Ruger LCR in 327 Federal Magnum?


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tomrkba
January 18, 2014, 04:46 PM
Would the cylinder of the LCR be able to hold six rounds of 327 Federal Magnum? I think this would be a very nice cartridge for the gun.

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Jaymo
January 19, 2014, 12:41 AM
I'd like to have one in a 5 OR a 6 shot version.

horsemen61
January 19, 2014, 12:57 AM
I'd pre order that sounds awesome please read ruger

Old Fuff
January 19, 2014, 01:02 PM
The .327 Magnum's pressure is in the 50,000 PSI range, and performance-wise it roughly duplicates the M1 .30 Carbine when that cartridge is fired in a handgun.

I have no doubt that Ruger can produce an LCR/Magnum version that will stand up to it, but I'm not sure about the shooter's hand and wrist. :eek:

Of course one could shoot .32 H&R Magnum, .32 S&W Long, and .32 S&W cartridges in it. But personally I would rather see a .32 H&R Magnum/6-shot, on the .38 Special platform.

357 Terms
January 19, 2014, 05:23 PM
I'm thinking ruger is/has given up on the 327.

Too bad, I would love a six shot LCR chambered in it.

Hometeached1
January 19, 2014, 05:28 PM
I would love to buy one, or two even. Yes I love this round!

kcofohio
January 19, 2014, 06:21 PM
357, I think you're right. It looks as though S&W is the only one listed in 327 Federal from a search on Gallery of Guns site.

W.E.G.
January 19, 2014, 06:35 PM
Ruger LCR in 327 Federal Magnum?... I think this would be a very nice cartridge for the gun

I completely agree.

But given that the .357 and .38 models are available en masse, what would a .327 snub really offer that the .357/.38 guns don't already offer?

I hope nobody thinks the .327 is superior to a 158-grain .38 plodding along at 850 fps.

The snub .38 might have a smidgen more recoil than the .327, but I'll assert that the muzzle-blast of the supersonic .327, to the unprotected ear, would be far more traumatic to the shooter than the recoil of the old "FBI load."

The .327 was the answer to the question that nobody was asking.

Agsalaska
January 19, 2014, 09:09 PM
I'm thinking ruger is/has given up on the 327.

Too bad, I would love a six shot LCR chambered in it.
Which is unfortunate. I totally disagree that it is 'an answer to a question nobody is asking.' The exact same thing could be said about 95% of the cartridges available today. This one actually did something with the sixth round in the snubbies.

If you watch the .327 sell on gun broker they command very high premiums.

horsemen61
January 19, 2014, 09:14 PM
Could a 38 special cylinder be cut for it

Mayvik
January 19, 2014, 09:35 PM
Could a 38 special cylinder be cut for it
No...it is smaller...

As for what it offers, at minimum an extra round. I suspect most 327 bashers have never fired one.

Jim Watson
January 19, 2014, 09:41 PM
It mystified me that the LCR was not made in .327 but the SP 101 was.
The LCR is available 5x.357 so there is no reason to think it would not handle 6x.327.

Onward Allusion
January 19, 2014, 09:49 PM
That little gun will not be able to handle a full-house 327. Also, out of a snub the 327's energy is sapped.

What one of these manufacturer's need to do is make a 327 in a X-Frame type revolver with a 6" barrel. Imagine 9 or 10 shots of this stuff...

tomrkba
January 19, 2014, 09:49 PM
Yes, the goal was to get a sixth round into a small cylinder. I would love to try it.

The SP101 was chambered in 327 Federal and held six rounds. I would buy that gun despite my hate for the SP101. I would customize the gun to make it work for me.
http://www.gunblast.com/Bowen-327s.htm

Bowen also chambered an S&W Model 66 in 327 Federal.

The S&W Model 632 is a J-Frame. My guess is that Ruger could do it.

N-Frame in 327 would be interesting, but I would prefer eight rounds of 9x23 mm.

joneb
January 19, 2014, 10:42 PM
The .327 was the answer to the question that nobody was asking.
I agree.
I think something like this chambered in a 5 shot 44spl with a 2.5" barrel would be more to my liking.
http://www.ruger.com/products/gp100MatchChampion/models.html

tomrkba
January 19, 2014, 11:37 PM
I think something like this chambered in a 5 shot 44spl with a 2.5" barrel would be more to my liking.

The L Frame is too large. The point was to put six rounds of the most powerful caliber possible into a J-Frame or LCR cylinder.

