Is a Trigger Job on a 1911 Difficult ?


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chiltech500
February 11, 2014, 09:15 AM
Howdy,

I have the first Kunhausen 1911 shop manual with the 2nd on the way. The second manual has the trigger job details.

I have a Springfield Armory 9mm 1911 that needs work and I'm not in love with it anyway, so it's a good first victim to try my hand at modifying.

Any advice on special tools - and where to get them if needed? General thoughts and pointers would be appreciated.

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BBBBill
February 11, 2014, 10:27 AM
Study, study, study, and study some more. Not difficult when you understand what is going on and how all of the parts relate/interact with each other. But you must fully understand all of that to be certain of success. Did I say study? :)

Go to http://forums.1911forum.com/, go down to the gunsmithing subforum, and read all of the posts on trigger jobs. Pay particular attention to posts by log man and posts about the TR (True Radius) sear jig. I've used many jigs in the last 40 plus years and that one is now my favorite. I have lots more expensive jigs gathering dust now that I have the TR jig.

Always check your work by initially loading only one round at a time, then two, etc. Verify that the safeties work as designed. Doing a trigger job almost always means replacing or refitting the thumb safety.

If, after all of that, you are still not sure of yourself, it might be better to get a pro.

chiltech500
February 11, 2014, 11:26 AM
Thanks BBBB. I'm a member at 1911 forum just can't access the site from work.

It's sounding like a potential pro job considering the thumb safety refitting/replacement.

Drail
February 11, 2014, 12:00 PM
Trigger jobs are one of those things where one might take 20 minutes and the next one can take hours (or days). The work is not difficult with the proper tools but understanding exactly what needs to be done and where the problems are takes some experience. If you don't understand the theory of operation really well you can get into trouble pretty quickly. I have worked on several 1911s where the pin holes for the sear and hammer were so out of spec and not parallel to each other that you couldn't get a good trigger without having to stone the hammer or sear at an angle or find a sear that is long enough to fit. With an quality frame though it's not really difficult at all. A good place to start is by reading Jerry Kuhnhusen's book - The 1911 - A shop manual (Vol 1) But don't start stoning any parts until you have read it several times and really understand how the system works. And then be prepared to buy some tooling and stones and jigs.

chiltech500
February 11, 2014, 12:16 PM
Thanks Drail. I bought the Kunhausens' to understand the working and internals not necessarily to do mods or my own trigger job. That was an afterthought, as my Springer trigger is a miserable 6 lb and I'm trying Bullseye with it rather unsuccessfully. On the other hand my Dan Wesson Valor stock is quite fine.

I took a look at the True Radius sear and jig on Brownells and see that it's an investment in tools that I'm not sure I want to make. If I were a 30 - 40 year old I wouldn't hesitate.

I have a garage full of motorcycles and tools I have to dispose of because I had an accident in 2012 that has left me partially handicapped and I can't work on bikes anymore. I don't want to go there with guns, though I shoot a lot now including the start on Bullseye.

Old Fuff
February 11, 2014, 12:31 PM
Safe trigger pull adjustment requires investment in jigs, fixtures and more. It also requires knowledge and experience that won't be gained by doing "a job."

Unless you are going to do a lot of work (meaning to become a gunsmithing specialist) the investment in getting set up isn't worth it.

You'd be much wiser to pick a gunsmith with a reputation and send them the gun.

Several years ago we had an extensive, well illustrated thread on 1911 trigger adjustment techniques. Use this forumís search feature and see if you can find it.

chiltech500
February 11, 2014, 12:54 PM
I will take good advice to have a pro do it. You never know about something till you look at it and ask, not everything is difficult or complicated.

I watched a buddy smooth out a Beretta 92 trigger by polishing some surfaces and ease the pull by nipping off a bit of spring. That I could do and it worked well.

Red Cent
February 11, 2014, 03:01 PM
http://item.brownells.com/groups/power-custom-series-i-stoning-fixture/series-i-stoning-fixture-fixture-complete-model-1022-fits-ruger-1022.htm

Otherwise, hit and miss. Or one like it.

Jim K
February 11, 2014, 03:05 PM
"Is a Trigger Job on a 1911 Difficult ?"

Doing a trigger job on a 1911 is not difficult. Doing it right is difficult.

Jim

pretzelxx
February 11, 2014, 03:14 PM
Watch a lot of YouTube videos if you don't have contact with a real pistolsmith. Find out the workings, take her apart and go slow. Patience is something you need a LOT of when doing stuff like that. that being said, have fun with it and learn as much as you can

chiltech500
February 11, 2014, 05:26 PM
Yes pretzelxx, patience is a must. I have a lot of patience for mechanical things and computers - significantly less for people LOL. I am also dogged I will keep working at it till it works out.

Doing a trigger job on a 1911 is not difficult. Doing it right is difficult.

Priceless !!!

Jolly Rogers
February 12, 2014, 06:48 PM
If someone doesn't even know if a job is difficult how will they winnow out the outright bad information on utube??

They are out there...a video called "trigger job by Terry G" showed a hack doing a trigger job that had to be redone soon after and has been quoted on gun forums as a way to do the work...:banghead:
Widely debunked on dedicated 1911 forums.
Joe

1911 guy
February 13, 2014, 12:46 AM
Quotes from Old Fuff and Jim K:

Safe trigger pull adjustment requires investment in jigs, fixtures and more. It also requires knowledge and experience that won't be gained by doing "a job."

Unless you are going to do a lot of work (meaning to become a gunsmithing specialist) the investment in getting set up isn't worth it.

You'd be much wiser to pick a gunsmith with a reputation and send them the gun.

Doing a trigger job on a 1911 is not difficult. Doing it right is difficult.

Drail
February 13, 2014, 09:43 AM
NO!!! DON"T watch any videos on Youtube regarding gun work. There are so many hacks on there it's not even funny. Anyone can post crap on Youtube. And they are.

log man
February 13, 2014, 12:25 PM
I agree the videos do not provide what is needed. Much has been written about this. First and foremost study and research the sear and hammer geometry. The sear primary is not meant to be matched in plane to the hammer hook face. The correct sear face is always as to the print. Or the TR (true radius) concept is in play. The TR jig it is really the easiest to do, and the results are both safe, and satisfying.

LOG

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