tips on shooting glocks


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csa77
January 21, 2014, 12:01 PM
I recently broke down and bought the gun I said Id never own, a glock. Actually a gen3 g34.

This is the first striker fired gun I have owned and it Im having alot of trouble hitting point of aim, all my shots go high and to the left. on top of that I have trouble rapidly getting the glock sights lined up(thinking about replacing them with Sevigny Comp sights). I can shoot normal hammer fired guns pretty good. Always point of aim. With my beloved Hi Power raising the gun toward the target, the sights are almost dead on even before I aim.

Im going to be attending a GSSF shoot next month and dont want to make a fool out of my self LOL. I wish I could take my hi power, I do so well with that gun.

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txgunsuscg
January 21, 2014, 12:05 PM
Rockwell Tactical has tips (Http://www.rockwelltactical.com/tips.htm) on Glock finger placement. Helped me with my drifting left.

Sam1911
January 21, 2014, 12:09 PM
Well, there's nothing awesome about the Glock factory sights. Lots of good options out there, though. Dawsons, Sevigny, Warren tactical are very good.

As far as pushing left, that's almost certainly you struggling to get used to the new trigger. Dryfire practice will help, and a bunch of repetitions of the "empty case drill" will, too. (Empty case balanced on slide, dryfire and break shot without dislodging case.)

For most GSSF stuff, getting the sights "lined up" per se shouldn't be so important as simply finding the front sight and applying proper trigger control. The distances are mostly not so great you need a lot of rear sight work.

MrBorland
January 21, 2014, 12:19 PM
I gave up on trying to figure out how to shoot a Glock to POA. I sold it and bought another striker-fired gun that didn't present an obstacle to overcome right up front. To bad, as it was otherwise a good gun.

VA27
January 21, 2014, 12:36 PM
Glocks are funny. LOTS of shooters shoot left with a new Glock. Verticle stringing can be caused by an inconsistent grip. Gotta grip it with the same pressure every shot. When you can shoot good groups (no matter where they are on the target) then you can adjust the sights for POA/POI.

Teachu2
January 21, 2014, 05:58 PM
It took me 3-400 rounds with my G34 to figure out it wasn't a 1911 and never would be - so I started playing with my grip until I found what works for me. Worked well enough that I won the first GSSF match I entered, with a 493/500.

C0untZer0
January 21, 2014, 10:12 PM
I spent a lot of time doing dry fire drills, and spent a lot of time practicing at the range with my stock Glock trigger.

Then I put a trigger kit in it and everything got better :)

GLOOB
January 21, 2014, 11:41 PM
With my beloved Hi Power raising the gun toward the target, the sights are almost dead on even before I aim.
With the Glock, work on getting your head to sit lower at least as much as you work on the grip/sights. After you get used to that, you'll find the Hi Power points low unless you stretch your neck up like a prairie dog.

FWIW, I also need to keep my trigger finger in practice to rapidly shoot a mid-frame Glock, accurately. But the G21/20 is spot on, all the time, every time. A grip enhancer of some sort might help you out.

Sebastian the Ibis
January 22, 2014, 08:57 AM
Keep your grip as high as you can consistently. Then try using the end of your finger on the trigger - think 45 degrees from your fingernail not 90. Also try shooting w your left eye completely closed, if you are not doing so already.

Dump the sights. The only reason I have factory sights on any of my glocks is that there have not been any discount aftermarket sights on the sale boards here in a while.

Sam1911
January 22, 2014, 09:02 AM
Also try shooting w your left eye completely closed, if you are not doing so already. ?

This goes directly against modern dynamic handgunning teaching (which says shoot with both eyes open unless you simply cannot), so can you explain how it would help him?

aarondhgraham
January 22, 2014, 10:17 AM
Use C-Clamps,,,
Secure them to the target rack very tightly.

Aarond

Sorry, I couldn't resist. :o

.

wally
January 22, 2014, 10:29 AM
I recently broke down and bought the gun I said Id never own, a glock. Actually a gen3 g34.

Was in the same boat until I got a gen4.

I found the 3.5lb trigger connector helped a lot with my older ones, but I'd question this setup for anything other than range use.

