Better 30-06 brass?


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trackforever
April 24, 2014, 09:43 AM
I have some old 30-06 brass that I shot 25 years ago (mixed military headstamp, it was in M-1 clips) and I just acquired some newer brass, which reads 30-06 SPRG (springfield) a couple of weeks ago from another re-loader. I want to start re-loading 30-06 in the near future. I now have more than enough brass. Which is a better for our modern powder and guns?I shoot a Remington 700.

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bainter1212
April 24, 2014, 09:47 AM
All of it should work just fine. I reload 30-06 military surplus from the 40s and 50s and also modern brass.
The brass that seems to be the crappiest is modern Federal brass. The milsurp stuff is very robust brass.

Just because it is old doesn't mean it is bad.

jwrowland77
April 24, 2014, 09:50 AM
Just make sure you separate headstamps....ie win, federal, r-p etc.

Each headstamp will be lighter or heavier than the next which means different internal capacities. Which means different internal case pressures. Each different headstamp will need it's own separate workup.

trackforever
April 24, 2014, 09:55 AM
Even amongst the military brass there are 4 or 5 different headstamps. Do the different numbers tell anything?

jwrowland77
April 24, 2014, 09:55 AM
The year made. 67=1967, 55=1955 and so on.

Yes even among military. All LC, etc

trackforever
April 24, 2014, 10:02 AM
I appreciate the input. Do you have a particular die you recommend? I will be shooting my 700 and one other 30-06 bolt action?

jwrowland77
April 24, 2014, 10:07 AM
All of them are good. I mainly have Hornady but I also have a couple RCBS.

Is your other 30-06 a Garand?

trackforever
April 24, 2014, 10:08 AM
No it is a bolt action I inherited from my dad a couple years ago. I don't remember the brand. It is in the safe.

jwrowland77
April 24, 2014, 10:11 AM
Oh ok cool. Yeah RCBS or Hornady are the two die sets I personally like.

trackforever
April 24, 2014, 10:15 AM
Thanks. I have used RCBS to load 9mm, 40 and 38 special. I have not entered into the rifle calibers yet.

ArchAngelCD
April 24, 2014, 05:56 PM
I appreciate the input. Do you have a particular die you recommend? I will be shooting my 700 and one other 30-06 bolt action?
Most, if not all dies on the market today will produce safe and accurate ammo. I use mostly Lee handgun dies but for some reason I prefer RCBS dies for rifle loading. i also have a set of Hornady dies for the 45-70 which are also very good dies. Since the prices for rifle dies are similar across the board I agree RCBS or Hornady dies would be a good choice.

MRH
April 24, 2014, 07:45 PM
I picked up a couple pieces of that SPRG marked brass at my range. Any one know who makes it?

CarJunkieLS1
April 24, 2014, 10:11 PM
SPRG is the abbreviation for the the caliber....30-06 Springfield.

MRH
April 24, 2014, 10:39 PM
Thanks, we know that, but as Trackforever noted, the ONLY marking on the brass is "30-06 SPRG"

trackforever
April 24, 2014, 10:44 PM
Some of my brass does not even say 30-06. Some says 30. Others do not even indicate the caliber. It only has numbers. I understand now, that some of those numbers, indicate the year of manufacturing.

ArchAngelCD
April 25, 2014, 01:23 AM
Some of my brass does not even say 30-06. Some says 30. Others do not even indicate the caliber. It only has numbers. I understand now, that some of those numbers, indicate the year of manufacturing.
The brass with only numbers is most probably military brass.

The brass marked 30-06 SPRG might have the manufacturers markings too. There might be a small LC or FC or even a R-P which are all makers. LC=Lake City, FC=Federal and R-P is Remington. (Remington Peters)

Can you possible post pictures of the brass you're not sure of. That would help in the identification.

KingM
April 25, 2014, 01:24 AM
After sizing I tried trimming to all one length & separating by water volume since that made the most since to me. I measured very careful & made up several loads. After running them over the Chrono I didn't see any difference in those & the randomly loaded rounds that were carefully measured. I'm no saying to the person looking for that last .001" not to concern themselves with it but for me it is the least of my concerns anymore.

oldreloader
April 25, 2014, 01:37 AM
unless you are a super paper puncher you'll never know the difference,

fguffey
April 25, 2014, 12:50 PM
Which is a better for our modern powder and guns? I shoot a Remington 700.

I separate cases by head stamps. I separate cases into groups of 20, most of my boxes/case holders hold 20 cases. When I load I load cases in groups of 20, logic, when I return from the range I tumble the cases, I have enough different head stamps that allowed me to sort the cases and get them back into the same box they were removed from.

Difference and more safer?. The military case is said to be heavier and therefore, thicker, that is only half truth, the case body is heavier and the case head is thinner from the bottom of the cup to case head.

I know, SO!? The R-P case head is thicker than the military case head by .060" but the case body is thinner than the military case body. Back to safet7y and difference. The powder column for the military case is longer and smaller in diameter than the powder column for the R-P case, the powder column for the R-P case is shorter and larger in diameter than the military 30/06 powder column. To most, who cares.

My opinion, the thick cases head of the R-P case increases case head support. I had rather the case head be stuffed into the chamber an additional .060" if there is any risk. The Remington has the three rings of steel but does not have the ability to prevent the case from running forward when avoiding the firing pin strike. Meaning, I size cases in the push feed rifle to fit the chamber in an effort to avoid case travel.

That leaves the question no one ever ask. WHY? Why reduce case travel by increasing the length of the case from the shoulder to the case head on a Remington type push feed rifle. for me? It is simple, when the case attempts to out run the firing pin the case moves forward, leaving a gap between the case head and bolt face. This gap allows the case body to lock onto the chamber when fired and the case head to move back to the bolt face, and that is the beginning of case head separation.

Who measures case head thickness and how does it make a difference? The 308 W has little trouble keeping up with the 30/06 with light bullets, the powder colum in the 30/06 case is longer and smaller in diameter than the 308 W powder column that is larger in diameter and shorter. My opinion, it makes a difference.

Then there are old friends, they sorted cases, their favorite cases came from WCC with Winchester type head stamps, WRA, WWC, WIN. etc.. More powder!

F. Guffey

scottishkat
April 25, 2014, 02:04 PM
I would add try the brass in your firearm as you go. Make sure they chamber easily. If I know they have been fired in another firearm I will always full length size the first time after that you can neck size a few times.

Good luck and shoot straight

Bob

trackforever
April 25, 2014, 02:06 PM
Thanks for your feedback. I am going to print that info, for future use.

medalguy
April 26, 2014, 12:55 AM
A few headstamps for military brass are LC (Lake City), SL (St Louis), TW (Twin Cities), WCC (Western Cartridge), FA (Frankfort Arsenal), DM (Des Moines), RA (Remington Arms), WRA (Winchester), FCC (Federal), DEN (Denver) and I might have missed someone there. The other half of the marking is the year of production, usually the last 2 digits of the year. Then there's foreign manufacturers and various commercial, domestic and overseas. Here's a link to a site listing nearly all headstamps you are likely to see:

http://cartridgecollectors.org/?page=headstampcodes

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