S&W K-Frame Trigger Replacement


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BSA1
February 14, 2014, 07:58 PM
A while back I brought a well used Model 10-6 police trade in. Alas it developed serious problems with the action so I sent it back to the factory for repair. The good news is they repaired the gun and the action is like brand new out of the box. The bad news is the smooth action from 30 years of use is gone. It appears S&W installed a new hammer and trigger as part of the repair.

Since the action is stiff and heavy I would like to replace the skinny trigger with a slightly wider smooth one. Which leads me to two questions;

Where can I find a new smooth combat trigger?

How much fitting is required for the new trigger? There aren't any "gunsmiths" on my area I know well enough to trust with my gun. Is there a YouTube video that shows where it needs to be fitted?

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Old Fuff
February 14, 2014, 08:58 PM
Except for serrations vs. smooth, and the width of the fingerpiece, S&W uses the same trigger(s) in K, L and N frame revolvers. The hammers are different, and I am a bit confused because current hammers don't have the hammer nose (firing pin) mounted in the hammer - as would be expected in a model 10-6 - but in the frame.

Generally hammers and triggers were not fitted as such, although sometimes one or the other might be exchanged for a different one during the final assembly process. What is fitted is the little spring-loaded lever in the hammer face, called a "sear."

You may well find that if you dry fire the revolver (while using snap-caps) about 1000 times. it will burnish the new parts at various contact points and restore the former smoothness. I would do this before spending additional money on a new trigger. That said, two sources that might have a trigger are:

www.brownells.com

www.gunpartscorp.com

If you describe it as a "smooth face combat trigger" the should know what you want, as other S&W triggers are serrated.

BSA1
February 14, 2014, 10:07 PM
If I had known S&W was going to replace the trigger when I sent it back for repair I would have requested the smooth combat trigger.

So if I am understanding you right the new trigger is a drop in part.

I remember reading a interview some years ago in with a S&W executive who was asked what was the best way to smooth the action on their revolvers. He replied "Shoot....a lot" which I plan on doing.

rcmodel
February 14, 2014, 10:22 PM
So if I am understanding you right the new trigger is a drop in part.The trigger might be drop-in.

Or not!

Was I you, I'd take to advice of the S&W guy.
That's the way the first trigger you had got that smooth.

rc

winchester1886
February 14, 2014, 11:48 PM
Your best bet is to find a qualified gunsmith and have him work on the trigger. I have seen several shade tree gunsmiths screw up a good pistol.a good trigger job is not for beginners.

Old Fuff
February 15, 2014, 12:15 PM
So if I am understanding you right the new trigger is a drop in part.


At the time the model 10-6 was made a final assembler would drop in a hammer and trigger and see if they interfaced, as they should. If not, one or the other would be changed out and replaced with a different one. Most of the time this wasn't necessary. They didn't fit these two parts by filing or grinding except in places where they're was no contact between them or other places because they were case hardened, and going too deep could ultimately cause excessive wear - depending on the circumstances.

S&W went so far as to point out this high degree of interchangeability in their advertising, pointing out that Colt's hand fitted parts were far more likely to not interchange between guns.

It has been my experience that S&W hammers and triggers will interchange, but the (previously mentioned) sear must be fitted to match up with a particular trigger, although I have had instances where a fitted sear did work fine with a different trigger.

Regarding your situation. I think that itís likely (but not a 100% sure thing) that another trigger would drop in, but it would still require that an experienced Ďsmith fit the sear.

If the revolver in question was mine, I would take into consideration that a different trigger would probably cost $50.00 or more, and thatís not counting any associated labor. Therefore I would try some dry-firing to burnish those places on the hammer and trigger that come in contact under pressure, and see if the action didnít return to itís former smoothness. If so, and I was satisfied Iíd grind the serrations on the finger piece off, round the face, and polish it smooth. The result would represent at least 90% of what you want.

As an aside, prior to the late 1930ís .38 Military & Police revolvers came with a standard width, smooth face trigger. I have on occasion put one of these in a much later model 10 with no negative issues, but I wouldnít say that this could be done on a drop-in basis.

BSA1
February 15, 2014, 08:19 PM
Old Fuff,

Since there are not any local "gunsmiths" I know well enough to trust I think I will follow your suggestion and grind the serrations off the trigger. OMG he's got the Dremel tool out!!!

If I don't like the results I can always get a smooth combat trigger.

Thanks to all that replied.

Old Fuff
February 15, 2014, 08:30 PM
You can use a Dremel.... :uhoh:

Or a piece of wood dowel with emery cloth wrapped around it. This is slower, but more precise and less chance of a mistake. Be sure that in the process you don't leave a sharp edge at the front/bottom of the finger piece.

Use the Dremel as a last step to do the final polish.

BSA1
February 16, 2014, 09:58 PM
Thanks,

I have removed serrations off of triggers in the past so I comfortable with doing so. That I also how I know I prefer the medium width smooth combat trigger (I carried a Model13 so equipped many years ago).

On the other hand I might just decide I like the narrow smooth trigger.

gamestalker
February 18, 2014, 01:37 AM
I can't recall by memory, but I do believe installation of a new trigger requires the use of a special tool called a spring block. This is a necessary for installing and loading the timing hand spring that is attached to the trigger on my K's.

If you decide to go forward with replacement, unless your experienced with this assembly, don't attempt it on your own, or without the assistance of a knowledgeable gun smith. I had more than one gun smith that didn't know how to replace one, or that a spring block is necessary.

GS

Old Fuff
February 18, 2014, 11:45 AM
I do believe installation of a new trigger requires the use of a special tool called a spring block.

The hand is tensioned in the trigger by a small mousetrap style spring, but a special tool isn't required. A small blade-style screwdriver will work fine. You do have to know how to do it however.

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