Is it worth buying something in .357 SIG?


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greenr18
March 7, 2014, 05:38 PM
I have never seen .357 SIG in any gun store as far as the ammo except the one I work, and even then its been the same few boxes for a couple years with no requests for anything in it and noone buying a box sooo my question I guess is, is this a "dead" caliber like something that came and went like all those old wildcat calibers, is it just down to a small dedicated group of people who like it? If it really does pack as much punch as a .357 Magnum I'd love to get something compact in it for carry but not if its "unsupported" and going to be something thats not readily available, would have to be reloaded, and thus probably hard to find parts for a gun in the future chambered in it... any thoughts? I've heard some people say itd be better to get something in 10mm Auto instead?

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Mastrogiacomo
March 7, 2014, 06:38 PM
I hope it's not the case because I'm planning on getting a Sig 229 in .357 caliber for my future purchase.

Laura

rockhopper46038
March 7, 2014, 06:46 PM
Heck yeah it's worth it, if you want it! :)

However, from a purely pragmatic position I would say that I see little to recommend it over the 10mm. It's more scarce, harder to reload, and doesn't offer any advantage in either cartridge count (since it uses the same diameter brass prior to the bottleneck) or energy.

The 9x23 Win however - now there's a cartridge worth talking about! :)

ETA: Lest I sell the .357SIG short, it has an OAL that fits in some of the smaller frame handguns that allow use of the longer .45ACP, etc. So if you have smallish hands, it may be just the ticket.

greenr18
March 7, 2014, 06:58 PM
thats actually part of the reason why i want it, im just afraid that in the future itll be hard to find ammo for it or gun parts for pistols chambered in it

rockhopper46038
March 7, 2014, 07:18 PM
I wouldn't worry about parts in the future; I think that all the pistols chambered for .357SIG use common parts from the .40S&W platform. I wouldn't swear to it, but it wouldn't surprise me one bit to find that you could swap a .40S&W barrel in for your .357SIG barrel and go shoot. It's possible that even the magazines are the same, just with different markings (perhaps different magazine followers). Even getting a new barrel if that were to become necessary might be possible by rechambering a 9mm barrel, especially if it were a slightly overbored example.

jmr40
March 7, 2014, 07:19 PM
357 Sig just barely beats 9mm +p. In fact many loads overlap hotter 9mm performance. Many of the better 9mm loads beat 357 mag with 124/125 gr bullets from shorter barreled revolvers if that is your goal.

I cannot see giving up the mag capacity for virtually no gain in performance. And pay more for ammo while doing it. If you can find any ammo.

JRS950
March 7, 2014, 08:02 PM
S & W does not list any .357 Sig in M&P line any longer. I was considering that caliber for my next purchase. But….......

Onward Allusion
March 7, 2014, 08:20 PM
I really like the Sig 357 cartridge. I packs more energy than a 9, 40, & even 45 if you believe the numbers. It's definitely better at penetrating hard barricades. BUT even exotic Sig 357 rounds don't pack as much energy as some 357 mag SD rounds. One major advantage of the cartridge is its bottleneck case. Pretty much guarantees proper feeding.

Do some research on your own. Folks here are biased, including me. Depending on the 40S&W pistol you have, you could just swap barrels (if available) and start shooting 357 Sig or vice versa. Lot's of people do just that. Get a G31 and practice with a drop in 40 barrel.

...and no, it isn't a dying cartridge by a long shot.

Nom de Forum
March 7, 2014, 09:13 PM
IMO the .357Sig gives you all the disadvantages of the .40S&W and none of the advantages. Why not just buy a .40S&W and if you decide you want to shoot fast .355 diameter bullets get a conversion barrel for cheap 9mmPara. If you decide you need to shoot slightly faster .355 diameter bullets you can get a conversion barrel for more expensive .357Sig.