Hangingrock
January 22, 2014, 11:07 AM
Years more like decades in the past a PMI (Primary Marksmanship Instructor) told me the reason I was having problems because I was not following what had been taught proper instructed fundamentals'. Basic fundamentals apply to all handguns.

I've had no long term problems when transitioning to Glock. Yes there was a learning curve no more so than transitioning from a 1911A1 to a S&W 4506. Surprisingly the M&P trigger was somewhat of a nettlesome issue after using Glock's over an extended period of time. Neither are problematic now and I employ both during a firing session. That's my story and it may differ from the experience of others.

G.barnes
January 22, 2014, 04:47 PM
Upgrading the connector to one like a ghost rocket makes all the difference. I don't know anyone who likes factory glock sights. I put a set of ameriglo on mine for around 80$.

Inebriated
January 22, 2014, 05:04 PM
1, the grip angle is different on the Glock than it is on your Hi Power. Try some Grip Force Adapters, they should change the grip angle to a more 1911ish angle. New sights that work for your eyes will help a lot in sight acquisition as well.

2, get a lot of trigger time. Glocks really show flaws in trigger control. Get to the range when you can, dry fire when you can't. Dry firing will certainly show what is causing the shots to go high/left. Make sure that you're following through with the trigger, too. Hold it until it's finished recoiling, let it out til it resets, and begin another press. Using a lighter connector will only slightly mask trigger control errors.

chris in va
January 22, 2014, 05:15 PM
You're used to the famous BHP natural grip angle, like my CZ. I bought a G21sf and couldn't adapt to the mushy trigger and weird grip angle. My point shooting accuracy went out the window, so I sold it.

One of our top club shooters had the same issue and got the Timber Wolf frame for his longslide which is a normal angle.

RetiredUSNChief
January 22, 2014, 05:49 PM
I agree with Sam in post #3. You almost certainly have a problem with the differences in the new trigger.

Sit yourself down at a bench and do some very slow, careful firing with your arms/gun supported by a rest of some sort. The purpose of this is to eliminate, as much as possible, any movement other than that caused by your trigger finger. It eliminates or minimizes movement caused by heartbeat, breathing, standing unsupported, etc.

Concentrate exclusively on maintaining a proper sight picture the entire time you are slowly squeezing the trigger.

If you are able to hit point of aim under these conditions, then you've eliminated the pistol as a source of mechanical problems. Now you need to concentrate on learning what's different between this pistol and others that you've fired.

Very likely, it's the trigger pull.

I had a similar problem when I bought my third pistol many years ago (Beretta 92FS). I couldn't shoot worth a darn with is, patterns all over the target, missing the target, etc. Puzzled the heck out of me because I had absolutely no problems with my Colt 1991A1 and my AMT Automag II.

So I sit my keister down at a bench rest and did some slow fire just as I described above. I had no problems shooting point of aim then, so I figured the fault was with me. And it was.

The problem I had was the trigger pull on the Beretta is mechanically different than that of my other two pistols. The Colt and AMT triggers are of a design wherein the entire trigger moves straight back when you pull the trigger. The Beretta trigger, however, isn't designed this way: it pivots during the trigger pull.

And that pivot made all the difference in the world.

Once I understood this, then it was a simple matter of training myself by plenty of target shooting where I concentrated on a proper trigger pull for the Beretta.

Sam1911
January 22, 2014, 07:17 PM
My even better advice would be to learn to shoot DA revolvers fast and well as these problems won't ever trouble you again! :) It is actually pretty good advice, but usually requires several years longer than folks want to spend to develop the skill.

W.E.G.
January 22, 2014, 07:47 PM
With the rear sight centered in the dovetail all my Glocks shot left for me out of the box.

I adjusted the rear sight, and they now all shoot to point of aim.

Inebriated
January 22, 2014, 07:47 PM
My even better advice would be to learn to shoot DA revolvers fast and well as these problems won't ever trouble you again! :)






This! This so much!

RetiredUSNChief
January 22, 2014, 08:18 PM
My even better advice would be to learn to shoot DA revolvers fast and well as these problems won't ever trouble you again! :) It is actually pretty good advice, but usually requires several years longer than folks want to spend to develop the skill.

Is it my imagination or does this sound like the "Buy a GLOCK and forget the rest" kinda statement?

