There is just something about steel.


PDA






C/O
January 13, 2014, 02:43 PM
I recently picked up a S&W 5906. I really like the S&W 3rd Gens. Don't get me wrong the polymer guns are great, but there is nothing like the feeling of a all steel gun. 193512

If you enjoyed reading about "There is just something about steel." here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
RX-79G
January 13, 2014, 02:49 PM
And, it is the longest lasting, easiest to repair and refinish.

The only thing that might be generally better is titanium, and that's too light for slides and too soft for barrels.

GyMac
January 13, 2014, 03:02 PM
All of my guns are steel. Polymer guns are fine, but my shooting is recreational and the guns that I enjoy the most just happen to be made out of steel.

RX-79G
January 13, 2014, 03:24 PM
I've had several full sized steel framed 9mm pistols that were lighter than an alloy framed Sig P226 or M9.

There really isn't much of a steel disadvantage.

Schwing
January 13, 2014, 03:28 PM
I have a couple of polymer guns but the majority of my collection are steel. I have no problem with polymer guns but the look and feel is just so much better with a solid steel firearm.

Riomouse911
January 13, 2014, 06:36 PM
I was issued a 5906 between 1991-1993. It wasn't a bad design (a tad heavy after a long day) my only not-so-fond memory was a bit of a mushy trigger. Other than that, I think it was a good, durable gun.

I bought a 4013 when they came out, and still have it. That one has a bit of a flip when fired because of the single-stack alloy frame/steel slide.

RussB
January 13, 2014, 07:42 PM
I've had several full sized steel framed 9mm pistols that were lighter than an alloy framed Sig P226 or M9.


What steel 9mm pistols were those?

RX-79G
January 13, 2014, 07:48 PM
P210, P9S, FN HP-DA, Steyr GB. Same or lighter than 32 oz.

Nom de Forum
January 14, 2014, 09:12 PM
P210, P9S, FN HP-DA, Steyr GB. Same or lighter than 32 oz.

Only one out of the four you listed is "Same or lighter than 32 oz." and that is only if you are referring to empty weight. Not that anyone cares about empty weight when carrying.

Sources: Jane's, Small Arms of the World, etc.,etc.

C/O
January 14, 2014, 09:16 PM
Come on guys, why argue on my post.

Nom de Forum
January 14, 2014, 09:43 PM
I recently picked up a S&W 5906. I really like the S&W 3rd Gens. Don't get me wrong the polymer guns are great, but there is nothing like the feeling of a all steel gun. 193512

Beautiful gun. Would not look or feel right in anything other than steel. It is what it is supposed to be. Most of my guns are steel. Never could warm-up to a Commander when I was a 1911 fanatic. Steel is a great material but after reading some very debatable statements about steel as a material for guns in this thread :scrutiny:; I think you ought to expect some comments about steel that are more than about aesthetic qualities. But no more from me. Enjoy your beautiful 5906. :)

HammsBeer
January 14, 2014, 11:26 PM
My 9mm guns are all alloy or polymer frames, but I'd love to get my hands on an all steel 9mm such as a Browning HP with deep blueing.

RX-79G
January 15, 2014, 01:55 AM
I got some of my numbers off:

Beretta 92FS 33.3 oz.
Sig P226 34 oz.
FN HP-DA 32 oz.
HK P9S 32.6 oz.
Sig P210 35.6 oz.

The alloy pistols were even heavier than I thought, and I was wrong on the P210 (bad source). I don't have the GB anymore to confirm.

Point being, steel framed full sized pistols can easily weigh less full size alloy framed guns.

Sources this time: Beretta.com, SigSauer.com, my digital scale

Wreck-n-Crew
January 15, 2014, 08:18 PM
I found a nice 5906 a few month's back and a great deal at the pawn shop. I had one 13 years ago and let someone talk me into selling it to them, needless to say that will never happen again.

I am more accurate with it than any polymer gun I have ever owned/shot when shooting fast. Now I can't slow down! So much fun, low recoil and reliable (eats all my reloads). The 3rd gen S&W were some of the best guns

I also bought a 5903 that I just refinished. love those 3rd gens.

ritepath
January 15, 2014, 08:28 PM
Like...

horsemen61
January 15, 2014, 08:43 PM
nice gun

C/O
January 15, 2014, 09:20 PM
I found a nice 5906 a few month's back and a great deal at the pawn shop. I had one 13 years ago and let someone talk me into selling it to them, needless to say that will never happen again.