CDW4ME
March 7, 2014, 09:24 PM
Do not buy a 357 Sig and do not shop online for ammo. :rolleyes:
You should stick with 9mm, 40, 45 and limit yourself to the ammo you can find from driving all over town. :rolleyes:

I like the 357 Sig, but not everyone is willing to shop online for ammo (so inconvenient :rolleyes:) or pay a little more for a little more performance.
Why try to convince them otherwise? ;)

Here is chrono data from my pistols (not a program), 5 shot average:

Glock 32:
Winchester Ranger T 125 gr. @ 1,334 fps / 494# KE / PF 167
Speer Gold Dot 125 gr. @ 1,344 fps / 501# KE / PF 168
Federal HST 125 gr. @ 1,358 fps / 512# KE / PF 170

Glock 23:
Federal Hydra-Shok 180 gr. @ 969 fps / 375# KE / PF 174
Remington Golden Saber 165 gr. @ 1,048 fps / 402# KE / PF 173
Winchester Ranger T 165 @ 1,146 fps / 481# KE / PF 189

Glock 33:
Winchester Ranger T 125 gr. @ 1,280 fps / 455# KE / PF 160
Speer Gold Dot 125 gr. @ 1,284 fps / 458# KE / PF 161
Federal HST 125 gr. @ 1,315 fps / 480# KE / PF 164

Glock 27:
Federal Hydra-Shok 180 gr. @ 940 fps / 353# KE / PF 169
Remington Golden Saber 165 gr. @ 1,028 fps / 387# KE / PF 170
Winchester Ranger T 165 @ 1,113 fps / 454# KE / PF 184

My bad, I posted data using ammo that may not be available at the local Mart; but, I don't limit myself that way. ;) :)
http://www.gunbot.net/ammo/pistol/357sig/
http://ammoseek.com/ammo/357sig

zaphar
March 7, 2014, 09:27 PM
357 Sig just barely beats 9mm +p. In fact many loads overlap hotter 9mm performance. Many of the better 9mm loads beat 357 mag with 124/125 gr bullets from shorter barreled revolvers if that is your goal.

I cannot see giving up the mag capacity for virtually no gain in performance. And pay more for ammo while doing it. If you can find any ammo.

Are you sure about that?
9mm +P generally is 115gr@1235fps and 124gr@1180fps out of a 4" barrel at 38500PSI.
38 Super is 115gr@1280fps and 125gr@1230fps out of a 5" barrel at 36500PSI.
357SIG is 115gr@1550(?) and 125gr@1350fps out of a 4"(?) barrel at 40000PSI.

At least according to: http://www.saami.org/specifications_and_information/publications/download/205.pdf and http://www.saami.org/specifications_and_information/specifications/Velocity_Pressure_CfPR.pdf

These are also just what SAAMI states. If you look at what competitive IPSC shooters are doing for Major power factor in Open pistols, they're pushing 9x19mm pressure to very high levels but they're also using specialized pistols that can take the pressure, probably something your run-of-the-mill plastic framed 9x19mm pistol wont do well (they do it because the brass is cheap and many people just throw it away).

If you really want to compare the fast 9's, you have to take into consideration bullet weight, barrel length (base of chamber to muzzle end), internal pressure, rifling type, and chamber dimensions (tight, loose, ramped barrel?). Any comparison that doesn't involve all three of these variables is flawed because it will throw off the results if not equal. The ballistics by the inch website does a pretty good job at comparing cartridges, but even their tests can be off if a cartridge is downloaded by producers due to stupid design features like unsupported chambers (1911, old Glock 40S&W).

9x19mm has the least amount of case capacity when comparing it to other (non-blowback 9mm calibers) and will lose out due to pressure when all other variables are equal. It's the least expensive center-fire pistol caliber, that's for sure, but it's the short player at a basketball game when you're talking velocity/pressure ;)

357 SIG is good if you want a small frame pistol and don't mind decreased capacity. Reloading for it is more challenging from what I understand but there is once-fired brass available on the secondary market for it.

ritepath
March 7, 2014, 10:29 PM
For the last few weeks it's been on the shelf at our local walmart. First time in at least a year I've seen it.

tomrkba
March 7, 2014, 10:34 PM
The SIG P229 in 357 SIG was an absolute tack driver. The weight of the gun assisted greatly with the recoil. Do it!

horsemen61
March 7, 2014, 10:57 PM
I say get it but I already own. 10mm :D

AK103K
March 7, 2014, 11:20 PM
I was quite enamored with the 357SIG for a number of years, and had a half dozen or so guns in the caliber.

Once I came to realize it really didnt do anything better than 9mm +P+, and the price of ammo (and components) for some reason all of a sudden took off, I opted to get out of them and went back to 9mm. I havent regretted the decision.

357SIG is an interesting round, but its really just another round that performs basically the same as the others.

