Your hunting boots?


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andrewdl007
January 25, 2014, 10:57 PM
What boots do you wear when you hunt and what kind of hunting is it? Do you go for classics or modern boots? When I duck hunt I wear Bean Boots and leather lace-ups during quail hunting.

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gbran
January 25, 2014, 11:08 PM
70% of my hunting is in tennis shoes, the balance in insulated GorTex style boots.

rcmodel
January 25, 2014, 11:41 PM
And old pair of Wolverene Gore-Tex leather lace-up's for upland game.

Muck Boots for wet, or insulated LaCrosse® Alpha Burly's for very cold & wet.

Tennis shoes?
Seriously? :what:

You got no snakes, cactus, nettles, corn stubble, sand burs, mud, or Snakes where you hunt?

rc

mnhntr
January 25, 2014, 11:49 PM
Lacrosse Alpha Burley in the early season and Danner Insulated Pronghorns in the late season.

gbran
January 25, 2014, 11:57 PM
You got no snakes, cactus, nettles, corn stubble, sand burs, mud, or Snakes where you hunt?

I'm in central CA. I generally hunt in the lower Sierra's, up to about 5,500 feet. I hunt quail, turkey, squirrel, deer. Tennis shoes are fine until it gets wet or too cold.

Generally when out of state it's boots, but I do have a nice area in TX that tennis shoes ar OK.

I hate boots.

LRShooting
January 26, 2014, 12:24 AM
I hunt with either 11$ walmart "servus" mud boots or a 200$ pair of danners (just work boots). Mud boots usually are for anything below 35 degrees with 2 pair of socks and anytime its gonna be muddy. Work boots for all else. Never had an issue yet. Oh, and if you go hunting for fish in the river, a old pair of tennis shoes without laces that are 2-3 sizes too small are perfect!

redneck2
January 26, 2014, 06:12 AM
For deer during cold weather (typically down to maybe zero) I just got a pair of Irish Setter insulated/gore-tex on sale at Cabelas a few years ago. They are warm even sitting on stand. I like them a lot. Weaved nylon so they are not heavy.

I had some Rockies years ago. No good. Way heavy and never were waterproof.

For turkey in the spring I use slip on rubber knee boots.

Robert
January 26, 2014, 09:06 AM
Schnee Hunter II 13" for anything in and around snow. Absolute best pac boot available anywhere. For dry days I have a pair of Danner Full Curl. I do almost all my hunting in the high rocky mountains. Depending on the weather and snow I sometimes get above tree line.

ETSU_Gal
January 26, 2014, 09:09 AM
L.L. Bean! They are expensive, but SO worth it. If you use them only for hunting, they will last forever.

Sav .250
January 26, 2014, 09:15 AM
Have to be water-proof. Insulated. Light as possible. Good sole design.

Lots of boots match those basic requirements so price is another consideration.

If they look good.............they get in front of the line.

Deer hunting mostly.

jmr40
January 26, 2014, 09:43 AM
Currently these for light duty deer, small game and turkey hunting

http://www.rei.com/product/780681/salomon-quest-4d-gtx-hiking-boots-mens

And these for rougher terrain.

http://www.backcountry.com/lowa-banff-pro-backpacking-boot-mens

I've pretty much given up on boots marketed to hunters. Most are only interested in which camo pattern they can make them in instead of building a quality, comfortable boot. I've found that I don't need insulated boots with good wool socks down to about zero and the same money buys me a much higher quality hiker. Never hunted in temps below zero so I may have to reconsider if I ever do.

I use gaiters in snow or rain and wear rubber hip boots for waterfowl hunting.