I am more accurate with it than any polymer gun I have ever owned/shot when shooting fast. Now I can't slow down! So much fun, low recoil and reliable (eats all my reloads). The 3rd gen S&W were some of the best guns



I also bought a 5903 that I just refinished. love those 3rd gens.


Post some pictures here of your 5903. I'd like to see it.

Wreck-n-Crew
January 15, 2014, 09:56 PM
Post some pictures here of your 5903. I'd like to see it.
Before:
http://i47.photobucket.com/albums/f153/recncru1/52e9b011-80dd-4adc-91f4-ffed91de23bc.jpg
Frame finished, starting assembly:
http://i47.photobucket.com/albums/f153/recncru1/4374ec12-af8b-4a73-b7e7-427bc1102e9d.jpg
complete:
http://i47.photobucket.com/albums/f153/recncru1/3eee7e90-5636-4171-ba58-da1bbb03d7ed.jpg
http://i47.photobucket.com/albums/f153/recncru1/IMG_20140114_164501_0.jpg

Wreck-n-Crew
January 15, 2014, 09:59 PM
How do I make the images smaller other than a link?
:o :cuss:

C/O
January 15, 2014, 10:00 PM
Wreck that looks good.

ratt_finkel
January 15, 2014, 10:19 PM
I prefer all metal guns as well. But I'm not a fan of the shooting characteristics of the third gen Smith's. Though they are nice to look at.

hemiram
January 16, 2014, 06:32 AM
I prefer steel over anything else, there's just something about the weight and feel of it.

Until recently, I only owned two polymer guns, a S&W 15-22 pistol, and a Kel-Tec SUB2000. I disliked polymer in general, but those two were only available that way, and they shot fine. A friend of mine had a Taurus 809, and it felt great, and it ran fine, so I bought one, brand new, and it's been a disaster. It's back at Taurus now, and I have little hope they will fix it. I passed up buying one of the Canik CZ-75 clones to buy it and I feel it was a huge mistake. If the 809 comes back and is still a dud, off it goes, and it will probably be the last polymer gun forever, or at least a long time.

bannockburn
January 16, 2014, 06:36 AM
My favorite all steel gun would have to be the Colt Combat Commander. For it's just the right size and weight, with great balance and handling characteristics.

Nom de Forum
January 16, 2014, 10:55 PM
My favorite all steel gun would have to be the Colt Combat Commander. For it's just the right size and weight, with great balance and handling characteristics.

The Combat Commander was the first modern pistol I bought myself on my 21st birthday. Unfortunately it was also the pistol that taught me what Hoppes #9 does to satin nickel. Back then in the Triassic era I just could not warm up to a Commander because the alloy frame just didn't seem right and still doesn't. It will always be my favorite too because it was my first.

9mmforMe
January 17, 2014, 03:09 AM
All of my current guns are poly, but that Smith and many I've owned do have a great look and feel when all steel.

Mainsail
January 17, 2014, 01:44 PM
Weird you mention the 5906. My dad just gave me his. Prior police gun and he bought it from the officer but he never shot it.

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=193700&d=1389982118

C/O
January 17, 2014, 01:56 PM
Weird you mention the 5906. My dad just gave me his. Prior police gun and he bought it from the officer but he never shot it.



http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=193700&d=1389982118


Well, that's a cool gift.

Wreck-n-Crew
January 17, 2014, 07:26 PM
Weird you mention the 5906. My dad just gave me his. Prior police gun and he bought it from the officer but he never shot it. What have you been waiting on! :eek: Your going to love the recoil. :)

Robbins290
January 17, 2014, 07:58 PM
i sold my 5906, i miss it. but i still have a 3906 and a 3913

Mainsail
January 17, 2014, 09:11 PM
What have you been waiting on! :eek: Your going to love the recoil. :)
I'm hoping to take it out this weekend. I got it oiled and greased and it feels very smooth now. I got three magazines with it; one 14 round, one 14 round marked RESTRICTED, and one 15 round.

Wreck-n-Crew
January 17, 2014, 10:08 PM
14 round marked RESTRICTED, Oh one of those mags from the restricted states for LE use only. Let me know how she shoots!

orionengnr
January 17, 2014, 10:21 PM
Point being, steel framed full sized pistols can easily weigh less full size alloy framed guns.

