Wolf ammo.


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Rikki
April 1, 2004, 12:43 AM
has anyone used the wolf copper jackted 45acp ammo. is this the stuff that has that lacquered stuff or is that the steel cased. i am also searching the internet for cheap ammo prices so if you could be so kind as pointing me to some good sites i would be greatfull

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JA
April 1, 2004, 08:49 AM
http://wolfammo.com/
All Wolf ammo has steel caes. I have used Wolf 223,5.45x39mm,
7.62x39mm,380,9mm,and 45. All has worked fine for me.
The best deal on ammo is buying by the case at a gunshow. You have to pay state sales tax but not shipping. Buying from a mail order/internet place that is in the next state to keep shipping costs down and avoid state sales tax if there are no gun shows in your area.
What state are you living in so I can post a link to a ammo seller that is close to you?

kokapelli
April 1, 2004, 09:06 AM
Not all Wolf ammo is steele cased!

http://www.wtv-zone.com/jnib/images/ktog/wolf_380.jpg

rbernie
April 1, 2004, 09:07 AM
It stinks, it's *really* dirty, and I've had the occasional feed issues due to the steel cases not wanting to 'slide' on the mag lips as readily as brass.

For range practice, I now shoot WWB (dirty, but othewise seems OK) in 45ACP and Blazer in 9mm.

MaterDei
April 1, 2004, 09:22 AM
"BIMETAL CASE"

Gee, do they mean brass (copper and zinc) or something else?

Just yesterday I received 1000 rounds of Sellier & Bellot .45ACP from Natchez Shooter's Supply ( www.natchezss.com ). With shipping (no tax) I paid about what buying it at the gun show locally would cost. I guess since I didn't have to lug it to my car and from my car to my house I came out on the plus side. When I got home from work last night, my wife said that I received a package in the mail. I asked here where it was. She said it was next to the front door and that she couldn't pick it up. :)

The folks at Natchez also send a catalog with the ammo. They are evil! :evil:

One caveat: Some (all?) online dealers require an adult (aged 21 or older) be home to sign for the ammo when it is delivered. My wife doesn't work outside the house so this is really not a big deal for us. However...

Hemicuda
April 1, 2004, 09:27 AM
Bi-metal... lemme see...

zinc+steel

chrome-vanadium+steel

copper wash+steel...

Bi-metal could be ANYTHING... try a magnet on those "bi metal" cases, and we'll see if there's any steel in them!

MaterDei
April 1, 2004, 09:32 AM
Unless you use a brass magnet in which case you won't know whether there is steel or not. :eek:

kokapelli
April 1, 2004, 09:34 AM
Hermicuda said "try a magnet on those "bi metal" cases, and we'll see if there's any steel in them"

I don't have any of the Wolf around to try. I had so many FTF and FTE problems
:banghead: with it in my P-3AT and Bersa Thunder that I gave what I had left away!

Hemicuda
April 1, 2004, 09:39 AM
I use ALOT of WOLF ammo in my SKS...

you won't catch ANY of it in my other fine firearms... the SKS and AK guns and derivatives were designed to use steel-cased ammo... My Smittys, DanWessons, Rugers, Winchesters, Remingtons, Berettas et all are TOO good a guns to be treated that way!

JA
April 1, 2004, 09:49 AM
Yes,all Wolf ammo has steel cases

Wolf ammo marked "bimetal cases" on the box uses the same steel cases as the ammo marked "steel cases" on the box. The difference is the coating on the steel cases. Laquer or polymer is used on the "steel cases" ammo and copper is used on the "bimetal cases" ammo.

kokapelli
April 1, 2004, 09:53 AM
You guys are probably right about the steel content.

Whatever it's made of, my 380s sure don't like it!

Rikki
April 1, 2004, 07:27 PM
I'm about 20 miles south of Kansas city Missouri.

blue86buick
April 1, 2004, 07:39 PM
Yup, sure do! I'm a poo....err, frugal....youngin, and therefor like to get the most bang for my buck. That, and I like to make my .45 "bang" a lot, so the more rounds I get for my money, the better! That said, it could almost be said that I ONLY shoot the .45ACP Wolf through my Kimber BP Ten II. I haven't yet reached the 500 round point in that gun, but have got to be getting close. Everything that I've shot except 1 box of CCI Blazer, and half a box of Federal AE, has been Wolf. So far, I haven't had any problems with it that I can remember. I'm happy with Wolf, happy with the price, and will continue to buy and shoot it through my .45. Heck, if I decide to carry ball, I might even carry Wolf! :what:

clubsoda22
April 1, 2004, 08:09 PM
bimetal is copper washed steel.

wally
April 1, 2004, 08:22 PM
Yup, steel cases in .380 is usually extraction failure city for me. Not confined to Wolf, I think I've tried it all (steel cased .380) in several guns without any success unless you call practicing clearing jams worthwhile.


Have little trouble with their other calibers in very many different guns. The price is right, so a few duds or hard primers don't bother me.

--wally.

BluesBear
April 2, 2004, 07:05 AM
My old Colt Commander was a bit finicky regarding Wolf ammo.

The MkIV Series 80 Government Enhanced that is my primary weapon now gobbles them up like candy. The only problem I had was at first that 5 or 6 per box had to be struck twice to fire. Turns out that was a problem with the Wilson mainspring I had put in it. Since I returned to the original Colt mainspring i've fired 600 rounds without any bobbles of any kind. I was having FTFire with other brands as well.

Yes it stinks. It reminds me of the aroma of 1960s era Federal .22 rimfire.
I don't notice it as being any harder to clean that Winchester White Box.

At $6.50 -$7.00 per box it's well worth it to me.

