Repairing wood forearm


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Katitmail
January 21, 2014, 06:18 PM
I'm in a process of refinishing wood for Remington 11-48 and I did drop front grip while handling :( Today I sanded it and noticed 2 cracks :(

What is the best way to repair those? I'm not really concerned in making it look 100% but I want this repair to last. Any suggestions?

Putting so much effort in refinishing and this..

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4v50 Gary
January 21, 2014, 06:26 PM
Acraglas.

SilentScream
January 21, 2014, 06:31 PM
The way I repair cracks like that is VERY gently splay open the cracks. While they're open force in either bedding compound or wood glue. Bedding compound is preferred as it's more durable. Once you have a good amount of your chosen adhesive; wipe away any excess and gently clamp it with light pressure. Let sit/cure for at least 48hrs.

RetiredUSNChief
January 21, 2014, 06:45 PM
^^^^

Bingo.

If I might also add...when SilentScream says "clamp it with light pressure", that's exactly what you should do. Only enough pressure to firmly seat the two parts together and no more. Extra pressure unnaturally stresses the wood and forces additional adhesive out of the bonding area. Unclamping pieces which are glued together with excessive clamping pressure may result in the glued pieces remaining in a stressed condition, which means they'll be exerting some pressure to relieve this stress...and may lead to premature cracking of the repair site as a result.

rcmodel
January 21, 2014, 07:12 PM
No way I have ever been able to get wood glue or epoxy in a crack that small without completely breaking it apart and starting with two pieces again!

Here's what you need to use.

http://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-tools-supplies/stock-work-finishing/glue-adhesives/hot-stuff-instant-glue-prod13081.aspx

This is thin like water, and will wick into a crack all the way to the microscopic start of it.
And it sets up instantly so prolonged clamping is not needed.

You can buy it at any hobby shop, and most craft stores.


rc

RetiredUSNChief
January 21, 2014, 08:13 PM
No way I have ever been able to get wood glue or epoxy in a crack that small without completely breaking it apart and starting with two pieces again!

Here's what you need to use.

http://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-tools-supplies/stock-work-finishing/glue-adhesives/hot-stuff-instant-glue-prod13081.aspx

This is thin like water, and will wick into a crack all the way to the microscopic start of it.
And it sets up instantly so prolonged clamping is not needed.

You can buy it at any hobby shop, and most craft stores.


rc

Sure you can, and without resorting to any special glues! Though certainly I won't bash any such glues that experience demonstrates adequate to the task.

All you really have to do is slightly flex the wood...not even necessarily enough to create more than the tinest of crack expansions. Spread a bead of glue along the crack on one side, exert some flex to the wood, and work the glue into the crack using a thumb/finger to mash, press, or otherwise massage the glue down into the crack.

It's quite amazing how much glue you can work into the tiniest of cracks this way.

Katitmail
January 21, 2014, 08:16 PM
I already did. All I had to do is to squeeze handle and those cracks opened up slightly. I rubbed carpenters glue in them and released pressure. Some glue squeezed off. Maybe won't be as strong as epoxy, but I think it should work fine because I squeezed with considerable force and it didn't crack any further. No clamping necessary.

I will sand those spots and continue with finishing tomorrow..

RetiredUSNChief
January 21, 2014, 08:45 PM
Sweet! Let us know how it turns out!

Jim K
January 21, 2014, 09:28 PM
FWIW, I strongly suspect those cracks have been there, you just didn't notice them until you got into refinishing the wood.

Jim

Katitmail
January 21, 2014, 09:36 PM
No, I did inspect all very close. There was 2 cracks before, very small. Those are from dropping...

MuffinMaster
February 15, 2014, 02:50 AM
This will creep into anything almost:
http://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/product.do?part=38224&engine=adwords!6456&keyword=product_ad&type=pla

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