Not in my experience.
Steel framed 5" 1911...43 oz.
Alloy framed 5" 1911...33-36 oz.

Steel framed Commander sized 1911...36 oz.
Alloy framed Commander sized 1911...28 oz.

Steel framed 3" 1911..28 oz.
Alloy framed 3" 1911...24 oz.

Shall we continue with S&W revolvers in steel/alloy/Scandium frames?

I cannot see how any steel framed handgun can weigh less than a similarly-sized alloy handgun.

Nom de Forum
January 18, 2014, 01:15 AM
"Point being, steel framed full sized pistols can easily weigh less full size alloy framed guns." - RX-79G

Not in my experience.
Steel framed 5" 1911...43 oz.
Alloy framed 5" 1911...33-36 oz.

Steel framed Commander sized 1911...36 oz.
Alloy framed Commander sized 1911...28 oz.

Steel framed 3" 1911..28 oz.
Alloy framed 3" 1911...24 oz.

Shall we continue with S&W revolvers in steel/alloy/Scandium frames?

I cannot see how any steel framed handgun can weigh less than a similarly-sized alloy handgun.


I have been waiting to see if the poster (RX-79G) of the comment you quoted would fully take the hint in my earlier post. With your post I now feel I can further comment without appearing to be a pedant, a nuisance, or argumentative. So here goes.

What is the definition of a “full sized pistol” and more specifically for a semiautomatic? That would be the first thing to establish a parameter for to determine if it is possible for a steel framed “full sized pistol” to be lighter than an alloy framed pistol. Barrel length would appear to be the best indicator of determining size since that is what gun makers typically use. So lets consider some barrel lengths. You already listed two old classic examples of full size and less than full size, 1911 5” and Commander 4.25”. Some additional classic pistols usually considered full size are the P-08 4”, P-38 4.9”, BHP 4.75”, and TT-33 4.5” Here are just a few modern classic examples of full size and less than full size: Beretta 92 4.9” and 92C 4.3”, Glock G17 4.49” and G19 4”. Some additional not so classic modern pistols usually considered full size are the H&K P9S 4”, H&K and P7 4.13”. After looking at these examples and others I think it would be hard to dispute that full size means a barrel length of at least 4” and more realistically 4.5”. What all these numbers mean is, if you are willing to consider a 4” barreled semiautomatic as full size, you can find examples of steel framed “full sized pistols” that are lighter than alloy framed “full size” pistols of a different design. Those lighter steel frame designs achieve this with much shorter barrels, and/or smaller caliber and capacity. When you consider that for most of the history of semiautomatics a full size military service pistol was at least the size of a TT-33 4.5” 29oz, there realistically are very few full size steel framed semiautomatics that “can easily weigh less than full size alloy framed guns”. What and how many “full size” steel framed semiautomatics of same caliber and similar capacity are lighter than a Commander 9mm 4.25” 27oz? Heres a hint for everyone: neither the P210, P9S, FN HP-DA, Steyr GB, or H&K P7 is one of them.

ForumSurfer
January 19, 2014, 04:57 AM
I like polymer guns. I carried a g19 as my daily carry for several years. I'm not sure how many, but it was long enough that my tritium vials went dead. :)

That being said, the feel and heft of steel is a great feeling. I like aluminum too. Something about steel or alloy with nice wooden grips is just right feeling for target or carry (for me anyway) :)

Plus I'm old school. I love beautifully, naturally, rich colored woods and exotic woods. Notice the cocobolo keychain in one of these pics. That's natural with no finish or treatment. My 10 year old son made that for me on the wood lathe Santa brought him for Christmas. Pure awesome if you ask me! :)

Nothing wrong with plastic though...the Glock 19 will always be in my personal top 10 handguns list :)

A few of my favorite steel or aluminum and wood handguns I own/owned:

193803
193804
193805
193806
193807

ForumSurfer
January 19, 2014, 06:58 AM
Over the years I've also found that weight for a carry gun just doesn't matter to me. That's just ME. We're all different.

I carried a g19 for many years. Currently I carry that colt rail gun. It's overall longer. It weighs as much as two g19s. But it's also thinner. It also isn't noticeable from a weight standpoint with a great belt. My belt is a standard wilderness style belt. I don't need a rigid leather belt, they're uncomfortable to me. Shoot, I don't even need an instructor belt with the stiff Kydex strip seen in. I carry that all steel beast under a snug fitting tshirt with a reload just fine with a double stitched TDU style belt comfortably all day long and I'm not having to pull my pants up throughout the day.