;)

AK103K
January 22, 2014, 08:29 PM
Is it my imagination or does this sound like the "Buy a GLOCK and forget the rest" kinda statement?
Its your imagination. :)

That statement applies to "all" firearms. Once you learn to shoot "DA", you loose that trigger phobia that afflicts so many. ;)

Sam1911
January 22, 2014, 08:36 PM
I never learned so much so fast about pistol shooting as I did the year I set out to shoot nothing but wheelguns in competition. One thing it did was ruin my ability/tendency to judge autopistol triggers to any fine degree. Folks say, "oh, that M&P has a terrible trigger. I can't shoot it well because it's so much worse than the perfect 1911 glass-rod break I'm used to!" And I tend to be thinking, "Uh...yeah, right, sure, whatever. :rolleyes:"

Which isn't terribly sympathetic on my part. :o

R.W.Dale
January 22, 2014, 08:41 PM
The best bit of advice I can give you is to NOT "stage" the glock trigger when trying for accuracy.
Staging a glock it similar pistol trigger is a surefire recipie for crappy accuracy

Smooth complete pulls that you don't think about and follow through on are critical.

csa77
January 23, 2014, 12:25 AM
Im not too bad with revolvers in double action, I have used my 340pd, 686 snub, and a model 29 for bowling pin(all just for fun) and done pretty good shooting them in double action, but that's only 10 yards.

Iv only shot the g34 2 times, 350 rounds each trip. 700 rounds though the g34 and still not used to it. With slow fire, standing, at 15 - 20 yards most of my shots are in the "A" ring of the NRA d1 target. all high and left. most are on the verge of exiting the A ring.

I blacked out the stock Glock sights with a magic marker today, oddly it seems to help somewhat with quicker acquisition. I know a aftermarket trigger setup or connector will help alot, but I cant use that in GSSF, at least not in class In want to try.

I think for me its the combination between the stacking in the stock trigger combined with the over travel and me not able to get a consistent grip on the gun.

Sebastian the Ibis
January 23, 2014, 12:58 AM
Also try shooting w your left eye completely closed, if you are not doing so already.
?

This goes directly against modern dynamic handgunning teaching (which says shoot with both eyes open unless you simply cannot), so can you explain how it would help him?
__________________

Sure. First, if you are cross eye dominant, you will shoot off target. Shooting with one eye closed is the easiest way to eliminate this problem. Second, standard Glock sights have a white dot and white ] shape on the black sites resulting in black-white-black-gap-black-white-black-gap-black-white-black across the middle of the sights. This can get awfully confusing and it can amplify dominance issues between the eyes.

If you are not shooting a Glock well, shoot with one eye to eliminate or minimize the issues above and see if that gets your shots where you want them. If that isolates the problem, work on it until you can shoot "modern dynamic handgun."

rskent
January 23, 2014, 04:41 AM
Rockwell Tactical has*tips*on Glock finger placement.

Thanks, interesting information. When I start to push the trigger (shoot to the left) my natural instinct is less finger, not more. I will have to try it out.

I am sure the experts will disagree with me on this. What works best for me is a hard hold. Mostly with my support hand. When I pick up a Glock I have
to remind myself that its a light gun with a heavy striker. Don’t hold it like a 1911. Hold it like a chainsaw.

RetiredUSNChief
January 23, 2014, 07:16 AM
Thanks, interesting information. When I start to push the trigger (shoot to the left) my natural instinct is less finger, not more. I will have to try it out.

I am sure the experts will disagree with me on this. What works best for me is a hard hold. Mostly with my support hand. When I pick up a Glock I have
to remind myself that its a light gun with a heavy striker. Don’t hold it like a 1911. Hold it like a chainsaw.

Hold it like a chainsaw?

Glocks have a chainsaw-style front handle mounted across the slide for a two-handed grip? :scrutiny:

Sam1911
January 23, 2014, 01:04 PM
Sure. First, if you are cross eye dominant, you will shoot off target. Shooting with one eye closed is the easiest way to eliminate this problem.
What? Why do you feel that is so? Most shooters who are cross dominant never even realize they're aligning the gun's sights with their dominant eye. It's seamless. It isn't like shooting a rifle or shotgun, where the rear of the gun is anchored to the shooter's strong-side shoulder. The cross-dominant pistol shooter just turns the gun slightly and the sights align perfectly.