Mr.357Sig
January 19, 2014, 11:46 PM
That'd be sweet! Make it so.

shadow9
January 19, 2014, 11:53 PM
IIRC, there was a debate once regarding bullet weight and barrel length - and the eventual conclusion was that a heavier round was better in shorter barrels - as the effects of the barrel was equal on both light and heavy rounds, but a heavy round would do more with less speed than a light round at less speed. Also, the heavier round carried it's momentum better, so in the long run it had a better "whack" than the small round did. Hence the reason the LSWC-HP 158gr FBI load was your best bet in a snub.

I also really don't see much need for a .327FM LCR. I'm in full agreement that there is just WAY too little barrel to do anything with that kind of round. Also, the blast on it (as blast is relative to chamber pressure, especially in small pistols) would be unpleasant to say the least.

W.E.G.
January 20, 2014, 05:01 PM
Could a 38 special cylinder be cut for it


Yes.

That what Ruger did with a limited-run SP-101 in this caliber.
There is one over on GB right now.
Seller wants $850 - which is about $300 more than I would pay for that gun, even if I really wanted it.

herkyguy
January 21, 2014, 10:02 AM
Heavy Bullet? So what about going back to moon clips and 45 Auto?

Saleen322
January 21, 2014, 02:24 PM
If you want best performance out of a 327 magnum, you have to load for it. In terms of self defense effectiveness, you need to have good penetration with adequate energy. Given the same bullet construction, the projectile with the greatest sectional density will penetrate the best.

The most common comparisons for the 327 are the 38 special and 357 mag. Since it was mentioned in this thread, a 38 special 158 @ 850 generates 254 ft/lbs of energy with a sectional density number of .177. Because sectional density rewards heavy bullets relative to bore size, one of the largest common 357 magnum is a 180 grain. Federal lists two 357 magnum 180s one at 1080 fps and another at 1130. These two will have 466 and 510 ft/lbs of energy respectively and both with a sectional density of about .202. I load a 327 magnum 153 cast bullet that now makes 1190 fps which generates 481 ft/lbs of energy and with a sectional density number of .225. This puts the energy right in with the 357 magnum plus a bullet that penetrates better. The 38 is not in the same picture. Just for comparison, a 45 Auto 230 grain (Federal Numbers) would be in the 900 fps range for 414 ft/lbs of energy with a sectional density number of .162. Another 327 magnum benefit is significantly less recoil.

The "problem" with 327 magnums is lack of factory ammo options. Most all it is in the 85 to 100 grain range. This creates three shortcomings; low sectional density numbers, thinner jackets on the bullets that expand quick and maybe too quick for 327 velocities, and too much powder to burn in very short barrels. YMMV

Hokkmike
January 22, 2014, 01:37 PM
Would the cylinder of the LCR be able to hold six rounds of 327 Federal Magnum? I think this would be a very nice cartridge for the gun.

A very good idea. My SP101 holds 6.

Mayvik
January 22, 2014, 08:35 PM
Saleen, that load sounds good for penetration but you are getting a .32 hole how deep? Seems like with negligible expansion you will won't transfer all of that energy to the target. What bullet types are the 357 you are comparing to, and from what platform are your velocities?

W.E.G.
January 22, 2014, 11:07 PM
If you "transfer all the energy" to the target, the "target" will feel the same amount of "push" that the shooter felt in the palm of his hand when the gun fired.

What is this "energy" nonsense?

Guns kill things by destroying the nerves and blood vessels in animate creatures.
Not by "transferring energy."

joneb
January 23, 2014, 03:07 AM
What is this "energy" nonsense?
https://www.google.com/search?q=positive+energy&client=firefox-a&hs=0vG&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&tbm=isch&source=iu&imgil=PRBM9wRGvcTJZM%253A%253Bhttps%253A%252F%252Fencrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com%252Fimages%253Fq%253Dtbn%253AANd9GcRpwpn83VLwmrCbIPCH2wZoHjH8D60_6G5dyUhFvKMf2jkIsYVF%253B640%253B427%253BRy9q4NnOUcWkxM%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Ftinybuddha.com%25252Fblog%25252Fon-creating-positive-energy-for-positive-change%25252F&sa=X&ei=Xc3gUriAN4PmoATuwoJA&ved=0CC8Q9QEwAQ&biw=1280&bih=858#facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=PRBM9wRGvcTJZM%253A%3BRy9q4NnOUcWkxM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fcdn.tinybuddha.com%252Fwp-content%252Fuploads%252F2010%252F01%252FPositive-Energy1.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Ftinybuddha.com%252Fblog%252Fon-creating-positive-energy-for-positive-change%252F%3B640%3B427
:)

Saleen322
January 23, 2014, 09:04 AM
Seems like with negligible expansion you will won't transfer all of that energy to the target. What bullet types are the 357 you are comparing to, and from what platform are your velocities?