Been using various hikers for over 15 years now, but I have found some deals on a few pairs of military surplus boots lately that I occasionally wear.

hunttheevil
January 26, 2014, 09:48 AM
Lacrosse snake boots. Too many creepy crawlers around here!

oneounceload
January 26, 2014, 10:01 AM
I have two pairs of insulated US-made Danners, one with 200 grams for chilly weather, and one with 800 grams for much colder weather. Both are waterproof and they will last forever with a modicum of care

627PCFan
January 26, 2014, 10:37 AM
For dry hunting I use a pair of 8 inch Redwings with custom insoles. They are on year 6, and decided to try a pair of Irish Setter Wingshooter boots this year and Im not happy with them. They might be owned by Redwing but they arent redwings for sure. If there's mud I use Lacrosse Aeroheads.

Arkansas Paul
January 26, 2014, 11:18 AM
I have a pair of lace up water proof 600 gram Thinsulate boots made by Browning.
They're okay, but I plan to upgrade to a good pair of Mucks.

lpsharp88
January 26, 2014, 01:00 PM
I just use my old military issue Gore-Tex lined boots. Water proof and warm enough to keep me happy. No complaints

der Teufel
January 26, 2014, 02:52 PM
I have a pair of Doc Marten's ankle boots that I picked up at a garage sale a few years ago for $5. They're the most comfortable pair of boots I've ever owned.

Zeke/PA
January 26, 2014, 03:29 PM
For cold weather deer hunting I have a pair of Sorels with the felt liners that are at least 30 years old. I've worn them only for hunting and kept the tops treated with Mink Oil. An older pair if leathers ( Woods & Stream)? fill the bill for not so cold hunts but once again the Mink Oil is used.

d2wing
January 26, 2014, 03:37 PM
I go through lots of boots bird hunting. My favorites are the Browning green kangaroo skin boots with thinsulate and goretex. Cabelas sells them under their own brand as well. I haven't seen them lately and my last pair is Danner pronghorns. I wear different heavier boots for deer season usually. It is wet a lot here in Minnesota and often cold with ice and snow. I never wear rubber boots anymore.

MrBorland
January 26, 2014, 04:23 PM
My last pair of boots have been Thorogoods (http://www.weinbrennerusa.com/), and I'm a fan. I wear their 6" Job Pro (http://www.weinbrennerusa.com/dspNavCategory.cfm?rootID=1&catID=138&prodid=633) for much of my shooting activities, including hunting, though their 9" Navigator (http://www.weinbrennerusa.com/dspNavCategory.cfm?rootID=124&catID=125&prodid=645) might be the better pure hunting boot. Either way, good quality, comfort, price, and made in the USA to...um..."boot". :D

Ankeny
January 26, 2014, 04:36 PM
I have flat feet and my feet are wide across the toes. For that reason, I wear Danner boots. They have a couple of models that fit well, the Pronghorn and the 453 GTX. I am on my third set of GTX boots. I also have a pair of Danner Osprey boots. I think I am going to try Lowa when my Pronghorn boots wear out.

bannockburn
January 26, 2014, 04:45 PM
For most of the time a pair of Rocky Portland boots will do. Waterproof and insulated with a fairly aggressive tread pattern. Cold winter weather calls for an old pair of Sorel boots that I have had for many years. The only thing I have had to replace is the felt liner inserts.

matrem
January 26, 2014, 05:03 PM
Mostly 6" uninsulated Red Wings for g-hogs and 18" Alpha Burly's for bow hunting.

A pair of Goretex lined Merrell's proved to be great for the October "black powder" season here this past fall.

As I see it, I have as much right to situation specific "huntin" boots as my wife has to situation specific "dress" shoes.

LSMS
January 26, 2014, 05:53 PM
Muck Arctic Pro for cold weather. Spring Turkey and early bow season I have a pair of lightweight Rocky lace ups. Not sure of model but they're pretty much a high top tennis shoe with boot treads.

skiking
January 26, 2014, 07:07 PM
I wear Zamberlan 996 Vioz GT boots. Love the support they provide, they make side hilling with 100lbs of elk meat on your back almost enjoyable. Feet stay dry and warm and feet don't get fatigued hiking up and down mountains all week.