Im not sure if its a fluke, or Natchez is just crazy, but I got a mailer from them the other day, and they were getting $45 a box of 50 for Speer Lawman! 20 round boxes of Federal Hydra Shoks were $67.50!!!:eek:

.45 acp always used to be the top dollar stuff. Looks like thats changed.

BigBore44
March 8, 2014, 12:05 AM
The .357 Sig was interesting to me for about 10 minutes. Then I looked at the price of the ammo compared to the realistic possibilities of actually needing the extra ~150 fps. Oh, and .357 Sig practice ammo compared to 9mm? The .357 Sig died a quick death for me that day.

gym
March 8, 2014, 12:12 AM
I wouldn't get it. The 9 will be easier to get ammo for.

Wreck-n-Crew
March 8, 2014, 12:16 AM
I reload so I passed on the idea of fooling with rifle loading processes in pistol calibers. But if you like a .357 Magnum (and I do ) get the barrels ( if you can). You can shoot 40 and carry .357 sig.

zaphar
March 8, 2014, 12:27 AM
I don't personally use the 357 SIG, however, it's an option. 38 Super has the advantages of both but isn't suited for shooters that want to go to Walmart to pickup ammo (if it's there?). Every independently owned gunstore I've gone to has had it and 357SIG too. Reloading is where it's at, components from .380, 9x19, .357 SIG, and .357 MAG can be used.

AK103K
March 8, 2014, 03:28 AM
Ive reloaded quite a bit of 357SIG, and its really not a big deal, one extra step if you use a .40S&W carbide sizer.

Use a powder like AA #9, with a load that is basically a compressed load, and the bullet setback issue isnt an issue.

Bullets are somewhat caliber specific though, and you are limited in what you can use. The 125 grain 357SIG bullets are more along the lines of 147 grain 9mm bullets profile wise, and that was the only 9mm bullet I had any luck with in the 357SIG. Even then, I didnt find them to shoot very well. 357SIG bullets were also usually more expensive, and often harder to find, even on line.

mongoslow
March 8, 2014, 09:37 PM
I checked with my LGS this morning,I can pick up a .357 sig barrel for a G32 for $145 and run it in my G23 without changing anything, I can even use my .40 mags. I'm going to do this just for the heck of it, if i like it i will buy some dedicated .357 mags with the correct follower to use , if not i will chunk it in my glock box and call it a learning experince :D

CZguy
March 8, 2014, 09:53 PM
The magazines are interchangeable between .357 Sig and .40 S&W they use the same follower, they are just marked one or the other.

mongoslow
March 8, 2014, 10:09 PM
well thats good news on the followers , I may have to buy some diffrent colored mag floor plates for my extra mags though , i have a G19 and the G23 and if I add the .357 barrel i will dedicate a couple mags to the caliber(I'm just anal that way) then i can seperate caliber at a glance by color :)

tommy.duncan
March 8, 2014, 10:19 PM
I have a P226 in 357sig. It is accurate and fun to shoot. I like the round, it's a Lil expensive but an overall good round.
You can pick up a conversion barrel if you have a pistol in 40s&w. The mags are interchangeable.

Jenrick
March 8, 2014, 11:26 PM
.357 sig is basically a 9mm +P+ driven at stupid high velocity. You retain the smaller grip size of the 9mm/.40 and don't step up into 10mm or .45 ACP grip size. I personally find that it has less recoil then a .40 S&W though it is louder and has more muzzle flash. In general is there a "need" for it compared to 9mm? Not really, but to be honest driving a quality 9mm bullet like a Gold Dot or Ranger XT 300-400 FPS faster is not a bad thing. If you can live with the decreased capacity I do think there is some additional terminal ballistic benefit to be had.

-Jenrick

hentown
March 9, 2014, 08:58 AM
These are also just what SAAMI states. If you look at what competitive IPSC shooters are doing for Major power factor in Open pistols, they're pushing 9x19mm pressure to very high levels but they're also using specialized pistols that can take the pressure, probably something your run-of-the-mill plastic framed 9x19mm pistol wont do well (they do it because the brass is cheap and many people just throw it away).


I don't/won't ever load .357 Sig and won't own either a .40 S&W or .357 Sig handgun. However, the above quote is fraught with fallacious information.