I've never heard of a shooter who didn't do that instinctively.

Second, standard Glock sights have a white dot and white ] shape on the black sites resulting in black-white-black-gap-black-white-black-gap-black-white-black across the middle of the sights. This can get awfully confusing No disagreement there.

If that isolates the problem, work on it until you can shoot "modern dynamic handgun."I've not run across a cross-dominant shooter who needed coaching to get the gun turned slightly so it aligns with the correct (dominant) eye. New one on me!

Inebriated
January 23, 2014, 01:13 PM
Im not too bad with revolvers in double action, I have used my 340pd, 686 snub, and a model 29 for bowling pin(all just for fun) and done pretty good shooting them in double action, but that's only 10 yards.





Iv only shot the g34 2 times, 350 rounds each trip. 700 rounds though the g34 and still not used to it. With slow fire, standing, at 15 - 20 yards most of my shots are in the "A" ring of the NRA d1 target. all high and left. most are on the verge of exiting the A ring.





I blacked out the stock Glock sights with a magic marker today, oddly it seems to help somewhat with quicker acquisition. I know a aftermarket trigger setup or connector will help alot, but I cant use that in GSSF, at least not in class In want to try.





I think for me its the combination between the stacking in the stock trigger combined with the over travel and me not able to get a consistent grip on the gun.









pro tip, just drift the sight out and flip it around. First thing I do with glocks until I get real sights. And having a black rear helps immensely in a quick sight acquisition. Sam I believe put it best into words... Your brain tries to "read" the picture in front of you, shifting focus from front to rear. With a black rear, you kind of just see through it onto the front.

TestPilot
January 23, 2014, 07:44 PM
Posted by Sam1911:

What? Why do you feel that is so? Most shooters who are cross dominant never even realize they're aligning the gun's sights with their dominant eye. It's seamless. It isn't like shooting a rifle or shotgun, where the rear of the gun is anchored to the shooter's strong-side shoulder. The cross-dominant pistol shooter just turns the gun slightly and the sights align perfectly.

I've never heard of a shooter who didn't do that instinctively.

I can shoot either way.

I agree that it is not a problem for sports shooting.

However, I choose to use non-dominant eye closed method mostly for problems in field operations that may involve combat:

-Using dominant eye for cross eye dominant shooter would mean more body is exposed from cover.

-Adjusting posture to use dominant eye for a cross eye dominant shooter is minimal for sports shooting. However, it is not so minimal for combat shooting because the posture is more than likely already modifed to adjust for cover, etc.

Moving the gun a little for left or right and turning the head a little to make the sights align with the dominant eye is not much of an issue when in relaxed standing position. But, when the shooter is alreay leaning, compressed, etc. to adjust for cover, lack of space, etc., then it does become an issue. It also falls apart easier when moving.

I am right handed for shooting with right dominant eye. However, I have a cross eye dominant issue when shooting left handed.

When I use my left hand, I sometimes align the pistol to my right eye, just as you said. However, that is only when I am just shooting in a relazed standing position. The reason why I switch to my left hand is to utlize a left edge of a cover. When I start using left edge of a cover, the very awkward and stained feeling, and the double vision of the cover which is even more bother some(since my dominant eye is on the right), nearly immedeately tells me something is wrong.

Deaf Smith
January 23, 2014, 07:45 PM
tips on shooting glocks

Aim strait, squeeze the trigger when the sighs are on the target.

Index and trigger control. Those are the keys to shooting any gun well.

Deaf

Sam1911
January 23, 2014, 07:54 PM
Using dominant eye for cross eye dominant shooter would mean more body is exposed from cover.
How would this mean more body is exposed from cover, necessarily? Cover happens on either side of the body. You might have to lean either way. An argument can be made that you might choose to switch shoulders in long-gun shooting to take maximum advantage of cover, and I've been trained to do so by several instructors. But with pistols, the required adjustment is so very minor that most folks do it without ever realizing it -- and most observers would never be able to tell that they are doing it. It's a really small adjustment of about 2 degrees of "yaw" in the position of the pistol in the hands.

