Has anyone powder coated a brassie frame?


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elhombreconnonombre
January 13, 2014, 03:08 PM
I'm wanting to change the appearance of my brass framed Remy buffalo. I thought about a Krylon rattle can paint job followed a clear coat as a simple minded solution, but am considering powder coat. Ive heard that you heat the brass at a lower temp for a longer time in order for the powder coat to adhere to the brass sucessfully.

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fdf
January 13, 2014, 03:23 PM
Why?

At the end of the day it is still a brass framed revolver and worth less than what it was worth. Might add some brass tacks to the grips as well for a total affect.

elhombreconnonombre
January 13, 2014, 04:23 PM
Why you ask mr. fdf? Because I can. BTW thanks for the brass tacks idea for the grips, but I prefer Croation hickory.

fdf
January 13, 2014, 06:04 PM
Why you ask mr. fdf? Because I can. BTW thanks for the brass tacks idea for the grips, but I prefer Croation hickory.
__________________

I can ask 'cause I can, I can have my own thoughts and they are not Remmy's

Personally I think it is stupid to ruin a firearm with stupid ideas, Forrest Gump, "stupid is as stupid does.

My thoughts and I get to have them, kind of like your next idea, paint it John Deer Green and make a song out of it.

BowerR64
January 13, 2014, 06:20 PM
I never thought to try that, i liked my brass Remmie but i couldnt stand how it looked.

Its like a rail and an AR butstock on a lever action rifle it just looks wrong in my eyes.

The brass looks great on the colt but on a Remmie to me it looks like a clown gun. (sorry if that offends anyone)

I had a brass frame buffalo also. The look of that super long barrel and the brass frame oh man.

What color would you powder coat the brass?

45 Dragoon
January 13, 2014, 06:36 PM
WOW, fdf, I've never asked your permission to do anything and I believe I will continue to do so. You must be SO pissed !!

45 Dragoon


SHEESH !!!!!!

Malachi Leviticus Blue
January 13, 2014, 06:38 PM
I pretty much agree with the "clown gun" comment
Not as bad on a colt or Spiller & Burr but not on a remmie
I also don't know if powder coating would hold up too well on brass, but I don't think it would improve it. If I was going to try to improve it I think I'd Nickle plate it.

fdf
January 13, 2014, 07:03 PM
I just hate to see non-"frinkled" guns", frinkled " with.

Really don't care how you ruin what you own, not my worry, time for a Johnny Walker Blue.

JN01
January 13, 2014, 08:46 PM
The brass looks great on the colt but on a Remmie to me it looks like a clown gun. (sorry if that offends anyone)

As a clown, I am offended. Apology accepted. :evil:

elhombreconnonombre
January 13, 2014, 11:08 PM
Thats an idea...a steel blue/black wrinkle ... oops frinkle finish. I'll have to check my guy at the auto paint shop if he can mix that up in a rattle can.

crazyjennyblack
January 14, 2014, 07:14 AM
I had a thread kind of like this one a while back. I've always wondered how one would change the brass frame color to a black color. Brass frames are cheap, and I can even find them at gun shows and garage sales way undervalued because fewer people like the color. I've thought about nickel plating a brass frame. Worth less? Maybe, but worth like beauty is in the eye of the beholder...

I'm interested to see what solutions people come up with. This could be a good thread if people could post something positive. :)

Fingers McGee
January 14, 2014, 12:21 PM
A little Birchwood -Casey Brass Black would do the trick I'm thinkin.

Noz
January 14, 2014, 01:15 PM
A little Birchwood -Casey Brass Black would do the trick I'm thinkin.
but would it be frinkled?

elhombreconnonombre
January 14, 2014, 01:54 PM
I've for an old brass trigger guard I'll try the brass black on and see what it does.
Thanks for the tip

whughett
January 14, 2014, 02:16 PM
How about one of those transfer jobs one sees on shot guns so often now, seems to work on them. You know the ones where a film is floated on water and the parts dipped and lifted out. Perhaps some one had a color other than camo. Lots of guns are "paint" finished now.

Malachi Leviticus Blue
January 14, 2014, 02:20 PM
but would it be frinkled?

If the brass is not really really clean before application then I've heard that the "Black" rubs off and leaves a frinkled finish. :D

jaxenro
January 14, 2014, 03:26 PM
The reason brass frames don't look right on Remington's is brass frames don't look right on Remington's. Nothing you do to it is really gonna make it seem right except maybe replacing it with steel. You could dip the whole gun camo and call it a hunters model, you could paint it pink and call it a girls model, rub burnt black powder over the frame to blacken it, get one of those brush plate nickel kits and plate it, but it will still be brass.

