Smith model 17-8 found, thoughts


PDA






bikemutt
January 25, 2014, 07:15 PM
Well, once again I was left unsupervised for an hour or so, where do I end up, a gun store :evil::evil:

Under glass is a S&W revolver that begged to be examined, a model 17-8 in mint condition chambered for 10 rounds of 22lr. I've been looking to round out my ways of sending 22lr lead downrange so it didn't really seem a bad idea to check this one out.

I know the store owners well and the one who handed it to me said this one has an alloy cylinder. When I pressed for more information he said I should research it.

So here I am with the best research team on planet earth, THR. They want $600 for it. What's the deal with the alloy cylinder and is it worth the price?

http://i497.photobucket.com/albums/rr338/hcedmondson/20140125_134602_zps06c8bad9.jpg (http://s497.photobucket.com/user/hcedmondson/media/20140125_134602_zps06c8bad9.jpg.html)

http://i497.photobucket.com/albums/rr338/hcedmondson/20140125_134623_zps42aba74e.jpg (http://s497.photobucket.com/user/hcedmondson/media/20140125_134623_zps42aba74e.jpg.html)

If you enjoyed reading about "Smith model 17-8 found, thoughts" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
Radagast
January 25, 2014, 09:52 PM
The Model 17-8 Ten Round Model was manufactured 1996-1999. 6 inch full lug barrel, glass bead blast blue finish, 10 shot aluminum alloy cylinder, target hammer and trigger, drilled and tapped for scope mounts, round butt, synthetic grips, MIM thumb piece.
Serial number on that gun dates it to January 1996.
I've only seen one, the bluing on the cylinder had turned plum colored after much shooting. I've read that it is a black anodizing rather than a bluing.

rcmodel
January 25, 2014, 09:58 PM
+1

It would have to be anodizing, as aluminum cannot be blued using conventional bluing methods.

rc

orionengnr
January 25, 2014, 10:01 PM
For that price I would be looking for an earlier M17/M18.

AFDavis11
January 25, 2014, 10:07 PM
Well, you can pay $600. You'll be saving tons on ammo thats hard to find.

Jim K
January 25, 2014, 10:22 PM
You might find an earlier one for about the same price but it would be a six shot. Your decision.

Jim

Driftwood Johnson
January 25, 2014, 11:00 PM
Howdy

Frankly, I should think you could do better than that. You should be able to find a nice blued six shot 'real' model 17, all steel, for that price. I do have one of the more recent 10 shot Stainless Model 617, but I seldom shoot it. I really prefer the classics.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v495/Driftwood_Johnson/smith%20and%20wesson/k22m1761701.jpg

Kernel
January 26, 2014, 12:03 AM
The fact that it's pre-safety and a 10 shot would be pluses to me. Price is right there where I see'em in the retail market. The configuration is kind of scarce, but the price is every-day.

Old Fuff
January 26, 2014, 12:52 PM
I would be concerned about what are probably nit-picks. Well anyway...

I don't like soft aluminum cylinders because with hard use - in particular fast double-action shooting - the notches in the cylinder will get battered and peened out on the edges.

That heavy full-length underlug on the barrel is going to get heavy after awhile.

If the revolver represents something you really like, the price is high, but not too high. As for myself, I would look for an earlier gun with a 6-shot steel cylinder. A a practical matter I see no advantage in a 10-shot capacity in a revolver that would be used mostly at a shooting range or in the field.

bikemutt
January 26, 2014, 01:12 PM
What caught my attention was the 10 rounds, that puts it on par with my Ruger 22/45 and Browning Buckmark. I can imagine the three guns in a fun rotation at the range.

The full underlug is eye candy for me, shallow, I know. It may though, offset the weight of an optic from a balance perspective.

My only concern is that alloy cylinder; that coupled with the seller's seeming trepidation about said alloy, and he almost seemed reluctant to put it on hold for me, like he's trying to tell me something. If I decide to pursue it, I'll just flat out ask him to lay out the cards,

snorko
January 26, 2014, 02:33 PM
I have a 17-8 I bought like new, used in 1998. Shot a lot of bowling pins and steel with it over the years and it has been great. As has been pointed out, the configuration was short lived and is rare. While prices can seem high, $600 is in line with what those on armslist and gunbroker are dancing around.

bannockburn
January 26, 2014, 03:41 PM
For my own personal preferences, I would look for an older 6 shot Model 17. Just like the classics better.

