, 2014, 03:53 PM
Nope, they're all 115gr 9mm.

ny32182
January 13, 2014, 11:31 AM
You could get adjustable sights installed (probably want to do this anyway) and note relative adjustment positions for each load.

Better solution would be buy what you like in bulk.

Best solution is load your own.

earplug
January 13, 2014, 11:38 AM
I used to reload in a one room efficiency apartment.

All you need is a decent bench.

waktasz
January 13, 2014, 09:22 PM
Easiest thing to do is hit the range and learn your "dope".

I have adjustable sights but once they are set I never change them, even switching between major and minor loads. The difference isn't that significant.

chiltech500
January 15, 2014, 12:45 PM
had considered bolting a press to a piece of board and clamping it down, but I'm not sure if my desk is stable enough

I've seen photos of guys doing just that, and a standard desk should be stable enough as it doesn't require that much downward pressure - at least with my Dillon progressive.

Dillon makes a cheap progressive press if you will load only pistol caliber, mine is more expensive because it can load anything and is quickly changeable.

Like the gentleman said, once you reload you won't believe you used to buy ammo. Think about not running around finding and buying a few boxes here and there. You'll be able to make hundreds/thousands of rounds to practice with. I have enough supplies to make 2000 45acp and 2000 9mm - and have powder to spare.

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