The frame of a pistol has nothing to do with that pistol's ability to "handle pressure." A Glock 9mm is designed to shoot +p 9mm forever, with no pressure-related failures. I currently have my daily carry G26 loaded with +p+ Ranger Talon 127gr ammo. I have no fear that my G26 will turn into a grenade when fired. ;)

I wouldn't put a lot of stock in kinetic energy @ the muzzle figures, as those figures are largely irrelevant for s.d. purposes...well, that is, except you to get to enjoy more recoil, muzzle flip and muzzle blast. ;)

abq87120
March 11, 2014, 09:21 AM
My EDC is a Glock G23, a .40 S&W. I carry it stock. But for IDPA and USPSA shoots, I bought LWD barrels in 40-9mm conversion and 357 Sig for about $110 each with shipping. Both barrels drop in with no other mods. The 40-9mm conversion does require 9mm mags. The 357 Sigs are essentially a .40 case necked down to 9mm bullet . So, the 40 mags work reliably with 357 Sig bullets. The only difference between a stock Glock 40 and a stock Glock 357 is the barrel and the stamps on the slide.

I also reload all of my calibers. The 357 Sig reloading is more art than science. I use a compressed load of 13g AA #9, Starline cases and Precision Delta 124g JHP's work just fine (conical nose). And a Lee FCD die to finish them off. My loading manual claims 1400 fps, major power factor. All this hoo-ha is because the 357 Sig is prone to set back when it hits the feed ramp. Even factory loads occasionally have this problem. Makes an interesting Kablooie. AA #9 burns so slow it's hard to damage a gun with it.

Most other gun manufacturers can be converted between 40 and 357. But Glock parts are usually much less expensive that other brands by far. I converted my Glock (briefly) to a NY1 trigger. $15 + tax out the door. Have you ever heard of a trigger conversion for less than $200 on a name-brand 1911? What a rip off.

The 357 Sig is a fun round to shoot. Mine has a reduced muzzle flip, more if a pushy recoil than a flippy one. Wear good hearing protection. It can be loud.

Teachu2
March 11, 2014, 11:08 PM
My EDC is a Glock G23, a .40 S&W. I carry it stock. But for IDPA and USPSA shoots, I bought LWD barrels in 40-9mm conversion and 357 Sig for about $110 each with shipping. Both barrels drop in with no other mods. The 40-9mm conversion does require 9mm mags.



Odd - I have a pair of Gen3 G23s and use a LDW 40-9 conversion barrel with them. Both guns function perfectly using the .40 mags with the 9mm conversion - they just hold a couple extra 9mm cartridges (12 instead of 10 - I'm in CA).

PabloJ
March 12, 2014, 12:05 AM
No, I see no benefit of owning anything in this caliber and if you don't like what you get it will be next to impossible to sell it at favorable price.

abq87120
March 12, 2014, 09:01 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by abq87120 View Post
My EDC is a Glock G23, a .40 S&W. I carry it stock. But for IDPA and USPSA shoots, I bought LWD barrels in 40-9mm conversion and 357 Sig for about $110 each with shipping. Both barrels drop in with no other mods. The 40-9mm conversion does require 9mm mags.

Quote:
Odd - I have a pair of Gen3 G23s and use a LDW 40-9 conversion barrel with them. Both guns function perfectly using the .40 mags with the 9mm conversion - they just hold a couple extra 9mm cartridges (12 instead of 10 - I'm in CA).

Yeah, I had the same experience. And, my 40's will actually feed out of a 9mm mag. But for competition, I still use the proper mags.

zeke4351
March 12, 2014, 09:58 AM
The .357 Sig was designed for a 125 grain bullet traveling at 1450 fps. Most people don't know this and they have never shot true .357 Sig ammo. Most ammo found in this caliber is watered down and is no different than a 9mm. The big name ammo company's such as Winchester or Federal etc. only claim around 1350 fps and seem to test short of what they advertise. Start paying attention to the specs on the ammo boxes that are sold as .357 Sig and you will see what I am talking about. One of the few places I know that you can buy true .357 Sig ammo is Underwood. They claim 1475 fps on the box and normally chrono 1500 fps or faster. Look at YouTube video testing of this ammo by tnoutdoors9 and you will see just how well a true .357 Sig will perform. Buffalo Bore and maybe a couple more places might sell the proper ammo but you have to know what you are looking for and shoot the full power ammo as designed to get any benefit from the .357 Sig. The Secret Service uses the .357 Sig to protect the President because it is known to penetrate just about everything except the human body. It will dump all of its energy to the body without exit for maximum damage. The .357 Sig was designed at 125 grains and 1450 fps to emulate the .357 magnum and it will do that only with full power ammo. People that dismiss it as 9mm +p+ do not know what they are talking about. Push a 125 grain 9mm bullet to 1500 fps and see how it works for you.