John C
January 26, 2014, 04:43 PM
While I agree with the others that the older Model 17's and 18's have more soul, I think this one would be a great shooter. I'd buy it, and I already have a 17-3. I think that you'll never go wrong buying a pre-lock, pre-MIM Smith for a reasonable price.

The 10 shooters benefit from less cylinder rotation during double action fire. This makes the trigger pull better than the 6 shot versions.

-John

slickracer
January 26, 2014, 04:57 PM
I would be all over that for $600. If you have any issues with the cylinder S&W will fit 10 shot stainless cylinder free of charge.

bikemutt
January 26, 2014, 05:21 PM
The 10 shooters benefit from less cylinder rotation during double action fire. This makes the trigger pull better than the 6 shot versions.

That explains why I had an instant affinity for the action. I wasn't allowed to dry fire it, nor would I. However, I placed a finger in the way of the hammer once it came back far enough and was floored by how nice the trigger was, especially for a rimfire.

I have a feeling $600 is going to be floating out of my wallet come Tuesday :barf::)

Master Blaster
January 26, 2014, 07:32 PM
I own a 1971 model 43 air weight kit gun version of the model 37. I have put several thousand rounds through it and have yet to appreciably wear the aluminum cylinder. Go for it, if anything the timing will last longer as the lighter cylinder will put less wear on the hand. BTW most cars made today have an aluminum alloy engine block. It seems to outlast the old cast iron block engines by about 2X the mileage without a rebuild. Should you ever wear out the cylinder S&w will replace it under warranty.

Hoppes Love Potion
January 26, 2014, 10:46 PM
There's a reason S&W stopped making the alloy cylinders. I think it was due to extraction problems when the metal heats up.

bikemutt
January 27, 2014, 08:45 AM
There's a reason S&W stopped making the alloy cylinders. I think it was due to extraction problems when the metal heats up.
A friend who is fluent in Smith-speak told me the same thing; difficulty with extraction.

I read another review last night of a 6-shot model where the shooter said that unless you're prepared to stop and clean the cylinders bores every 100 rounds you will run into extraction problems anyway simply because of the dirty nature of .22lr.

I'm starting to wonder if .22lr in a target revolver is a good idea for me.

Hoppes Love Potion
January 27, 2014, 11:47 AM
One of the reasons for the outstanding accuracy of the K-22 models is the very tight cylinder holes. Combine this with the variable quality and lubrication of rimfire ammo and there can be insertion or extraction problems even with the forged steel cylinders. My 17-3 did show this tendency when I first got it, but usage and cleaning has largely eliminated the problem. The accuracy is still excellent and I rarely get sticky shell casings now.

John C
January 28, 2014, 02:42 AM
A friend who is fluent in Smith-speak told me the same thing; difficulty with extraction.

I read another review last night of a 6-shot model where the shooter said that unless you're prepared to stop and clean the cylinders bores every 100 rounds you will run into extraction problems anyway simply because of the dirty nature of .22lr.

I'm starting to wonder if .22lr in a target revolver is a good idea for me.

Yes, I find that to be true with my .22 revolvers. However, with a 10 shot revolver you'll get 66% more shots in before you need to clean the chambers. It's not difficult, just run a bore brush through the holes.

It is a downside to .22 revolvers, but the wonderful accuracy makes up for it. You will really be treating yourself if you buy it.

aHFo3
January 28, 2014, 09:59 AM
I passed on the same model gun last week. It had some anodizing wear on the cylinder and some peening. No box, just the revolver for $575.

TUBBY1
January 28, 2014, 10:58 AM
I bought a 17-8 new in 1998 and it's my favorite revolver! Anyone who's fired it loves it. I've run a brick through without incident. Highly recommend it. Good shooting

bikemutt
January 28, 2014, 05:37 PM
Well, I went and bought that darn revolver just now. Didn't even realize it's a round butt until I pulled the Hogue grip.

Now to find a nice Ahrends Retro Combat set for it. Thanks for all the advise THR!

Radagast
January 28, 2014, 06:31 PM
Congrats. Don't forget to post a range report!

If you enjoyed reading about "Smith model 17-8 found, thoughts" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!