The reason brassy used to mean cheap is because brass is cheap. I'd say do whatever you want to it, shoot it and enjoy it, and ignore what anyone tells you

45 Dragoon
January 14, 2014, 05:40 PM
Well said jaxenro, well said !!!

crazyjennyblack
January 14, 2014, 11:30 PM
Fingers McGee - that brass black stuff doesn't work well. Someone posted a while back on this forum (or maybe another, I forget) and it rubbed off quite quickly. Kind of a shame.

So far I think the nickel plating is the best-looking fix. I like a two -tone gun, but with silver instead of gold.

BowerR64
January 14, 2014, 11:38 PM
Fingers McGee - that brass black stuff doesn't work well. Someone posted a while back on this forum (or maybe another, I forget) and it rubbed off quite quickly. Kind of a shame.

So far I think the nickel plating is the best-looking fix. I like a two -tone gun, but with silver instead of gold.
Yeah i tried it but i didnt use any heat, i have no idea what im doing i just tried it.

It was about as good as using a sharpie.

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=191070&stc=1&d=1384205786

2 days later it looked like this
http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=191153&stc=1&d=1384329082

elhombreconnonombre
January 15, 2014, 02:05 AM
Well I have been all over, checking out guys that paint their weapons and brass beds. If it exists in black,(not likely) Im going to try painting the frame with ceramic engine enamel after roughing up the surface of the frame a bit. Speaking of clown guns, Tim Burtons Batman was on cable tonite. I thought it was funny When Jack Nicholson pulled that 3 ' barrel da Colt prop revolver out of his pants shot the BatJet.

BowerR64
January 15, 2014, 03:33 AM
I was at walmart tonight and there is some new western out on dvd and i swear on the front cover the guy is holding what looks like a brass frame Remington.

Im not sure what movie it is though i think it was in some 2 box set or something.

elhombreconnonombre
January 15, 2014, 07:59 AM
In doing further research on painting brass I learned I will probably need to use an etching primer first.

DaveP (UK)
January 15, 2014, 09:31 AM
You might also want to consider forming a radius on the edges. Paint doesn't hold its film thickness over sharp corners.

I do wonder how what is essentially going to be a relatively soft surface coating will stand up to gas cutting and frequent cleaning.

whughett
January 15, 2014, 09:39 AM
High polish chrome plating would look real bad ass, do the wole gun.:evil:

elhombreconnonombre
January 15, 2014, 09:58 AM
Duplicolor does offer a high temp ceramic engine paint in high gloss black.

forward observer
January 15, 2014, 08:56 PM
I've had good luck with a product called "Blacken-it". It's sold by most hobby shops--especially if they carry model railroad stuff. The bottle says that it's not recommended for aluminum or stainless steel. I first used it in blackening small brass model parts that were supposed to be painted iron. It was much easier than painting and more durable. I've found that it gives less of a dull matte finish than the Birchwood Casey product.

At some point about 35 years ago, I obtained an Iver Johnson (Uberti made)Colt SAA clone, which had both a trigger guard and backstrap of brass. Once I acquired a real Colt SAA, the brass on the clone simply didn't look right. It took a couple of tries before I got it looking good, but I have only had to re-treat a couple of times over the years.

The secret was to polish the brass first with a non-acidic polish such as Flitz or MAAS, then clean again with a solvent such as Xylene or denatured alcohol. Wear disposable nitrile gloves since you do not want any body oils to get on the brass.

They recommend wearing gloves while using the Blacken-it anyway.

I went through a four ounce bottle since I found that it worked best to pour enough of the product into a ceramic bowl to immerse the part. You can dilute it a bit with water to get a bit more volume. I have never used any heat, but the next time I have to re-treat or touch up I may try that.

The gun I treated this way is the 7.5 barrel at lower right. It's been about 5 years since I last treated it, and although I've handled it, I haven't shot it much---so it's holding up pretty well.

http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y74/forward_observer/oldwest2002JPGforpost_zps6149469d.jpg


P.S. This might be a better comparison. The 7.5 inch looked just like the 5.5 before I treated it. I never intended to get another SAA clone with brass straps, but it was part of a good deal I got on a mint Uberti 1866 Yellowboy rifle clone--all for less than the price of a new rifle.
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y74/forward_observer/brassblack_zps38342a73.jpg

elhombreconnonombre
January 16, 2014, 03:59 PM
Another great idea to consider. Thanks FO for the constructive suggestion. I have considered heating the brass parts in the oven first before application to insure surface sdhesion. If this works out I May created a second life for all of those brass colts on the "island of misfit Colt repros" in the back of our gunsafes that some folk look down on. My view is that if they shoot well and you have fun doping it then its all good.

BowerR64
January 16, 2014, 05:06 PM
Just do the top strap and the front kinda like the colt lol

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=193661&stc=1&d=1389909971

Rom828
January 16, 2014, 10:35 PM
I'd just sell it and get a steel framed gun. Anything you do will wear or chip. Never took a second look at a brass framed Remington until I watched "Hatfield and McCoy's". Devil Anse carries a sweet looking brass framed Remmie in the show. I'd kind of like to get one now.