CDW4ME
March 12, 2014, 10:13 AM
I wouldn't put a lot of stock in kinetic energy @ the muzzle figures, as those figures are largely irrelevant for s.d. purposes...well, that is, except you to get to enjoy more recoil, muzzle flip and muzzle blast. ;)

KE has to matter in handguns, or 357 Mag wouldn't perform better than 38 special +p

Generally speaking, 357 Sig delivers 15-18% more KE than 9mm +p and +p+
How much that extra KE increases incapacitation potential is debatable, but it should.

AK103K
March 12, 2014, 10:23 AM
People that dismiss it as 9mm +p+ do not know what they are talking about.
I learned this straight from the engineers at Speer.

"The 9mm is a 35,000 psi, +P is 38,500 psi and +P+ is 40,000 psi. The 357 SIG is a 40,000 psi. Bullets of the same weight will approximate the same velocities in 357 SIG and +P+."

I found that out while trying to defend exactly what youre saying, while researching the difference between the two.

My main question to Speer at the time, was, would the 125 grain bullet in the 357SIG perform differently, at the few hundred FPS it was traveling over the 9mm, and thier answer was "no", and for the reason above.

357SIG is already at its max at 40,000 psi. There is no more room to go "+P".

Everyone seems to have claims, but what I was often seeing, was higher velocities with lighter bullets, and apples to oranges comparisons.

Sergei Mosin
March 12, 2014, 10:51 AM
I don't think I'd buy a dedicated .357 SIG platform, but I'd like a .357 SIG barrel for my .40 P229.

greyeyezz
March 12, 2014, 12:33 PM
The magazines are interchangeable between .357 Sig and .40 S&W they use the same follower, they are just marked one or the other.

The followers are/where considerably different in a Glock, this is and older photo I don't know if they changed. I've heard .40 followers work fine with .357. It's your call.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v190/greyeyezz/P1030717_zps243906fc.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/greyeyezz/media/P1030717_zps243906fc.jpg.html)

AK103K
March 12, 2014, 01:29 PM
SIG's were sort of caliber specific with some of their mags.

I had a P239 that came with 357SIG mags, and you could not load .40's into the mags, as they were narrower in the front due to the 357SIG's bottle neck.

I did have a few spare mags for it that were .40 mags, and they worked fine with the 357SIG's.

TfflHndn
March 12, 2014, 08:53 PM
I have a Sig 229 with .40, .357 and 9mm barrels. The .40 and .357 use the same magazines. Sergei, check out EFK Fire Dragon for a barrel. I bought their ported .40 barrel and it rocks. I really like the .357 sig cartridge for its feeding reliability and flat shooting. I prefer it over the .40 and 9mm, maybe partly because I reload them so they don't break the wallet to shoot.

cfullgraf
March 13, 2014, 07:57 AM
Smith and Wesson magazines for the Smith and Wesson M&P40 and the M&P357 are labeled for both cartridges. At least in the M&P line, the magazines are interchangeable.

I do not find 357Sig any more difficult to reload than any other handgun cartridge, but the process is a little different due to the bottleneck case. It fits fine with my reloading process as I prefer to resize and prep cases shortly after shooting and then reload a large batch of prepped cases at another time.

abq87120
March 13, 2014, 08:15 AM
I know many police departments like this round because it will shoot through car doors. I also like it because it seems to have less recoil than my 40's. Fun to shoot and not that bad to reload once you figure it out.

redbullitt
March 13, 2014, 07:55 PM
I like the round… I don't shoot it, but I would lol.

I saw a comment about frame size. I think in glock pistols this can be something to consider. If you have smaller hands I would bet money you do not like the fat framed glocks i.e. g20 or g21. The g19 and smaller framed guns fit smaller hands very well in most cases, and there is a notable difference between how a 9mm glock feels vs a 45 acp glock feels in the hand.

There are smaller frames etc of course too.