I understand some folks have hip, neck or back issues. For those folks I understand that ounces are very important but I'm youngish (36), healthy and active. I'll go ahead and carry what I shoot well with. :)

doubleh
January 19, 2014, 11:11 AM
I can't argue with you, C/O. I have a couple of the plastic fantastics that I have never learned to love. Tried to trade one of them off on a 1911 yesterday and my dealer wouldn't do it. He said my S&W would just lay there with the other one that's been laying there for months and he will sell the 1911 pretty quick. Can't really blame him.

Mainsail
January 19, 2014, 03:53 PM
Oh one of those mags from the restricted states for LE use only. Let me know how she shoots!
OK, I feel dumb. My 14 round magazines hold 15 rounds....because they're all 15 round magazines. I never turned it over- 14 is the last number on one side, but 15 is on the other. Sorry, never owned a S&W auto before.

Anyway, it ate 150 rounds of ball ammo without a single hiccup and another 20 rounds of 147gr HSTs as well. The heavy steel frame made the recoil pretty light.

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=193835&d=1390164812

RX-79G
January 20, 2014, 02:21 AM
Is a Beretta 92 or Sig P226 suddenly not alloy framed pistols because some other alloy guns are much lighter?

My point was simple - an all steel FN HP-DA has almost identical specs to a P226, but is 2 oz. lighter despite the steel frame. And the P226 is a very common design.


There are heavy polymer guns and light steel guns. Steel frames do not have to be heavy. But if you want to compare only guns that are steel frame designs made out of aluminum, of course they're lighter. They are also much less durable than a dedicated alloy frame design.

Nom de Forum
January 20, 2014, 09:05 PM
"Point being, steel framed full sized pistols can easily weigh less full size alloy framed guns." - RX-79G

Is a Beretta 92 or Sig P226 suddenly not alloy framed pistols because some other alloy guns are much lighter?

I donít think this was suggested by anyone.


My point was simple - an all steel FN HP-DA has almost identical specs to a P226, but is 2 oz. lighter despite the steel frame. And the P226 is a very common design.

Why isnít it as commonly used as the P226? Could it be like the original HP it a relatively lightly constructed steel gun and is not as durable as the SIG. The extra weight in the SIG is in the slide and hood. Have you ever seen the cracking that shows up faster on an P-35HP with a high round count in comparison to more heavily built steel and alloy guns?


There are heavy polymer guns and light steel guns. Steel frames do not have to be heavy. But if you want to compare only guns that are steel frame designs made out of aluminum, of course they're lighter. They are also much less durable than a dedicated alloy frame design.

First off I think your FN HP-DA despite having a steel frame has a slide and barrel design that makes it probably less durable than a 9mm Commander. I am not so sure a Beretta 92S is more durable than a 9mm Commander.

Ok, you donít like my comparison using a design originally conceived in steel then sized down and using an alloy frame. How about a comparison using a conceived in alloy and sized down pistol that is much closer in OAL and OAH to the FN HP-DA than the Beretta 92S. Compare the FN HP-DA to a Beretta 92SB-C. They are very close in size and weight. So close I cannot 100% confirm from various sources that the Beretta is 0.4 ounces lighter. So lets call it even. Which do you think is more durable and reliable? My money is on the Beretta. So what happens when you design to make a steel framed pistol as light or lighter than a comparable alloy frame? Compromises in durability and additional manufacturing costs. Why arenít FN HP-DAs widely used? Could it be customers civil and governmental recognized that it did not offer advantages and has disadvantages compared to other steel, alloy and polymer designs?

Point being, gun makers have figured out they cannot make and expect to sell steel framed full size pistols that ďcan easily weigh less than full size alloy framed gunsĒ.


All this steel versus alloy (aluminum alloy) weight debate is rather pointless as neither material is the future of frame design.

RX-79G
January 20, 2014, 09:09 PM
The R51 and Striker pistol are fresh new designs using alloy frames.

Nom de Forum
January 20, 2014, 10:10 PM
The R51 and Striker pistol are fresh new designs using alloy frames.