IlikeSA
January 26, 2014, 07:11 PM
I like Danner's as well. I use an old pair of my Danner work boots, and in the snow and ice, add a pair of ice cleats.

samort457
January 26, 2014, 08:31 PM
Because there is a distinct chance of having to track my game through a rather large creek I wear 18 inch 2,000 gram insulated waders for all of my hunting except for upland, in which case I were hiking or work boots.

35 Whelen
January 26, 2014, 08:50 PM
Lace up Bean Boots here for most all hunting where lots of walking is involved. If it's cold out or I'm hunting the mountains, I add wool socks.

Today I went on a trek looking for squirrel on the creek north of the house. Without thinking I pulled on my crepe sole work boots and took out with a full size bolt action .22 LR slung over my left shoulder and my Uberti SA .44 Special on my hip (there's plenty of hogs on the creek) Well, 4+ miles later my feet were screaming "why didn't you wear the Bean Boots!

35W

natman
January 26, 2014, 09:27 PM
For most hunting in CA you need UNinsulated boots. For 90% of my hunting I wear a pair of Goretex Rocky boots with a lug sole. For hunting in snow I have a pair of 400 gram Chippewa Thinsulate boots with bob soles. I also have a pair of pac boots that I inherited from my Dad, but I've never hunted where it was cold enough to warrant wearing them yet.

CApighunter
January 29, 2014, 10:21 PM
If I'm gonna be doing a lot of walking over rough terrain, I'll wear my Columbia 8 inch hiking boots. Served me well on a 100+ mile backpacking trip. If its just a little walking on flat ground I'll just wear my Ariat Roper boots that I wear every day.

Deadeyejedi
January 30, 2014, 09:47 PM
Had a pair of 1000gram rocky hunting boots for ten years they stayed water proof and were comfortable from day one . When it came time to replace them I thought I would buy American so went with danner what a mistake two seasons and they're still not broke in they rub my right ankle raw after a long day of hunting. My son took over the old Rockies and loves them .go figure

35 Whelen
January 30, 2014, 10:01 PM
I've found that my hunting boots have to be a series of compromises. I want traction, but boots with heavy lug soles are noisy to walk in and when I elk hunt I don't want lugs hanging up in the stirrups if/when a horse/mule spooks and things go south. I like warm boots but insulated boots are heavy.

As I mentioned earlier, I found the original LL Beans to be a good compromise. They're light and easy to walk in, they're not insulated, but good wool socks remedy that. They're relatively thin so they slip in and out of stirrups easily. They're not much good in the area of traction, but I can usually overcome that problem by choosing where and how I walk.

35W

almostfree
January 30, 2014, 10:19 PM
Lowa Tibet GTX for working, hiking and hunting. After trying several different brands, I found that they are the most comfortable boots that I have had so far.

heathkiks
January 30, 2014, 10:38 PM
Ha, Lowa Tibets are indeed awesome. I have some and love em.

I also use Kenetrek boots. I am sold on mountaineering, goretex type boots with gators in almost all conditions. You never know when you may have to pack out with 120lb over loose scree

Of course I am kind of a gear junky.

Captcurt
January 31, 2014, 09:51 AM
I have two pairs of insulated US-made Danners, one with 200 grams for chilly weather, and one with 800 grams for much colder weather. Both are waterproof and they will last forever with a modicum of care
Danners. I have tried others and always go back to Danners.

Hawk 3/21
January 31, 2014, 10:12 AM
I like the thorogoods too. Used the uniforms for work & pretty mutch all outdoor activity. Haven't been able to replace them, Sears had another brand by then. For cold activities I believe I have the best boots ever made. The name eludes me because they are from 1994-5. If you saw the movie Fargo, every one wore them. Eight winters in the alps, cutting wood, hiking, sledding.....well everything. They still wear like new and I've probably been out in -10º for 4+ hours at a time without a problem. Old style water proof using bees wax & hair dryer.