BowerR64
January 16, 2014, 11:02 PM
Ive never heard of this movie before, or is it a tv series?

Looks like a brass frame Remington?
http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=193678&stc=1&d=1389931308

forward observer
January 16, 2014, 11:36 PM
Another great idea to consider. Thanks FO for the constructive suggestion. I have considered heating the brass parts in the oven first before application to insure surface sdhesion. If this works out I May created a second life for all of those brass colts on the "island of misfit Colt repros" in the back of our gunsafes that some folk look down on. My view is that if they shoot well and you have fun doping it then its all good.

After looking at your original post again, I got to thinking that in might not work well to try the Blacken-it on such a large area as a frame. It's OK for the straps as I used, but one issue is that any place you nick it, brass is going to shine through. This is going to happen more often to the frame from simply removing the cylinder, loading, and/or firing.

It's never going to look totally like blued steel and under certain light will look a bit mottled.

It has been satisfactory for straps since there is not much flat area for one to observe the variations, but doing it over an entire frame might just tend to look more like the Sharpie effect.

In addition, I have always done this by removing the straps entirely from the pistol to completely immerse them in the stuff.

Wiping it on doesn't seem to work well because the solution tends to be repelled or bead up on the metal. It needs to stay in contact to achieve a decent effect. Of course your idea of heating the metal might solve this issue.

I have also avoided getting this stuff on blued parts and I don't know what it would do.

Consequently, if it has an adverse effect on blued steel, you would also have to remove the barrel from the frame before using the immersion technique.

Just some additional information to consider.

Cheers

Captain*kirk
January 16, 2014, 11:49 PM
Personally, I would nickel plate it. Most of the Pietta "show guns" (you know, the fancy nickel plated engraved ones with the white pearl grips you see at Bass Pro) are brass framed. You just can't tell under the nickel.

elhombreconnonombre
January 17, 2014, 09:45 AM
BoweR64
Wow, I wondered what ever happened to Ernie Hudson since the movie ."Congo", with that fake Brit accent, but Bruce Campbell did have a bit part in it ...plus new songs by One of the "Brooks and Overdone" boys...wow. If my Remy wasnt a big ol clown gun I might just keep it in the brass.
I did see a nice engraved nickle plated buffalo with fancy grips at a gun show recently....Hmmmm.

BowerR64
January 17, 2014, 11:40 PM
BoweR64
Wow, I wondered what ever happened to Ernie Hudson since the movie ."Congo", with that fake Brit accent, but Bruce Campbell did have a bit part in it ...plus new songs by One of the "Brooks and Overdone" boys...wow. If my Remy wasnt a big ol clown gun I might just keep it in the brass.
I did see a nice engraved nickle plated buffalo with fancy grips at a gun show recently....Hmmmm.
Might be fun to watch just to see that brass Remington in action huh?

elhombreconnonombre
January 30, 2014, 08:22 AM
My solution: Roughen up the brass frame with a Scotchbrite pad, paint with 2000 degree black epoxy header paint, and cure in the oven. Well see how it wears.

BowerR64
January 30, 2014, 11:43 PM
I thought about buying another one and try and plate it.

Think a nickle plating would hold up? They seem fairly simple, maybe to simple to hold up.

BowerR64
February 16, 2014, 12:38 PM
Im going to try something different with this one.

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=195019&stc=1&d=1392572214

I got this one at the gun show yesterday for $105. the whole gun was in about as bad condition as the trigger guard. I should of taken a picture of it before i started cleaning it. I never think far enuogh ahead.

elhombreconnonombre
March 14, 2014, 01:29 PM
Here's what I finally did.
I applied several light coats of VHT 2000 degree ceramic epoxy header paint cured at successively higher temps to cure and harden. It's durable and appears to fill the shallow Italian proof marks, for you defarbers out there. The color and finish looked like old school rat rod flat black primer so I put on a light coat of Duplicolor 500 degree epoxy semi gloss black engine enamel and baked in in the BBQ smoker again to cure and harden the finish coat. Now it is very close to the finish of the barrel and cylinder. If I happen to accedentally scratch it I'll touch it up with a BC paint pen. To top it off I deblued and highly polished the cylinder like a Remington I saw in a museum. Pics coming soon.
I might try this with the brass frame on my 1851 .44, but with a silver/chrome ceramic header paint base with fake "case color" highlights and swirls.

BowerR64
March 15, 2014, 01:22 AM
Eventually im going to try a nickle plating. They have little kits to do it

elhombreconnonombre
March 15, 2014, 12:22 PM
I had one of those inexpensive plating kits. The results were not impressive.

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