I tend to favor bullets that penetrate for large game hunting. You can do gel and barrier testing and while useful, it still leaves gaps. The largest gap is whether the bullet strikes large, heavy bone or just goes through soft tissue. If you hit a deer or bear on the shoulder bone, it takes strong bullet construction to get through it while still maintaining good mass to penetrate vital organs. The trade off is if you only hit soft tissue, the bullet just goes with little expansion. Dangerous game ammo often use "solids" for the same reasons. While these bullets are not as flashy as some newer hollow points that show dynamic results in gel tests, they are very reliable. I tend to believe what works well in hunting is also solid for self defense. Elmer Keith used the same principles to great effect for years. In any case, there are trade offs.

As I noted in the previous post, I just took Federal Ammunition published data for the 357 comparison velocities and energy.

horsemen61
January 23, 2014, 09:13 AM
Would it be possible to have a machinist cut a 327 mag cylinder yes I'm sure it will cost a lot

Chuck Perry
January 23, 2014, 08:25 PM
I load a 327 magnum 153 cast bullet that now makes 1190 fps which generates 481 ft/lbs of energy and with a sectional density number of .225.

Are these available commercially or did you cast them yourself? I have an SP in 327 and would like to try some heavy for caliber cast bullets.

Saleen322
January 23, 2014, 11:31 PM
Are these available commercially or did you cast them yourself? I have an SP in 327 and would like to try some heavy for caliber cast bullets.

I cast these myself and size them to .312 with a gas check. I am still tweaking them but, so far, they really show promise.

herrwalther
January 24, 2014, 11:30 PM
No. I love the .327 round but many makers have dropped the cartridge. Ruger, Smith, and Charter have all abandoned the .327 in lieu of more .38 and .357. With I believe only Taurus still making a .327 revolver in production. The .327 is unfortunately an unsung hero. When I begrudgingly tried to sell my Taurus M327 at a gun show, I had 12 people say "Don't you mean .357?" It is a great cartridge but I don't see Ruger picking it up again.

suemarkp
January 25, 2014, 01:13 PM
Taurus hasn't done a 32 for a few years now. I have a Taurus 327 also and would like a longer barreled gun in that caliber. We're down to the Freedom Arms 97 as about the only thing left in 327 Fed other than the single shots.

gym
January 25, 2014, 09:25 PM
History, Details, Ballistics, and Drop for the .327 Federal Magnum <!-- google_ad_client = "ca-pub-8417283882784443"; /* GunData Articles 336x280 */ google_ad_slot = "6233864047"; google_ad_width = 336; google_ad_height = 280; //--> Cartridge Type: HandgunHeight: 1.2"Width: 0.375"Average FPS: 1427Average Energy: 452Average Gr: 100Recoil: 0.67Power Rank: 2.86 of 7 [?]The .327 Federal Magnum (super magnum) is based of the .32 H&R Magnum cartridge that has much more energy, speed, and power than its parent case. The .327 Magnum was first designed just a few years ago back in 2006-2007. This cartridge has an average speed of 1427fps making it faster than most every other handgun cartridge including the fast ones like the .44 magnum (avg fps 1317) , .357 magnum (avg fps 1294) , and even the 367 sig (avg fps 1379). With 452 lbs of force at muzzle it has more energy than the 45 S&W (avg 403), the 45 GAP (avg 414) , and the 40 S&W (avg 423) There has been some hype around this cartridge stating that it's the best self defense revolver round since the 357 Magnum, and ballistic numbers alone seem to support these claims. The problem with new rounds is that they sometimes take 10, 20, maybe 30 years to gain a loyal fan base. We feel this cartridge has the potential to be very popular in the coming decades. The main benefit of this cartridge as we see them currently, is that the .327 Federal Magnum allows for 6 rounds in the smaller framed revolvers, where the .357 only allows for 6. We are all used to 6 shooters not 5 so this round is a problem solver, these "problem solving" rounds tend to do very well. We expect the popularity of the .327 Federal Magnum to boom in the near future. With it's power, size, and speed this round is bound for success.*Casing image above is an artist rendering and not a real photo of .327 Federal Magnum Ballistics cartridge. While we have went to great lengths to make sure that it's as accurate as possible this rendering should not be used to generate specs for casings. - See more at: http://gundata.org/cartridge/135/.327-federal-magnum/#sthash.LtCuBy63.dpuf

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