Hawk 3/21
January 31, 2014, 10:15 AM
I like the thorogoods too. Used the uniforms for work & pretty mutch all outdoor activity. Haven't been able to replace them, Sears had another brand by then. For cold activities I believe I have the best boots ever made. The name eludes me because they are from 1994-5. If you saw the movie Fargo, every one wore them. Eight winters in the alps, cutting wood, hiking, sledding.....well everything. They still wear like new and I've probably been out in -10º for 4+ hours at a time without a problem. Old style water proof using bees wax & hair dryer.

Crazy way life goes, the one time I had to over night on a glacier they weren't on my feet. Summer







I like the thorogoods too. Used the uniforms for work & pretty mutch all outdoor activity. Haven't been able to replace them, Sears had another brand by then. For cold activities I believe I have the best boots ever made. The name eludes me because they are from 1994-5. If you saw the movie Fargo, every one wore them. Eight winters in the alps, cutting wood, hiking, sledding.....well everything. They still wear like new and I've probably been out in -10º for 4+ hours at a time without a problem. Old style water proof using bees wax & hair dryer.

Grumulkin
January 31, 2014, 11:14 AM
When I hunt, I frequently use Crocs; camo of course. If it's muddy, I may wear an old pair of running shoes or possibly rubber boots.

ironworkerwill
January 31, 2014, 01:54 PM
I like the thorogoods too I'll third that! American heritage style work boot light, strong, and comfortable. I know it's a work boot,but, they do good job! I have a pair of Rockies that cost more than these do and I hate them.

I also had a pair of Thorogood Hellfire boots I had to have for work. One of the best boots I've ever worn. Fireproof, waterproof, zipped up, cool in summer, and warm in winter.

Tony k
February 3, 2014, 10:33 PM
I wear my LaSportiva Fuegos wildland firefighting boots as much as I can. Packing out 100lbs of meat in rough country isn't a whole lot different than humping a firepack, chainsaw, and two dolmars on a fire.

When it gets colder I switch to my insulated Allegiance footwear boots. You guys that like thorogoods might like them:
http://www.afboots.com/

My absolute favorite "boots" are a pair of minimalist running mocasins by Softstar: http://www.softstarshoes.com/adult-shoes/original-runamoc-suede-chocolate.html

The mocs are great for stealth and long range stalking without too much weight. Obviously, they get wet and are cold. Bonus: they look funny and your friends have something to laugh at. They stop laughing when they see the bear and deer I've been able to stalk and harvest in those goofy looking moccasins!

788Ham
February 4, 2014, 11:01 PM
Danner's with their rugged sole, I quit buying cheap imitations years ago. Unisulated for summer and fall wear, another pair of Danner's insulated for winter time outings.

WayBeau
February 5, 2014, 09:09 AM
Depends on what the hunting is, but . . . .

-Whitetails/turkeys in the fall/winter = Danner Canadians, leather, gore-tex, 600g Thinsulate

-Turkeys in the spring = 6" L.L. Bean Boots

-Ducks = Cabelas neoprene chest waders

jogar80
February 11, 2014, 05:51 PM
Chippewa snake boots, insulated and waterproof. I use them for all hunt seasons.

T.R.
February 14, 2014, 09:24 AM
For the late season I love my Rocky boots. They're just as warm as my former Sorels but a little lighter and less bulky, too.

TR

hiplains
February 20, 2014, 04:02 PM
I stumbled across these two seasons ago at Bass Pro. Wasn't looking but I had been thinking about finding an early season upland bird boot, one I could hike in all day long and survive the experience. Came across a pair of Under Armour lace ups.....didn't even know UA made boots at the time. They are the most comfortable boot I have ever owned, simply amazing. I have plowed through bogs in snow, ice, water about 4-5" inches deep, never a drop inside the boot although they are not advertised as waterproof. When it gets below 0degF, I stick a warmer on top of wool socks and keep right on going. Think I paid around $120 for them, on sale. Best unknown I ever fell into.

tarosean
February 20, 2014, 06:24 PM
Danners and I have a pair of Zamberlans that I haven't gotten to hunt in yet.

