Old style ammunition for revolvers.


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Crawdad1
February 3, 2014, 03:06 PM
This would be a better way to load your revolver then loose powder and ball. Or would it? But how was it effectively carried out in the field? In the horse's saddlebags or your coats front pocket?

The item is sold but its educational.


http://www.michaelsimens.com/colt-antique-firearms-for-sale/colt-navy-skin-cartridges.html

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elhombreconnonombre
February 3, 2014, 09:09 PM
During the ACW both the union and CSA made self contained cartridges.

rcmodel
February 3, 2014, 09:14 PM
Yes, it is a better way.

Once the self-contained metallic cartridge was invented and perfected?
The muzzle loader rifle and cap & ball revolvers days were very number

rc

RPRNY
February 3, 2014, 09:58 PM
I use nothing but paper cartridges in 1858 Remington, Rogers&Spencer, and two percussion cap muzzle-loading rifles.

Big Al Mass
February 4, 2014, 12:29 AM
In the military, at least, the packets were carried in leather cartridge boxes, same as musket cartridges. The boxes for pistols were much smaller and went on the belt.

Crawdad1
February 4, 2014, 08:25 AM
For the military yes I can see those cartridge boxes but for a civilian how would he carry these? Would he have bought these at any dry good or harware store? And just in case would he have loose powder in a flask and ball/conical as a back up? :)

Malamute
February 4, 2014, 11:06 PM
I believe the manufactured paper cartridges were packed in 6 rd wood boxes. They were split down the middle with a paper wrapper and a string that tore the paper to allow the box to open. I believe they had troubles with keeping the paper cartridges intact in actual use. I think the general feeling back in the day was that they were not real practical for field use. I believe Keith mentioned them, and that they were fragile. May have been another writer though. I think you could consider them a convenience, but not a replacement for a flask and loose balls.

So long as you aren't squeamish about loading directly from a flask, that isn't really that bad of a way (time wise) to charge percussion pistols.

There are some pictures of the boxes they came in scattered through this page. The caps were packed along with the cartridges in most cases I believe.

https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&site=imghp&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1153&bih=687&q=original+paper+cartridges+for+colts+revolvers&oq=original+paper+cartridges+for+colts+revolvers&gs_l=img.12...1558.23067.0.26490.45.16.0.29.1.0.120.1580.8j8.16.0....0...1ac.1.34.img..36.9.904.LTZYwNzu2yw

goon
February 5, 2014, 09:57 PM
I've read on here that there were usually seven caps packed in a package of six revolver cartridges.

And I've seen powder horn flasks that were still in use as late as the Civil War. I've charged directly from the flask on the first loading with a revolver that couldn't have possibly contained any hot embers and it's a fairly fast way to load. From the reading I've done of primary sources from the Colonial era through the ACW, I get the impression that people were just more comfortable with taking a little more risk than we are now.
They crossed rivers on horseback and fought Plains tribes and stood fifty yards away from ranks of Confederate soldiers who were shooting at them with rifles for crying out loud.
I don't get the idea that charging a revolver from a flask would have been such an unacceptable idea for most people at that time.

Malamute
February 5, 2014, 10:22 PM
Charging from a flask was pretty common in the 1970's and 80's.

Metallic flasks were common in use during most of the percussion period, and I believe standard military issue for rifles and probably pistols. Horns were used in civilian sporting use, though metallic flasks were gaining over time I believe. Looking at period advertisements, flasks were available in many sizes and styles. I don't think paper cartridges completely displaced flasks and loose ammo until the metallic cartridge replaced percussion guns.

Crawdad1
February 6, 2014, 08:22 AM
I agree, Goon, sometimes the stories you read about the accidental discharging of muzzleloaders that led to a person’s death is downright mind numbing. Pulling loaded and primed shotguns out of wagons by the muzzle, they just didn’t think twice about what we would consider unsafe at any speed.

swathdiver
February 6, 2014, 10:34 PM
There's no comparison with loading a revolver from a flask and a rifle. It's completely safe to charge a revolver's cylinder directly from the flask.

Rules prohibiting such come from the ignorant.

It was common for paper cartridges to be packaged in paper covered wood boxes and by plain paper only.

Malamute
February 6, 2014, 11:37 PM
I agree, Goon, sometimes the stories you read about the accidental discharging of muzzleloaders that led to a person’s death is downright mind numbing. Pulling loaded and primed shotguns out of wagons by the muzzle, they just didn’t think twice about what we would consider unsafe at any speed.

Some were quite aware of the dangers. In the 1859 book The Prairie Traveler by Randolph Barnes Marcy, Captain, U.S.A. He goes into some dangers of handling arms, including pulling one towards you from a wagon etc. It's an interesting read for those interested in history and the West. His comments about gun handling and safety are in chapter V, the section about "Disposition of Fire-arms".

http://www.kancoll.org/books/marcy/mapref.htm

goon
February 7, 2014, 12:55 AM
Along with that, one of the James brothers was missing a few fingers from an accident with a revolver, wasn't he?

Didn't seem to hamper his career aspirations much though! lol

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