My take would be to buy a glock in 40 SW. THEN buy conversion barrels. I am pretty sure the 40SW frame will run the 9mm and 357. You may have to change mags, but that is a small price for a new caliber.

IF you do not mind the fat 10mm frame you can go that route and do the same thing.

abq87120
March 14, 2014, 02:26 AM
"...IF you do not mind the fat 10mm frame you can go that route and do the same thing. "

I believe with Glocks, a 45 can be converted to a 10mm. A 10mm will not take a 45 conversion. It's the outer diameter of the barrel that sets the limits.

CDW4ME
March 14, 2014, 02:17 PM
I converted a Glock 23 (40) to 357 Sig with a Glock 32 barrel.
The 40 magazines worked, but I went ahead and put 357 Sig followers in them (picky me)
I prefer the recoil of the 357 Sig.
As a model 23, it hit a little high for my aim; as a 357 Sig it hit a little low.
I replaced the rear sight with a taller one (29/30/36) and POA/POI is perfect.
I like that pistol better as a converted 32.

Ohen Cepel
March 14, 2014, 02:27 PM
I got a conversion barrel for a Glock .40 I had just in case I ever wanted to get into the .357SIG. It's a neat option but not one I would put a lot of $$ into now.

bluecollar
March 14, 2014, 11:16 PM
I don't think I will be holding one of MY 9mm pistols in MY hand and driving a 125 gr. round at close to 1500 fps:eek:

Onward Allusion
March 15, 2014, 11:32 AM
Yes. You can drop a 40 to 9 conversion in a Glock 22/23 and use the 40 mags but not recommended to do so for SD. You can do this with a few other 40's that have 9mm conversion barrels as well. You get a bit of rattle and will usually experience feeding problems on the last 9mm in the 40 mag.

Onward Allusion
March 15, 2014, 11:34 AM
Remember to get a higher weight recoil spring when shooting 357 from 40.

AK103K
March 15, 2014, 11:38 AM
They both use the same spring, you dont have to change them.

Onward Allusion
March 15, 2014, 12:19 PM
Depends on the gun. Yes, G22 & G31 use the same assembly, but I'd use a 20lb spring for 357 to reduce wear if not just for the recoil reduction.

AK103K
March 15, 2014, 12:36 PM
My 31 had less felt recoil than any of the 40's Ive ever shot. It feels just like a 9mm +P, +P+.

My 31 was showing aggressive wear on the underside of the slide, which the .40's also show. My 17's, with more +P+ through them than my 31 had 357SIG through it, show light finish wear at the same point, but no metal wear, whatsoever. They all use the same recoil spring.

My SIG's also used the same springs, and never showed any difference or appearance in wear, and again, the 357SIG's had less felt recoil than the .40's.

ViniferaVizslas
March 15, 2014, 05:44 PM
I'm no ballistics expert and I don't reload. I own all the common and many less common calibers. My long time favorite is a W German Sig 226 9mm. My primary carry is a Sig 239 .40 in which I prefer to shoot and carry loaded with .357 SIG.

I read what is posted about +p+ = .357 sig but for us off the shelf guys that doesn't seem to be the case:

Below are Underwood's 124 grain offerings. 125 gr .357 is the same.

Technical Information •Caliber: 9mm Luger
•Bullet Weight: 124 Grains
•Bullet Style: Speer Bonded Jacketed Hollow Point
•Case Type: Brass

Ballistics Information:

•Muzzle Velocity: 1300 fps
•Muzzle Energy: 465 ft. lbs.


Technical Information
•Caliber: 357 Sig
•Bullet Weight: 124 Grains
•Bullet Style: Nosler Jacketed Hollow Point
•Case Type: Brass

Ballistics Information:

•Muzzle Velocity: 1475 fps
•Muzzle Energy: 604 ft. lbs.


Also Buffalo Bore:

9mm

Item 24B/20 (+p+) 124gr. Jacketed Hollow Point 9

Browning Hi Power MK111, 4.6 inch barrel------------1330 fps
Beretta 92F, 4.9 inch barrel-------------------------------1304 fps
Glock 19, 4 inch barrel------------------------------------1296 fps

.357:


a. Sig. Mod. 229, 4 inch barrel - 1,430 fps (567 ft. lbs.)