I can skimp on a lot of things except footwear...

ARW
February 20, 2014, 07:11 PM
Meindl 7in. non insulated and waterproof perfekt hiker from Cabelas, for early season and the 10in. perfekt, also from Cabelas, insulated and waterproof for late season.

These are pricy boots but are by far the most comfortable and best waterproof boots I have ever worn. The 7in. hikers I have are 10yrs. old and are still in good shape and very waterproof, and I have worn them a lot in those 10yrs., the 10in. I have are only 2yrs. old and are in very good shape also.

Alan

gamestalker
February 23, 2014, 05:58 PM
In the years prior to Gortex, the only option was a pair Sorel's, which are heavy and uncomfortable as it gets. Feet stayed dry, but at what cost. Now days I don't buy a pair of boots unless they have a complete inner booty of Gortex and Thinsulate.

I have an old pair of Danner's with the Gortex and Thinsulate, probably more than 10 yrs. old. That pair of boots has never leaked, and always keep my feet warm. I like them so much, that I had them resoled last year rather than wear my newer pairs. The thing about Gortex is even if water does get in over the top of the boot, they will dry out extremely quickly cause Gortex won't absorb moisture, it expels it.

Bottom line is this, when it concerns boots, you get what you pay for. Bargain brand boots will not keep your feet warm and dry, and you'll often have blisters after a a day of hunting to add to your misery.

GS

Legionnaire
February 24, 2014, 06:44 PM
Depends on season and weather conditions. I have at my disposal a pair of un-insulated rubber boots (don't remember the brand), a pair of lace-up leather boots with Gore-Tex liner and thinsulate insulation from Cabela's, and an oversized pair of heavy insulated pac boots inside of which I can wear an extra layer of wool socks and a pair of toe warmers and still have room to wiggle my toes. Think I got them from Cabela's, too. The middle pair gets the most wear.

trigga
March 9, 2014, 12:49 AM
boots are an essential part of your gear when you spend a lot of time outdoors. I've learned really quick to invest in some good ones. usually in the fall i wear a pair of wolverines. I like them light, comfortable and waterproof. I also like to wear them higher above the ankle and tuck in the bottom portion of my pants. for colder climates, i got me some heavy insulated construction boots. not the most comfortable but sure is warm. i also don't do as much walking in the winter so it's okay. i'd stay away from steel toes unless you plan on hunting off the road/trail.

Ole Humpback
March 9, 2014, 12:00 PM
I have a pair of Irish Setter Shadow Tracks. Works great for everything that I do, although they are a little warm for dove season.

gamestalker
March 12, 2014, 02:13 AM
I've owned probably 2 or 3 pairs of Woverine's, and although they were super comfortable, warm and 100% water proof, they just didn't last very long. I usually got one good hunting season out of them before they started falling apart. But this could be related to the type of terrain I hunt in, which is usually high mountain desert. Sharp rocks, nasty cacti ( cholla and barrel) and mesquite, which will easily defeat just about any boot.

OTOH, my good old Danner's have a steel shank in the sole that runs heel to toe, nothing ever gets through those soles. But at $200 a pair, they better last a long time, and protect my feet from the deadly elements of the desert!

But if money is not an issue, it's best to have several pairs, each having it's own purpose regarding terrain.

GS

kbbailey
March 13, 2014, 01:18 PM
Irish Setter waterproof 200gr lace-ups for early-season or upland.
Muck Arctic Shield for cold/snow/mud. The Mucks are good for stand hunting but pretty clunky for walking long distances.

jack_burton
March 14, 2014, 01:49 AM
Hoffman pack boots when it's cold and Hoffman loggers any other time. I can get away with the loggers in fairly cold weather with a good pair of wool sock

Martin12
March 19, 2014, 04:05 AM
LaCrosse AeroHead for me. Used to have an old Alphaburly pair but they were kinda tricky to get off, but this new boot is ideal. Great ankle and outsole support with it. Warm and snug when the weather is off. Top notch!

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