The adjustment required is far less disruptive to the shooting position than the required extra lean out one must make to shoot around cover on their non-dominant side. (See here: http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=672216 Compare posts 23 and 25)

So I don't understand your contention here. Or rather, having practiced a lot of cover shooting equally on either side, I've never seen or even imagined such a problem.

Moving the gun a little for left or right and turning the head a little to make the sights align with the dominant eye is not much of an issue when in relaxed standing position. But, when the shooter is alreay leaning, compressed, etc. to adjust for cover, lack of space, etc., then it does become an issue. It also falls apart easier when moving.That's almost the only kind of shooting I do. Practical, dynamic, match shooting and defensive training. Around cover, on the move, in/under/over obstacles, vehicles, etc. I have relatively little "relaxed standing position" shooting experience, unless you count a few seasons of PPC league a decade ago. So my comments and suggestions come entirely from the point of view of fast-paced, mobile, out-of-position shooting.

Honestly, maybe I need you to explain what changes in body position would be required that would put you more out from behind cover? That's what I just can't see. All you're doing is closing one eye, or not. There really shouldn't be any difference in body position at all.

TestPilot
January 23, 2014, 08:12 PM
Posted by Sam1911:
How would this mean more body is exposed from cover, necessarily? Cover happens on either side of the body. You might have to lean either way. An argument can be made that you might choose to switch shoulders in long-gun shooting to take maximum advantage of cover, and I've been trained to do so by several instructors. But with pistols, the required adjustment is so very minor that most folks do it without ever realizing it -- and most observers would never be able to tell that they are doing it. It's a really small adjustment of about 2 degrees of "yaw" in the position of the pistol in the hands.
...


When right eye is exposed with the pistol in right hand, head area containing only one eye needs to be exposed.

When dominant left eye is exposed with the pistol in the right hand, the area of the head containing both eyes must be exposed.

Yes, I may have to lean either way, but it does not change the fact that both eyes area of the face exposed is larger than only one eye area of the face exposed.

When I utlize cover, I make it so that only my one eye and my gun muzzle and some body parts around it that I cannot avoid exposing would be visble.

I can't comment on your use of cover, since I've never seen it, but when I see people in IDPA and IPSC "use cover," my feeling about it is "what cover?"

That is not because IDPA and IPSC shooters are stupid. The reason is simple. It is nearly impossible to win a match utilizing cover to the degree that I do.

rskent
January 23, 2014, 08:47 PM
RetiredUSNChief

I guess I should have said “hold on tight”. My Bad.

RetiredUSNChief
January 23, 2014, 09:48 PM
RetiredUSNChief

I guess I should have said “hold on tight”. My Bad.

No worries! It was a funny image in my mind trying to picture how to hold the Glock in a two-handed chainsaw kinda grip!

;)

Sam1911
January 23, 2014, 09:58 PM
When right eye is exposed with the pistol in right hand, head area containing only one eye needs to be exposed.

When dominant left eye is exposed with the pistol in the right hand, the area of the head containing both eyes must be exposed.

Yes, I may have to lean either way, but it does not change the fact that both eyes area of the face exposed is larger than only one eye area of the face exposed.
I totally get that, and agree. My point is this: If you are equally likely to have to use cover on either side, then you are equally likely to have to expose half of your face as you are all of your face -- regardless of which way your eyes and hands agree or disagree.

If a right-handed cross-dominant shooter has to lean LEFT instead of right, then s/he only has to expose the left side of his/her face.

Or, if a left-handed but right-eye dominant shooter has to lean RIGHT instead of left, same thing happens.

Therefore, there is no NET advantage to limiting yourself by closing an eye. You're equally likely to have to lean either way, and so, to have to expose half or all of your head to acquire a firing picture.

In fact, I'm really not sure how closing or not closing the eye changes anything at all. You're STILL using your dominant EYE ... right? :uhoh:


When I utlize cover, I make it so that only my one eye and my gun muzzle and some body parts around it that I cannot avoid exposing would be visble.
Ok, I don't disagree with that at all, though I think you'll find that in practice it isn't quite so cut and dried as all that. It's a fine goal if you have the time to position yourself perfectly, but in a dynamic situation you pie and shoot in, hopefully, a fluid enough motion that you really aren't exposing degree-by-degree. After all, most cover is really concealment only. Just because someone can't clearly see every inch of your face, doesn't mean they can't put bullets through the corner and screw up your day if they can see that you're standing there. Using cover is probably best accomplished -- in the types of situations we appear to be discussing -- with some haste.