After seeing so many new "wonder pistols" over the decades that were going to be the greatest thing since sliced bread, I would not bet your paycheck on them winning any police or military contracts, etc. Besides don't you know the new R51 will be offered with a lighter, more durable, comfortable polymer frame as soon as it becomes economically viable. :D Going with alloy was probably as much a marketing department decision for the historical reference PR as an engineering decision for making a safe bet in using what is already known to work with a pistol of this design.

RX-79G
January 21, 2014, 02:19 AM
You're not thinking about how either of these pistols work. Compared to a Browning action, both of these guns would need an extensive metal subframe to operate correctly. Just making the whole thing out of metal is cheaper and probably lighter.

Nom de Forum
January 21, 2014, 06:58 AM
You're not thinking about how either of these pistols work. Compared to a Browning action, both of these guns would need an extensive metal subframe to operate correctly. Just making the whole thing out of metal is cheaper and probably lighter.

I wonder how extensive it would really have to be in the R51 and if the weight would not remain about the same at worse while achieving the advantages of polymer over metal. What "Striker" pistol? Are you referring to the new SIG 320? It has a polymer frame with steel subframe. It weighs about 26 ounces. How do you think that would compare to a scaled up R51? I think probably very favorably. For Big Green making the R51 in metal may be cheaper initially because of company infrastructure but I still think my original speculation about why they chose a metal frame is likely on target.

RX-79G
January 21, 2014, 11:47 AM
The Arsenal Strike-One.

Hey, if the "sub frame" is a huge chunk of metal with the plastic only providing a mag well and trigger guard, how much is it worth claiming that it is a polymer pistol frame? A P9S is pretty close to that, but no one would call it a polymer frame.

Nom de Forum
January 21, 2014, 12:23 PM
The Arsenal Strike-One.

Hey, if the "sub frame" is a huge chunk of metal with the plastic only providing a mag well and trigger guard, how much is it worth claiming that it is a polymer pistol frame? A P9S is pretty close to that, but no one would call it a polymer frame.

You don't expect gun makers to use accurate nomenclature after three centuries of inconsistency do you? Think about it. Ever shot a .40 caliber bullet in a gun chambered in .38-40? Ever heard of a "Safety Automatic" pistol that is only semiautomatic in action and not particularly safe? Why do we refer to a Beretta 92 as a DA/SA pistol but don't refer to a S&W 10 as a DA/SA revolver? Look at the video on the new SIG 320. SIG refers to it as a polymer pistol then shows you how you can remove "a huge chunk of metal" to put it into two other polymer frame sizes.:D

RX-79G
January 21, 2014, 01:23 PM
I don't expect anything from gun companies but for them to claim whatever they can get away with that sells guns. If steel frames were in vogue, they'd call it that with a "polymer overgrip". The public believes nylon is a wonder material called "polymer", so that is what they call it.

We don't call revolvers "DA/SA" because they are not. Successive shots are not automatically SA with a standard revolver, or on the "revolver mode" of the Browning BDM pistol - which was DA shot to shot, but could be manually cocked.

Non-automatic revolvers are DA, SA or DAO. Autos are DA/SA, DAO, DA, HDA, HDA/SA, SA or SAO (if you want to designate a converted DA/SA platform).

Nom de Forum
January 21, 2014, 03:44 PM
I don't expect anything from gun companies but for them to claim whatever they can get away with that sells guns. If steel frames were in vogue, they'd call it that with a "polymer overgrip". The public believes nylon is a wonder material called "polymer", so that is what they call it.

We don't call revolvers "DA/SA" because they are not. Successive shots are not automatically SA with a standard revolver, or on the "revolver mode" of the Browning BDM pistol - which was DA shot to shot, but could be manually cocked.

Non-automatic revolvers are DA, SA or DAO. Autos are DA/SA, DAO, DA, HDA, HDA/SA, SA or SAO (if you want to designate a converted DA/SA platform).

Nylon is a very specific formulation so I don't think disparagingly referring to the polymer used in a Glock as nylon is an accurate comment. Plastic is not just Plastic. There is a big difference between chicken and beef even if both are meat.

Ok, I agree DA revolvers don't automatically become SA with successive shots but they do return to the capability of being SA with successive shots. How's that for being pedantic?;)

RX-79G
January 21, 2014, 04:11 PM
Nylon isn't disparaging. It is accurate. "Polymer" is a word that you don't understand, and have come to believe it defines something that it does not.

Glocks are made of nylon (Nylon 60?) with some coloring agent and fiberglass. Pretty much what all the "polymer" pistols also use to one degree or another, which the exception of Ruger, who used a glass reinforced polyurethane product from Dupont for the P95 frame and others.