PedalBiker
March 16, 2014, 09:33 AM
I have never seen .357 SIG in any gun store as far as the ammo except the one I work, and even then its been the same few boxes for a couple years with no requests for anything in it and noone buying a box sooo my question I guess is, is this a "dead" caliber like something that came and went like all those old wildcat calibers, is it just down to a small dedicated group of people who like it? If it really does pack as much punch as a .357 Magnum I'd love to get something compact in it for carry but not if its "unsupported" and going to be something thats not readily available, would have to be reloaded, and thus probably hard to find parts for a gun in the future chambered in it... any thoughts? I've heard some people say itd be better to get something in 10mm Auto instead?


Right now 357 Sig is easier to find than 22LR. It's going to be more available than 10mm at least for magazines and Glock parts. Being based on the very popular 40SW is a big bonus.

I think it has considerable merit in duty sized guns (4" + barrels) but is not going to be a good compact gun cartridge.

I'd also consider the route of getting a 40SW and then an extra 357 Sig barrel, but personally I don't have either. I like 9mm and 38+p. I am trying to like 45Auto with mixed results.

Peter M. Eick
March 16, 2014, 03:00 PM
I am biased since I am a 10mm fan also, but the sig is a good round and has one big advantage. 356 bullets are cheaper than 40 bullets if you reload. I can shoot about 1.5 to 2 rounds of 357 Sig for the same money as my 10mm when buying commercial bullets.

Run the math and see how your economics work. I shoot a lot of sig now for this reason.

Both are really good though.

private snowball
March 16, 2014, 06:40 PM
Post recanted after reading zeke4351's post.

Rinspeed
March 16, 2014, 07:44 PM
SIG's were sort of caliber specific with some of their mags.

I had a P239 that came with 357SIG mags, and you could not load .40's into the mags, as they were narrower in the front due to the 357SIG's bottle neck.





Sig tried very hard to make the 239 work with one mag for both. They just couldn't get one of them to run 100% so they had to change the design, unlike the 229 which uses one mag for both calibers.

Cooldill
March 16, 2014, 07:56 PM
If you really like this cartridge yes it is still available, and the internet is a good place to find it. You can also find some hot high-performance loads online from the likes of Double Tap and Underwood that are going to give you excellent results and will make a .357 SIG all it can be.

I'll admit that finding affordable target ammo for .357 SIG is not easy. However, there is light at the end of the tunnel! Many .357 SIG guns can also fire .40 S&W by just swapping out the barrel, even using the same magazines. I know that if I were to get a .357 SIG today, a Glock 31 would be the gun. I would also buy a Glock 22 barrel for it, because .40 S&W is abundant in my region and finding relatively affordable target ammo would be no problem at all!

I would highly recommend that if you are going to "pull the trigger" on a .357 SIG pistol, to get a gun that will accept .40 S&W with a barrel change and buy the .40 barrel. It really is an excellent option if you are set on the .357 SIG round.

Big Shrek
March 18, 2014, 05:28 PM
I still think they should have called it "9mm Magnum" instead... :)

Jenrick
March 22, 2014, 11:35 AM
I learned this straight from the engineers at Speer.

"The 9mm is a 35,000 psi, +P is 38,500 psi and +P+ is 40,000 psi. The 357 SIG is a 40,000 psi. Bullets of the same weight will approximate the same velocities in 357 SIG and +P+."

Speer may load their +P+ to 40K psi, but that is not a standard. +P+ has NO pressure limit, it's basically whatever you can stuff in there. A cartridge that grenades in the chamber would technically be +P+. That's why some people really like +P+ ammo (in whatever caliber), because it allows for much hotter loadings that work in modern guns with modern materials compared to what the original loading of the round was designed for with older materials.

-Jenrick

AK103K
March 22, 2014, 02:43 PM
Speer may load their +P+ to 40K psi, but that is not a standard.
I understand theres not a specific "standard", or at least an official SAAMI standard for it, but it does seem the major makers do have an idea as to what it is, or think it is or should be or Speer wouldnt have put it in writing to me.

I seriously doubt any of the makers want their name attached to rounds that go grenade, regardless the designation. Im sure they know where the limit is. As far as loading them down and calling them hot, the velocity is going to give you an idea as to what the pressure is, or again, at least according to Speer.

A simple chronograph check should tell you whos fibbing or not. Then again, if theres no standard, I guess its really not fibbing. Each individual knows what they are looking for and why, so I suppose it really doesnt matter.

Maybe we should email some of the others and see what they come up with.

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