I can't comment on your use of cover, since I've never seen itI provided a link.

...but when I see people in IDPA and IPSC "use cover," my feeling about it is "what cover?"Well, you won't see anyone in IPSC using cover, because the concept does not exist in that sport. In IDPA, I completely agree. The use of cover is often applied extremely loosely. It should be 1/2 of the upper torso and all legs/feet completely in the shadow of cover -- that's an attainable goal for someone trying to balance staying out of view with getting shots on threats in a timely fashion. Many times in competition it is called far too loosely. We're working on that, but there's miles to go.

But none of that is influenced by whether you close one eye, so the point is rather moot.

Sam1911
January 23, 2014, 10:03 PM
No worries! It was a funny image in my mind trying to picture how to hold the Glock in a two-handed chainsaw kinda grip!

Hey, belay that talk! Mossberg might hear you and we don't need to be giving them any more ideas... :scrutiny:

TestPilot
January 24, 2014, 01:16 AM
Posted by Sam1911:
If a right-handed cross-dominant shooter has to lean LEFT instead of right, then s/he only has to expose the left side of his/her face.

Or, if a left-handed but right-eye dominant shooter has to lean RIGHT instead of left, same thing happens.

Therefore, there is no NET advantage to limiting yourself by closing an eye. You're equally likely to have to lean either way, and so, to have to expose half or all of your head to acquire a firing picture.

In fact, I'm really not sure how closing or not closing the eye changes anything at all. You're STILL using your dominant EYE ... right?

Oh, that is what is not communicated.

No. I use right eye with right hand, and left eye with left hand.

Sam1911
January 24, 2014, 08:06 AM
Oh.

You don't change hands when approaching cover with a handgun, do you? So I still don't see why this is an issue. I guess I'm still completely confused.

TestPilot
January 24, 2014, 07:43 PM
Posted by Sam1911:
You don't change hands when approaching cover with a handgun, do you? So I still don't see why this is an issue. I guess I'm still completely confused.

I do change hand if situation allows time for it.

It's the same doctrine as switching side the sholder a rifle stock is on as approaching different side edge of a cover.

Dominant eye is completely irrelevant for this method, since this method cannot always align sights with the dominant eye.

I just looked at the picture on the link you provided, and the way I do it would look like when the cover is not crowded when the shooter is usling the right hand, and when the left hand used, it would look like the mirror image of when the right hand is used.

hentown
January 25, 2014, 09:01 AM
Stage the first trigger pull; hold the trigger back after the first shot is fired. Slowly release trigger until you feel a "click". Fire from that "reset" position for subsequent shots.

Practice.

Sam1911
January 25, 2014, 10:03 AM
I do change hand if situation allows time for it.

It's the same doctrine as switching side the sholder a rifle stock is on as approaching different side edge of a cover.

That's an interesting choice, and I think its utility, appropriateness, and application should be explored more fully. However, this isn't the thread for it, so let's not pursue it further here.

RetiredUSNChief
January 25, 2014, 04:54 PM
Hey, belay that talk! Mossberg might hear you and we don't need to be giving them any more ideas... :scrutiny:

HAH!

Now I have to clean Coke of my computer screen...thanks! That stuff burns coming out the nose...;)

Sebastian the Ibis
January 26, 2014, 12:12 PM
I've not run across a cross-dominant shooter who needed coaching to get the gun turned slightly so it aligns with the correct (dominant) eye. New one on me!

I used to be one myself, and I ran across another at the range last weekend. I used to have much better vision in my non-dominant eye than my dominant eye, so my point of aim would switches depending on what I exactly I was focusing on. My right eye was dominant at short ranges, my left eye was quasi-dominant at longer ranges. Even if I was trying to focus on the front sight, I'd have to focus on a small bulls-eye to some degree in order to see it so my point of aim would shift. Even though I am right handed, and right eye-dominant, I got my rifle merit badge shooting left handed since that was the only way I could see the target.

Now I wear prescription lenses when shooting which corrects the above. I train without them from time to time- but I keep one eye closed and know that I am shooting minute of man.