And since you are into definitions, the material "plastic" is defined as a moldable material made of organic polymers.

"Polymers" are just complex molecules, like proteins and hydrocarbons. They can be used to make plastics, or eggs. "Polymer" does not mean much of anything when it comes to guns, since snot is just as much a polymer as epoxy is.

Lycra is a brand and type of polyurethane.
Polyurethane, polystyrene and nylon are types of plastic.
Plastic is composed of polymers.
Polymers are made of monomers.
Monomers are molecules composed of atoms.


Why don't we just call the Glock frame "Atomic"? It's just as descriptive as "polymer".:rolleyes:

Mastodon
January 21, 2014, 04:23 PM
Steel and a hammer for me.

Nom de Forum
January 21, 2014, 06:44 PM
Nylon isn't disparaging. It is accurate. "Polymer" is a word that you don't understand, and have come to believe it defines something that it does not.

Glocks are made of nylon (Nylon 60?) with some coloring agent and fiberglass. Pretty much what all the "polymer" pistols also use to one degree or another, which the exception of Ruger, who used a glass reinforced polyurethane product from Dupont for the P95 frame and others.

And since you are into definitions, the material "plastic" is defined as a moldable material made of organic polymers.

"Polymers" are just complex molecules, like proteins and hydrocarbons. They can be used to make plastics, or eggs. "Polymer" does not mean much of anything when it comes to guns, since snot is just as much a polymer as epoxy is.

Lycra is a brand and type of polyurethane.
Polyurethane, polystyrene and nylon are types of plastic.
Plastic is composed of polymers.
Polymers are made of monomers.
Monomers are molecules composed of atoms.


Why don't we just call the Glock frame "Atomic"? It's just as descriptive as "polymer".:rolleyes:

Thanks for the mini-review of polymer terminology. I already had a good understanding of the basics you reviewed. I did not learn everything I know about "plastics" from "The Graduate".;) I guess if I can accept the use of Manual Firing Inhibitor Lever by one poster I can accept your use of Nylon. You should accept the need to be prepared to take some heat from other people because you are at the very least using non-standard terminology and perceived as disparaging Glock "Perfection". Personally I think we should use the term "Bakelite". It is completely inaccurate but sounds cool. We could even start a trend in street slang: "I burned 'em down with my shake-in-bake." :D

orionengnr
January 21, 2014, 06:48 PM
Some mighty thin skins around here for a place that calls itself "The High Road"...or perhaps some members have not quite gotten the hint...:rolleyes:

RX-79G
January 21, 2014, 06:51 PM
I'm not worried about using taking heat because other people prefer marketing lingo to actual defined nomenclature.

Excuse me while I put some polymer on my slide rails. I have some other polymer I'm reloading my empty cases with, later.

Nom de Forum
January 21, 2014, 08:11 PM
Some mighty thin skins around here for a place that calls itself "The High Road"...or perhaps some members have not quite gotten the hint...:rolleyes:

Well, if nobody participating minds the possibility of receiving a few intellectual bruises, walking the the high road while engaged in banter and intellectual sparing makes The High Road a more enjoyable, mentally challenging hike. You have to have a thick skin for that. For some of us strolling while engaged in mutual backslapping while enjoyable also can quickly get monotonous. I guess all good things have to come to an end. Sorry Orionengnr if our boisterous jog disturbed the tranquility of The High Road for you and anybody else. Sincerely. No Joke. Nom de Forum out.

Nom de Forum
January 21, 2014, 08:13 PM
I'm not worried about using taking heat because other people prefer marketing lingo to actual defined nomenclature.

Excuse me while I put some polymer on my slide rails. I have some other polymer I'm reloading my empty cases with, later.

That's funny!:D

O.K. I'm out-a-here.

Wreck-n-Crew
January 21, 2014, 09:09 PM
The public believes nylon is a wonder material called "polymer", so that is what they call it. Glock used the Polymer terminology as a replacement to the "Plastic" reference being used to describe them. Plastic was thought of as cheap in the 80's and early 90's. A campaign by Glock to change the perception of the "plastic" gun and improve sales was very successful.

I still love my steel even though I have had many that were not. At one time I had no steel firearm, selling/trading them off. That had to change...and it did. I am happy again :D

If you enjoyed reading about "There is just something about steel." here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!