I use it, and aluminum Blazer, outdoors for plinking and walk & draw exercises so I don't have to worry about combing through the gravel looking for the cases.

bountyhunter
April 2, 2004, 01:25 PM
i am also searching the internet for cheap ammo prices so if you could be so kind as pointing me to some good sites i would be greatfull For new ammo:

Proload
Natchez Shooters Supply

For reloads:

Miwall is pretty good, really cheap

bountyhunter
April 2, 2004, 01:28 PM
That said, it could almost be said that I ONLY shoot the .45ACP Wolf through my Kimber BP Ten II. 1911 extractors are (by design) made from soft springy steel so they can flex. Soft steel extractor hook pulling on steel case rim = rapid wear on the tip. Extractors only cost about $30 so maybe it's a wash on the dollars, but they have to be fitted and tuned to work right.

Preacherman
April 2, 2004, 01:52 PM
I'd recommend that you don't use Wolf ammo in any guns except those designed for it - i.e. Communist-bloc guns like the SKS, AK-47, etc. I use it for those guns, and they eat it up and come back for more. However, I won't use it in my other guns - too many reports of problems from reputable gunsmiths. Also, you'll find that CCI Blazer is about the same cost (sometimes cheaper), and doesn't cause anything like the same problems.

BluesBear
April 2, 2004, 06:15 PM
1911 extractors are (by design) made from soft springy steel so they can flex.
That's the major problem with modern 1911 pattern pistols. The extractors are NOT made of spring steel any more. Which is why they have to be tuned so often.

A real spring steel extractor will have a harder surface. Between the garder surface and ability to flex properly will actually last longer even using steel casings than a regular factory stock extractor.

Don't forget Evansville Chrysler turned out millions of steel cased .45 ball ammunition during WWII. Wolf cases are made from even softer steel.

cerberus
April 3, 2004, 12:24 PM
Buy CCI Blazer Alum. or their new brass case Ammo. stay away from steel anything type cases. Just MHO.

seeker_two
April 3, 2004, 04:08 PM
Aside from being the dirtiest ammo I've ever used (like shooting black powder autopistol loads :barf: ), I haven't seen much problem w/ Wolf Ammo.

But when, in my area, I can get WWB or S&B (much better ammo, IMHO) for less than a quarter per box more, I'll stick w/ the brass. :cool:

liliysdad
April 3, 2004, 07:57 PM
I like the Wolf MUCH, MUCH better than the Wichester White Box stuff, which I fond to be filthy, and terribly innacurate. I liek the Wolf, and it has proven to be 100% reliable in every gun Ive tried in. I have seen absolutely no downside to using it, and buy it exclusivley as range and plinking ammo.

The rapid extractor wear is bunk, as the steel used in the Wolf, or any steel cased ammo, is as soft, or softer, than brass used in similar instances.

IMO, buys some, try it in your gun. Chances are, it will work, and be accurate. If not, dont use it. As for me, I love it.

bountyhunter
April 5, 2004, 12:37 PM
That's the major problem with modern 1911 pattern pistols. The extractors are NOT made of spring steel any more. Which is why they have to be tuned so often.

A real spring steel extractor will have a harder surface. Between the garder surface and ability to flex properly will actually last longer even using steel casings than a regular factory stock extractor.
. In reality, "spring steel" is a term with no metallurgical meaning, just one use by convention. Any steel's hardness and strength will be a direct result of it's formula and hardening steps (if used). I have spent an absurd amount of time filing and contouring 1911 extractors, and I have yet to meet one that was anything but SOFT. I have seen numerous pistures of tips "rounded" over at the end from wear leading to FTE problems. To my knowledge, no 1911 extractor on this planet has ever been "surface" or "case" hardened as such a process which is used on triggers, hammers, and sears.

The new extractors are mostly MIM, so there is a final "firing" step in the process where the metal particles are fused into a single piece, but this is a process like sintering, it is not a hardening step per se (although, the piece does get harder and stronger as a result of it). The hardness of the piece after this step is (as before) directly related to the steel formula. MIM parts which DO require surface hardening (like SW triggers and hammers), get an additional step to achieve this and leave them that ugly mottled blue-grey color.

I stand by my statement that using steel case ammo will wear an extractor tip, and in the case of harder extractors, they can just shear the tip off.

bountyhunter
April 5, 2004, 12:49 PM
Yup, steel cases in .380 is usually extraction failure city for me. Not confined to Wolf, I think I've tried it all (steel cased .380) in several guns without any success unless you call practicing clearing jams worthwhile. That's a relatively common problem (I read about it in a gunsmith journal some time back), and it's likely due to a throat that is tight to spec (as opposed to sloppy loose). Steel and brass expand differently when the round fires and exert different amonts of force on the throat. Brass tends to expand and contract faster, and the "unlock cycle" of the guns are designed around that time coefficient. Some guns simply refuse to cucle steel because the round "hangs on" too long in the throat and the extractor slips past the rim.

BluesBear
April 5, 2004, 07:23 PM
The new extractors are mostly MIM...

While there are some MIM extractors, the word most, meaning the majority of the, doesn't apply.

You'll find that most companies are still using solid metals in their extractors.

bountyhunter
April 5, 2004, 07:28 PM
Not true of the mass production 1911 makers as well as beretta and some others. Even Kimbers guns are loaded with MIM parts, including the extractors. So, the word "most" definitely does apply to 1911 MIM extractors which is what my post referred to. Very few 1911's come standard with forged extractors.

blue86buick
April 6, 2004, 01:45 AM
It may wear out quicker, but I'll just see how long that actually takes me. With the quantity of shooting I do, I prefer to save the $2.00/box, but also it should take me a while to notice wear on the extractor.

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