The guy at the range last week was cross-eye dominant, I think, he certainly had dominance issues, he was constantly squinting. Even if he tried shooting both eyes open, he was all over the place. When he shot with one eye - his groups tightened up.

After reading the OPs subsequent posts, I doubt that he is an inexperienced shooter. However, when I am working with new shooters I always look at their eyes to see if they are having dominance issues- just after I make sure that their thumb is not behind the slide, and they are gripping the gun correctly.

Sam1911
January 26, 2014, 12:15 PM
Ahhh, I see what you're saying. Yes, if you're having trouble consistently "picking" a dominant eye, closing one gets you by.

I prefer a bit of scotch tape or a smudge of vaseline on the non-dominant glasses lens as that keeps the peripheral vision and balance up to par but kills the tendency for that eye to fight for dominance.

Hangingrock
January 26, 2014, 04:55 PM
This topic seems to no longer be Tips On Shooting Glock's.

HexHead
January 26, 2014, 05:58 PM
Worked well enough that I won the first GSSF match I entered, with a 493/500.

I've never seen that kind of scoring at a GSSF match. Usually the lowest time wins. You're shooting against the clock and seconds are added for shots outside the zero zone, misses or penalties.

HexHead
January 26, 2014, 06:01 PM
Upgrading the connector to one like a ghost rocket makes all the difference. I don't know anyone who likes factory glock sights. I put a set of ameriglo on mine for around 80$.
You can't use a ghost rocket in a GSSF match, other than sights or Pierce grip extensions, only Glock parts are allowed, unless shooting in the Unlimited division. Then you'll be competing against the shooters with race guns. Good luck with that.

TestPilot
January 26, 2014, 08:34 PM
This topic seems to no longer be Tips On Shooting Glock's.
There's nothing much in terms of shooting principles that applies exclusively to Glocks.

I've been shooting one for 4 years, and the only advice I have aside from building on basic pistol shooting skills is to build index finger strength, not particulary because the Glock trigger is heavy, but because the break is more rough than any other striker fired pistols I've shot so more force is required to keep the "break" in control.

Hangingrock
January 26, 2014, 11:20 PM
TestPilot: There's nothing much in terms of shooting principles that applies exclusively to Glocks.

You'll excuse my sarcasm and for that I apologize, but you made my point.

Teachu2
January 26, 2014, 11:31 PM
I've never seen that kind of scoring at a GSSF match. Usually the lowest time wins. You're shooting against the clock and seconds are added for shots outside the zero zone, misses or penalties.
The Indoor match rules are completely different.

gym
January 26, 2014, 11:40 PM
You probably know this already but it sounds like your sights are set up for the 6 o'clock

engineer88
January 27, 2014, 02:22 AM
Sam1911 beat me to it. I cut my teeth on 12+ pound DAO and now Glock, XDs, etc feel like single action. :-)

Beentown
January 27, 2014, 12:18 PM
Ahhh, I see what you're saying. Yes, if you're having trouble consistently "picking" a dominant eye, closing one gets you by.

I prefer a bit of scotch tape or a smudge of vaseline on the non-dominant glasses lens as that keeps the peripheral vision and balance up to par but kills the tendency for that eye to fight for dominance.

I have to do the same. I have trained my eyes to go right eye dominate on command, most of the time. Since it is most of the time I still use Scotch tape for the occasional two foot miss to the left....

Vodoun da Vinci
January 27, 2014, 01:17 PM
Never had much time for Glocks since they were invented - never shot one nor wanted one nor any other plastic gun. Then last Summer my Wife and I vowed to find pistols that worked well for ourselves and shot everything we could rent, borrow, or buy to find that gun.

I borrowed a G26 and from the moment I shot it I started kicking myself because in my hands it was the most accurate auto I had ever shot. So I bought a Glock 26 Gen4 and I love it. It is the gun I compare others I try to now.

My background was always revolvers and my Wife influenced me to shoot them only DA as that was the way her father taught her. Both of us have no/had no problems making the Glock work for us.

I think training on a DA revolver could be considered "cross training" for learning to deal with any handgun trigger that may be "different" than perfect. DA only revolvers make you understand bone deep how it works but it takes a lot of rounds down range to do that.

IMO/YMMV.

VooDoo

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